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Orson Welles

FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
Oct. 30, 1938, was a typical cool autumn Sunday as Baltimoreans relished the news that Hopkins had defeated Haverford College, 7-6, after Charlie Rudo scored on an 80-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. On the other hand, Navy and Penn had slugged it out through four grinding periods to a scoreless tie.Headlines in The Sun promised that the War Admiral-Seabiscuit match race that Tuesday would open a "Brilliant Meeting" at Pimlico Race Course, while Brenda Frazier, New York's "glamour deb," had attended the Velvet Ball that weekend.
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NEWS
August 24, 2002
Edith Lutyens Bel Geddes, 95, a costume designer and theatrical producer, died Aug. 16 in Hudson, N.Y. Known professionally as Edith Lutyens, she created costumes for theater, ballet and film and was a costume consultant to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Ms. Lutyens designed costumes for theater productions of The Crucible and A Streetcar Named Desire, as well as for several Ballet Theater productions, including Dim Luster and Fancy Free. She was responsible for the costumes of Orson Welles in his 1946 production of Around the World in 80 Days, and of Katharine Cornell in Antony and Cleopatra in 1947.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 3, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Lee Remick, the alluring actress who gained fame and empathy as the haunting alcoholic in "Days of Wine and Roses," died yesterday at her home here of cancer.The versatile performer, who was known for her talent in blending the innocence of youth and the sensuality of womanhood into a single dramatic commodity, was 55.Tumors had been found on her kidneys and lungs in 1989 after she fell ill while making a film in France.Ms. Remick's diversity as an actress was evident throughout what proved a lengthy career for a woman who died so young.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL HILL | September 21, 1990
"Citizen Leona" hits the small screen Sunday night, only instead of her Rosebud being a snow sled, it's the memory of her mother always liking her sisters best."Leona Helmsley: Queen of Mean," the CBS movie that will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) Sunday at 9 p.m., is like a fairy tale in which the witch gets to marry the prince. In "Citizen Kane," Orson Welles' character inherited a gold mine; in "Queen of Mean," Leona digs hers as fast as her sharpened fingernails will allow.Though loaded with the usual cautionary tales about money not buying happiness and absolute power corrupting absolutely and the dangers of vaulting over too many classes too quickly in an allegedly class-free country, "Queen of Mean" is really just a trash-wallow hoot, a "Mommy Dearest" of the hotel trade.
NEWS
February 8, 1994
Because of an editing error, the Joseph Cotten obituary did not run in yesterday's edition. LOS ANGELES -- Joseph Cotten, the polished Virginian who became a star with "Citizen Kane" and went on to play opposite Marilyn Monroe, Bette Davis, Ingrid Bergman and others, died of pneumonia Sunday at his Los Angeles home. He was 88.Mr. Cotten's smooth, low-key personality made him an ideal leading man for Hollywood's most famous actresses, and his versatility allowed him to play both villains ("Shadow of a Doubt")
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1996
The greatest movie ever, a pair of key figures in the civil rights movement, the greatest soul singer of his generation what a night for superlatives. Oh, yeah, and Miss U.S.A. too.* "Miss U.S.A. Pageant" (9 p.m.-about 11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Sorry, there's no telephone number to call to vote yea or nay on swimsuits; you'll just have to silently put up with a bunch of women parading around in bikinis. There are also evening gown and personality competitions, thank goodness. CBS.* "A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom (9 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moore and By Paul Moore,Sun Staff | July 8, 2001
"Natasha: The Biography of Natalie Wood," by Suzanne Finstad. Harmony Books. 454 pages. $25. In 1962, Natalie Wood was the second highest-paid actress in the world (behind Elizabeth Taylor) and was the embodiment of glamour. She had just been nominated for an Academy Award for "Splendor in the Grass" and her high-profile marriage to actor Robert Wagner was the stuff of magazine covers. But beneath the star persona of "Natalie Wood," created by her relentlessly ambitious and domineering mother, was an insecure and frustrated 24-year-old woman seeking to recapture her real identity -- Natasha Gurdin.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 16, 1993
Gee, this is going to be tough. What's tonight's best bet on TV? A rerun of "When Harry Met Sally . . .?" Or could it be that baseball game on CBS? Yeah, that's the ticket . . . and the way the playoff structure is being tampered with by the team owners, we may look back on this as the last great "old" World Series.* "When Harry Met Sally . . ." (8-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Nora Ephron, who wrote "Sleepless in Seattle," wrote this 1989 romantic comedy as well. Both of them star Meg Ryan, which most people know, but here's a more obscure nugget.
FEATURES
March 3, 2006
You know the "type." Bruce Willis, action guy (Die Hard, etc.). Milla Jovovich, seductive slayer of whatever (Resident Evil, etc.). Certain actors seem to thrive on being pigeonholed, with Willis' cop adventure 16 Blocks and Jovovich's futuristic keister kicker Ultraviolet opening today. Not exactly a stretch for either. We wonder, have you ever identified with an actor so strongly in a certain role that you were jarred when he or she tried to exhibit "range"? WHAT YOU SAY Cary Grant in Father Goose (1964)
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
Dreamgirls [Paramount] $35 The two-disc DVD set lives up to its "Showstopper Edition" moniker. It doesn't include any commentary from writer-director Bill Condon, but it's overflowing with extras, including a comprehensive making-of documentary, "Building the Dream," as well as numerous mini-docs that explore the complicated shooting and editing process for the musical numbers, the evocative costume design and even the theatrical lighting. Also featured are Beyonce Knowles' and Anika Noni Rose's auditions, 12 extended and alternate musical numbers and Knowles' music video of the Oscar-nominated tune, "Listen."
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