Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOrthodox Judaism
IN THE NEWS

Orthodox Judaism

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
The largest-ever survey of the U.S. Jewish population show that most American Jews see themselves primarily as a cultural group, rather than as an ethnic or religious group.And fewer than 10 percent of U.S. Jews say that they prefer Orthodox Judaism, despite impressions that there has been a significant resurgence of traditionalist beliefs, said sociologists who released the report this month."We are tapping a dynamic change -- what has been called the desacralization of Judaism," said Barry Kosmin, research director for the Council of Jewish Federations and the survey's principal researcher.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 5, 2013
As Beit Tikvah Congregation's new rabbi, Larry Pinsker settled into his new office, a visitor couldn't help noticing stuffed animals and action figures on a bookshelf, including ones of Moses, Sigmund Freud and Plastic Man, a 1950s precursor of Elastic Man. The longtime rabbi, a comic book aficionado and collector of superhero figurines, has left his former post as associate rabbi of Shaarey Zedek in Winnipeg, Canada, largest conservative Jewish...
Advertisement
NEWS
August 9, 2000
HE DOESN'T FIT the mold. Joseph I. Lieberman isn't an image-maker's ideal. He's soft-spoken. He's not a riveting speaker. He blends into the background. But the two-term Connecticut senator has a solid reputation forintegrity. And he has bridged the political gap to work well with Republicans and Democrats. For Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore, Mr. Lieberman is the ideal surprise choice as a running mate. That choice shows the vice president wants to re-shape his image and step out of Bill Clinton's shadow.
NEWS
December 24, 2009
Mr: Keillor: Count me in your "amen" corner. Briefly, my background was Orthodox Judaism, then agnosticism, and on March 31, 2002, I was baptized at St. James Episcopal Church of Leesburg, Va., at the Great Easter Vigil. Like most people who associate with some faith, I'm struggling. Most people who have my last name are Orthodox Jews, and your words "And all those lousy holiday songs by Jewish guys" hit the mark. It raised the ire of my cousin, who became quite visceral. He is a lovable mensch who isn't that religious, but like others who aren't strong in their faith, circled the wagon on this.
NEWS
December 24, 2009
Mr: Keillor: Count me in your "amen" corner. Briefly, my background was Orthodox Judaism, then agnosticism, and on March 31, 2002, I was baptized at St. James Episcopal Church of Leesburg, Va., at the Great Easter Vigil. Like most people who associate with some faith, I'm struggling. Most people who have my last name are Orthodox Jews, and your words "And all those lousy holiday songs by Jewish guys" hit the mark. It raised the ire of my cousin, who became quite visceral. He is a lovable mensch who isn't that religious, but like others who aren't strong in their faith, circled the wagon on this.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 5, 2013
As Beit Tikvah Congregation's new rabbi, Larry Pinsker settled into his new office, a visitor couldn't help noticing stuffed animals and action figures on a bookshelf, including ones of Moses, Sigmund Freud and Plastic Man, a 1950s precursor of Elastic Man. The longtime rabbi, a comic book aficionado and collector of superhero figurines, has left his former post as associate rabbi of Shaarey Zedek in Winnipeg, Canada, largest conservative Jewish...
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
On anyone's short-list of the important nonfiction books since World War II, two are by Rachel Carson. "The Sea Around Us" (1951) and "Silent Spring" (1962), serialized, were high points in William Shawn's New Yorker tenure; then they spellbound the nation's book readers - and still do. Carson, a marine biologist and the hard-working editor-in-chief of Fish and Wildlife Service publications, lived in Silver Spring. With imperfect health and many family burdens, she was dead of cancer at 56, in 1964.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
Like a queen waiting for her king, Abby Siegel of Kensington sat on a white wicker throne between her mother and future mother-in-law, clutching their hands and straining her neck to catch a glimpse of her groom.Elie Schochet of Silver Spring was being danced to his bride by a horde of men, cheering, jumping and stamping their feet. He had just watched two witnesses sign the tenaim, the engagement agreement, and the ketubah, the marriage contract, in a nearby hall, made sweet with bottles of rum and chunks of cake.
