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NEWS
October 2, 2001
IN HIS 13 YEARS as the spiritual leader of Congregation Shomrei Emunah, Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb has splendidly combined two areas of expertise: religious scholarship and psychotherapy. Under his dynamic stewardship, the Greenspring Avenue congregation has grown from 160 families to more than 400. The 61-year-old rabbi has become a sought-after speaker nationwide on such touchy social issues as domestic violence in Orthodox families. Dr. Weinreb's skills now have received a further validation: He has been appointed the chief executive of the Orthodox Union, the New York-based central organization of 1,000 North American synagogues.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Most city residents haven't noticed the thin lines added to telephone poles in North Baltimore, creating a nearly invisible perimeter around the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus and surrounding neighborhoods. But for the Orthodox Jews who live within those neighborhoods, the wires create a symbolic wall, or eruv, which allows them to carry loads on the Sabbath within its borders. "It is the type of thing that anyone who doesn't need it won't notice," said Rabbi Binyamin Marwick of the Orthodox Union.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Most city residents haven't noticed the thin lines added to telephone poles in North Baltimore, creating a nearly invisible perimeter around the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus and surrounding neighborhoods. But for the Orthodox Jews who live within those neighborhoods, the wires create a symbolic wall, or eruv, which allows them to carry loads on the Sabbath within its borders. "It is the type of thing that anyone who doesn't need it won't notice," said Rabbi Binyamin Marwick of the Orthodox Union.
NEWS
By Holly Shiver and By Holly Shiver,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
For more than storage In its continuing effort to reduce time in the kitchen, Tupperware has created Heat N' Serve containers that let you freeze, store, serve and reheat food in one sleek black dish. Each container comes with a valve that automatically adjusts to allow steam to escape during microwaving, helping foods cook more evenly. Prices range from $8.95 for a 6 1/4 -cup container to $17 for an 8 1/4 -cup container. For more information, visit www.tupper ware.com or call 888-919-8099.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
IDAHO'S TOUGH GUYS BOISE, Idaho - Biologists with the Idaho National Guard have discovered a new species of fairy shrimp living in the oft-dry lake beds of Idaho's desert. Though they look delicate enough to match their name, they are strong enough to survive, unhatched, for years in the baking heat of summer and the frozen tundra of winter until enough rain falls and the pools return. Once they awaken they live a few frenzied weeks, mating and leaving behind tiny cyst-like offspring, and die. "This is a large, predatory fairy shrimp.
NEWS
By Holly Shiver and By Holly Shiver,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2005
For more than storage In its continuing effort to reduce time in the kitchen, Tupperware has created Heat N' Serve containers that let you freeze, store, serve and reheat food in one sleek black dish. Each container comes with a valve that automatically adjusts to allow steam to escape during microwaving, helping foods cook more evenly. Prices range from $8.95 for a 6 1/4 -cup container to $17 for an 8 1/4 -cup container. For more information, visit www.tupper ware.com or call 888-919-8099.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 27, 1996
Guide makes keeping kosher easierKosher for Passover foods from apple butter to yogurt are listed in the "Passover Directory 1996-5756" from the Orthodox Union of New York, whose staff ensures the kosher quality of hundreds of thousands of products in 48 countries. For a free copy, call Penina Rosenzweig, (212) 613-8141.French suggestions"The French Influence" is the theme of a series of tastings and demonstrations sponsored by the American Institute of Wine and Food. On April 1, chef Michael Gettier of M. Gettier offers Southern French cooking.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - When rabbis in Brooklyn spotted a tiny crustacean swimming in the tap water last spring, the ensuing debate about whether it rendered the city's water unkosher seemed like an amusing, but esoteric dispute in a particularly exacting Jewish enclave. However, in the months since, the discovery has changed the daily lives of tens of thousands of Orthodox Jews across the city. Plumbers in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens have been summoned to install water filters - some costing more than $1,000 - and dozens of restaurants have posted signs in their windows trumpeting that they filter their water.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS and MARK MATTHEWS,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Israel's peace strategy has split the American Jewish community, with some groups mounting an extraordinary public lobbying effort to generate opposition.Equally extraordinary, the prime minister of Israel has publicly denounced the U.S. Jewish opposition as having no right to undermine his government when their children are not risking their lives on the front lines of the Israeli-Arab conflict.The fight arises from a challenge to the Israeli government and the Clinton administration by leaders of the Zionist Organization of America (ZOA)
FEATURES
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2000
If Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman becomes the nation's next vice president, he would likely be the first to hang a mezuzah by his office door as a sign of his Jewish faith. The Connecticut Democrat also would be the first vice president to order kosher take-out or to observe Saturday as the Sabbath. As an Orthodox Jew, religious law generally forbids him from working sundown Friday until sundown Saturday. While balancing his religion with his career might prove a challenge, Al Gore's vice presidential candidate already has a track record of doing it. Lieberman, 58, has successfully juggled his strict religion and his busy career for 11 years in the U.S. Senate and before that as the state attorney general of Connecticut and as a state senator.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
IDAHO'S TOUGH GUYS BOISE, Idaho - Biologists with the Idaho National Guard have discovered a new species of fairy shrimp living in the oft-dry lake beds of Idaho's desert. Though they look delicate enough to match their name, they are strong enough to survive, unhatched, for years in the baking heat of summer and the frozen tundra of winter until enough rain falls and the pools return. Once they awaken they live a few frenzied weeks, mating and leaving behind tiny cyst-like offspring, and die. "This is a large, predatory fairy shrimp.
NEWS
October 2, 2001
IN HIS 13 YEARS as the spiritual leader of Congregation Shomrei Emunah, Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb has splendidly combined two areas of expertise: religious scholarship and psychotherapy. Under his dynamic stewardship, the Greenspring Avenue congregation has grown from 160 families to more than 400. The 61-year-old rabbi has become a sought-after speaker nationwide on such touchy social issues as domestic violence in Orthodox families. Dr. Weinreb's skills now have received a further validation: He has been appointed the chief executive of the Orthodox Union, the New York-based central organization of 1,000 North American synagogues.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
The pungent smell of horseradish, tinged with vinegar, clings to the walls, the workers and the machinery at Tulkoff Food Products Inc.'s plant in Canton. In a large room, batches of gnarly horseradish roots are carried up a conveyor and washed, and then tumbled into the first of two grinding mills. It's been business as usual this past week at the plant on Conkling Street. But for five days back in February, the company's automated process for crushing and blending the bitter root into a spicy condiment came to a standstill.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
If there was a single face for the bloody, divisive, maddening Israeli-Palestinian conflict of the past 35 years, it was Yasser Arafat's. For different Americans, that face represented hate and violence or hope and salvation. It was a legacy of polarization that Arafat apparently took to his grave. As he lay in a coma in a military hospital outside Paris, some American Jewish leaders called him a failed leader who squandered chances for peace between his people and Israel; others labeled him a terrorist whom the world would not miss.
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