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By Mike Giuliano | January 11, 1991
OrpheusWhere: 1001 E. Pratt St.Hours: 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. As of Feb. 1, the hours will be 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Wednesdays to Sundays.Credit cards: MC, V.Call: 563-1416.Think about Little Italy and you naturally think about all of the restaurants that are somehow crammed into that tiny row-house neighborhood. You don't think about nightclubs in that part of town because there aren't any, or at least there weren't before. Orpheus opened there with the new year.Orpheus may not be large, but hey, this is miniature-scaled Little Italy we're talking about.
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By [JENNIFER CHOI] | April 10, 2008
`Orpheus' opera The lowdown -- Orpheus in the Underworld satirizes the Greek legend of Orpheus' pursuit of his wife, Eurydice, who gets taken to Hades by the god Pluto. The 19th-century operetta includes a can-can number and a duet between a soprano and a fly. Opera Vivente presents this irreverent take on Greek mythology tomorrow through April 19. If you go -- Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, April 17 and 19 and 3 p.m. Sunday at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St. $30-$50. 410-547-7997 or operavivente.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 2001
"Orfeu," Brazilian director Carlos Diegues' retelling of the Greek legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, will close out the Johns Hopkins' Medical Institutions' monthlong look at African films and filmmakers. Made as a direct counter to the 1959 French film "Black Orpheus," which Diegues says has nothing to do with present-day Brazil, "Orfeu" imagines its main characters as a legendary composer and lyricist and the innocent beauty with whom he falls in love. Lucinho, the film's heavy, is a drug lord whose lifelong friendship with Orfeu is threatened by his overriding passion for Eurydice.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 14, 2006
FILMS AT ST. THOMAS AQUINAS -- The 2006 Wednesday night film series at St. Thomas Aquinas Church, 37th Street and Roland Avenue, kicks off this week with Cecil B. DeMille's silent epic on the last days of Jesus Christ, 1927's The King of Kings. The film, DeMille's last silent, stars Joseph Schildkraut as Judas, Ernest Torrence as Peter, Dorothy Cumming as Mary and H.B. Warner as Jesus. Your host will be the Rev. George Restrepo who loves talking about film. Showtime is 7 p.m.; admission is free, although donations are accepted.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 20, 1995
Medical Institutions, heal thyselves. While Boris was gallivanting in Halifax, Viktor put the fire out in Chechnya and Budyonnovsk. Ask the Muscovite-in-the-street. The judges are right about the Sugarman sculpture. They ought to move Orpheus from his obscurity at Fort McHenry to the front of the courthouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [JENNIFER CHOI] | April 10, 2008
`Orpheus' opera The lowdown -- Orpheus in the Underworld satirizes the Greek legend of Orpheus' pursuit of his wife, Eurydice, who gets taken to Hades by the god Pluto. The 19th-century operetta includes a can-can number and a duet between a soprano and a fly. Opera Vivente presents this irreverent take on Greek mythology tomorrow through April 19. If you go -- Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. tomorrow, April 17 and 19 and 3 p.m. Sunday at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St. $30-$50. 410-547-7997 or operavivente.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2003
Which of the following is your favorite place to go dancing in Baltimore? 29.9 percent I only go clubbing in D.C. (20 votes) 26.9 percent The Hippo (18 votes) 17.9 percent Have a Nice Day Cafe (12 votes) 16.4 percent Redwood Trust (11 votes) 4.5 percent Club Orpheus (3 votes) 4.5 percent One Baltimore (3 votes) 67 total votes Question of the week: At which of the following venues do you prefer to see comedy acts? Baltimore Improv D.C. Improv Comedy Factory The Lyric Opera House The Ottobar The Warner Theatre Vote at www.sunspot.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2004
Frances Riepe came to the Maryland Historical Society Thursday night to voice her displeasure with Jonathan Borofsky's towering sculpture Male/Female, installed in front of Baltimore's Penn Station last spring. But for the time being, Riepe's protest, like the sculpture itself, was going nowhere. "For people who go to the station, it is an irritating presence. All you see is its feet," said Riepe, a Baltimore County resident who keeps a thick file of clippings and letters about the sculpture, and has circulated a petition in favor of its removal as part of what she calls "my personal crusade."