NEWS
August 17, 1999
BALTIMORE's "Tamir craze" was short-lived -- a little over a year, with crowds cramming gymnasiums to watch 17-year-old basketball sensation Tamir Goodman perform for the Talmudical Academy. Now he is off to the Washington suburbs and a much larger arena at the Takoma Academy.Tamir will be close to an even bigger arena at the University of Maryland, College Park, where a four-year scholarship awaits in the fall of 2000. His stopover in Takoma Park lets him him hone his talent against more skilled teams.
NEWS
February 19, 1991
Benjamin Bak, founding rabbi of Baltimore's Shomrei Emunah synagogue and a widely respected spiritual leader of Orthodox Judaism, died of a heart attack Feb. 11 at St. Joseph Hospital. He was 72. Rabbi Bak was born in Lithuania, where he distinguished himself in his teens as a Torah scholar. He entered Yeshiva University in New York in 1940. A short time later, both of his parents and most of his other relatives in Lithuania were killed by the Nazis.In 1943, he married the former Muriel Alexander of New York, a teacher of Hebrew.
NEWS
August 9, 2000
HE DOESN'T FIT the mold. Joseph I. Lieberman isn't an image-maker's ideal. He's soft-spoken. He's not a riveting speaker. He blends into the background. But the two-term Connecticut senator has a solid reputation forintegrity. And he has bridged the political gap to work well with Republicans and Democrats. For Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore, Mr. Lieberman is the ideal surprise choice as a running mate. That choice shows the vice president wants to re-shape his image and step out of Bill Clinton's shadow.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
Like a queen waiting for her king, Abby Siegel of Kensington sat on a white wicker throne between her mother and future mother-in-law, clutching their hands and straining her neck to catch a glimpse of her groom.Elie Schochet of Silver Spring was being danced to his bride by a horde of men, cheering, jumping and stamping their feet. He had just watched two witnesses sign the tenaim, the engagement agreement, and the ketubah, the marriage contract, in a nearby hall, made sweet with bottles of rum and chunks of cake.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 21, 1997
On anyone's short-list of the important nonfiction books since World War II, two are by Rachel Carson. "The Sea Around Us" (1951) and "Silent Spring" (1962), serialized, were high points in William Shawn's New Yorker tenure; then they spellbound the nation's book readers - and still do. Carson, a marine biologist and the hard-working editor-in-chief of Fish and Wildlife Service publications, lived in Silver Spring. With imperfect health and many family burdens, she was dead of cancer at 56, in 1964.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 30, 1991
The largest-ever survey of the U.S. Jewish population show that most American Jews see themselves primarily as a cultural group, rather than as an ethnic or religious group.And fewer than 10 percent of U.S. Jews say that they prefer Orthodox Judaism, despite impressions that there has been a significant resurgence of traditionalist beliefs, said sociologists who released the report this month."We are tapping a dynamic change -- what has been called the desacralization of Judaism," said Barry Kosmin, research director for the Council of Jewish Federations and the survey's principal researcher.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 26, 2000
The excruciating "La Grande Bouffe," Marco Ferreri's 1973 movie about four men who engage in a weekend of gluttony, sex and self-destruction, will be at The Charles tonight and will be shown at matinees over the weekend. Marcello Mastroianni, Phillipe Noiret, Ugo Tognazzi and Michel Piccoli star; even with that cast, viewers are advised to see it on an empty stomach. The Charles will also play "Kadosh," Amos Gitai's film that The Sun's Chris Kaltenbach called "a beautifully crafted, wonderfully acted meditation on the seeming incompatibility of Orthodox Judaism and modern sexual mores," in matinees tomorrow, Sunday and Monday.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | May 25, 1992
Like most American Jewish boys in the 1920s, Sylvan Wolpert was learning his religion in Hebrew school after putting in a full day of public school -- until his father demanded one day that he read aloud from a Hebrew prayer book."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.