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 14, 2006
FILMS AT ST. THOMAS AQUINAS -- The 2006 Wednesday night film series at St. Thomas Aquinas Church, 37th Street and Roland Avenue, kicks off this week with Cecil B. DeMille's silent epic on the last days of Jesus Christ, 1927's The King of Kings. The film, DeMille's last silent, stars Joseph Schildkraut as Judas, Ernest Torrence as Peter, Dorothy Cumming as Mary and H.B. Warner as Jesus. Your host will be the Rev. George Restrepo who loves talking about film. Showtime is 7 p.m.; admission is free, although donations are accepted.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2003
Last weekend's aural possibilities included chronological extremes - a visit to the very earliest days of opera and a taste of some new and recent music for flute, clarinet and computer. As it turned out, decidedly contemporary elements spiced that ancient operatic experience, too. Opera officially dates to the 1590s, but the first extant work that fully meets the terms of the genre is Claudio Monteverdi's Orfeo from 1607. This telling of the mythological tale of Orpheus descending into the underworld to retrieve his beloved lacks the theatrical sweep of the composer's Coronation of Poppea, written more than three decades later, but it boasts a still-astonishing richness of musical ideas.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Who says that the neon-bright world of comic books can't explore serious and subtle themes? Eighteen-year-old Orpheus Collar used the graphic novel to investigate the question of how people would behave if they knew they had just 15 minutes to live. It was this entry, along with some paintings, that won a silver medal this year from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts -- making Collar one of the three top teenage painters in the United States, in the opinion of competition judges.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2004
Frances Riepe came to the Maryland Historical Society Thursday night to voice her displeasure with Jonathan Borofsky's towering sculpture Male/Female, installed in front of Baltimore's Penn Station last spring. But for the time being, Riepe's protest, like the sculpture itself, was going nowhere. "For people who go to the station, it is an irritating presence. All you see is its feet," said Riepe, a Baltimore County resident who keeps a thick file of clippings and letters about the sculpture, and has circulated a petition in favor of its removal as part of what she calls "my personal crusade."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2004
As the centerpieces of its summer-long Tennessee Williams festival, Washington's Kennedy Center is producing the playwright's three greatest hits. Across town, however, Arena Stage has boldly mounted one of Williams' more troubled and rarely seen plays, Orpheus Descending. Williams spent 17 years writing and rewriting this script, which had been his first professionally produced play - and his first commercial failure - under the title Battle of Angels in 1940. In 1957, when Williams re-christened it Orpheus Descending and declared it "finally finished," it not only contained versions of many of his classic characters - the sensual stranger, the dying patriarch, the woman lost in a fantasy world - but enough religious and mythological imagery to choke several plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2003
Which of the following is your favorite place to go dancing in Baltimore? 29.9 percent I only go clubbing in D.C. (20 votes) 26.9 percent The Hippo (18 votes) 17.9 percent Have a Nice Day Cafe (12 votes) 16.4 percent Redwood Trust (11 votes) 4.5 percent Club Orpheus (3 votes) 4.5 percent One Baltimore (3 votes) 67 total votes Question of the week: At which of the following venues do you prefer to see comedy acts? Baltimore Improv D.C. Improv Comedy Factory The Lyric Opera House The Ottobar The Warner Theatre Vote at www.sunspot.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 2003
Last weekend's aural possibilities included chronological extremes - a visit to the very earliest days of opera and a taste of some new and recent music for flute, clarinet and computer. As it turned out, decidedly contemporary elements spiced that ancient operatic experience, too. Opera officially dates to the 1590s, but the first extant work that fully meets the terms of the genre is Claudio Monteverdi's Orfeo from 1607. This telling of the mythological tale of Orpheus descending into the underworld to retrieve his beloved lacks the theatrical sweep of the composer's Coronation of Poppea, written more than three decades later, but it boasts a still-astonishing richness of musical ideas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 2001
"Orfeu," Brazilian director Carlos Diegues' retelling of the Greek legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, will close out the Johns Hopkins' Medical Institutions' monthlong look at African films and filmmakers. Made as a direct counter to the 1959 French film "Black Orpheus," which Diegues says has nothing to do with present-day Brazil, "Orfeu" imagines its main characters as a legendary composer and lyricist and the innocent beauty with whom he falls in love. Lucinho, the film's heavy, is a drug lord whose lifelong friendship with Orfeu is threatened by his overriding passion for Eurydice.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Who says that the neon-bright world of comic books can't explore serious and subtle themes? Eighteen-year-old Orpheus Collar used the graphic novel to investigate the question of how people would behave if they knew they had just 15 minutes to live. It was this entry, along with some paintings, that won a silver medal this year from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts -- making Collar one of the three top teenage painters in the United States, in the opinion of competition judges.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck 'Yellow Wallpaper' starts Wednesday at Theatre Project | January 31, 1993
Theater group will present musical showsTodd Pearthree, who has developed a specialty directing and choreographing musicals locally, has created his own company, the Musical Theatre Machine. Dedicated to presenting classics from Broadway's early days as well as re-examining short-lived works and introducing new ones, MTM will be in residence at the Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St.The inaugural production, Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's fairy-tale musical, "Into the Woods," opens a four-weekend run Friday.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 20, 1995
Medical Institutions, heal thyselves. While Boris was gallivanting in Halifax, Viktor put the fire out in Chechnya and Budyonnovsk. Ask the Muscovite-in-the-street. The judges are right about the Sugarman sculpture. They ought to move Orpheus from his obscurity at Fort McHenry to the front of the courthouse.
FEATURES
By Marilyn B. Bowden and Marilyn B. Bowden,Contributing Writer New York Times Special Features | May 18, 1993
Why do people instinctively turn to a favorite piece of music to help them unwind at the end of a difficult day? Because, say therapists, music is nature's tranquilizer.Though musical perception itself remains imperfectly understood, the beneficial effect of certain rhythms and melodies is too obvious to be disputed.But what kind of music works best to help people relax?Until recently, this has been a debate with adherents in several camps, including soft classical music; music concocted of chirping crickets, babbling brooks and other sounds found in the wild; or just any music that suits the listener's taste.
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