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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Close attention to detail is a good thing in a copy editor. We want the text to be factually accurate, grammatical, and clear. But that attention to detail carries with it the hazard of becoming obsessed with trifles.  Take, for example, the "widow," a short line of only a couple of words at the top of a leg of type, or the "orphan," its counterpart at the bottom. The page would certainly look a little cleaner if the top and bottom of each leg of type filled out the line. But the amount of time involved in recasting sentences to eliminate widows an orphans can be counterproductive, not to mention the risk each editor takes of creating error when rewording text.  Some editors also spend their time pulling pieces of text from one line to the next.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 11, 2014
The University System of Maryland Board of Regents voted Thursday to sell the vacant and deteriorated former Hebrew Orphan Asylum in West Baltimore to the Coppin Heights Community Development Corp. for redevelopment as a community health center, according to a university spokesman. The land is currently owned by Coppin State University, which acquired it as part of a 7.3-acre, $680,000 purchase from the Lutheran Home and Hospital Foundation Inc. in 2003. The chancellor recommended that the board allow Coppin State University to move forward with sale of the property.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Marni loves her sparkly pink flip-flops and the daily school lessons with her host family. Soon after he arrived on a flight from Ethiopia, Sammy switched his dress shoes for a pair of trendy Nikes that he wears everywhere. Isaac has accessorized with cool sunglasses and is teaching his hosts dance moves. After dental and eye check-ups, Betty is sporting a brighter smile and a new pair of glasses. Five young children, ages 6 to 9, are the first visitors to participate in Welcoming Angels, a new international orphan hosting program, organized by America World Adoption to assist Ethiopian children.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 26, 2014
People of a certain age will appreciate this: Charles G. "Chuck" Bernstein, who loved being a Baltimore circuit judge so much that he made a federal case out of his mandatory retirement at 70, appears to have been elected a judge again. If the tally from Tuesday's primary holds up, Bernstein will return to the bench at the age of 75. He'll probably ride his bike to work, too. The Orphans' Court of Baltimore City does not require its three judges to retire at a particular age. (It didn't even require a law degree until four years ago.)
EXPLORE
December 16, 2011
I wanted to thank the North County News and Pat Van den Beemt for the wonderful article she wrote about Caring for Kids of Kenya. I would also like to thank Dotty and Jeffrey Pitts who have sponsored Justin through his high school years and now in college. Dotty was actually the one who spotted Justin on my first visit to an orphanage. She was so taken with the children she has returned to Kenya twice to visit the orphanage. Caring for Kids has been very lucky to have such generous sponsors helping to keep many orphans in school and giving these children who have lost everything a reason to live.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 5, 1990
ABC's "20/20" tonight offers some of the most dramatic and moving pictures of human suffering that television has ever shown.Correspondent Tom Jarriel and producer Janice Tomlin report on the unimaginable suffering of orphans in Romania whom the government has deemed "unsalvageable." With them on their journey to these medieval warehouses of human misery (generously called orphanages) is Dr. Barbara Bascom, a pediatrician from Baltimore who sold her home here to work full time helping the orphans.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 27, 2010
Michael and Monica Simonsen, the Baltimore couple who have been trying to adopt a Haitian orphan toddler nearly all his life, were scheduled to fly home with him Tuesday evening. Michael Simonsen traveled to Haiti hoping to bring home Stanley Hermane, a 21-month-old who had been at an orphanage for most of his life. Simonsen and a couple of other adoptive fathers were able to bring seven Haitian orphans to the U.S. - far fewer than they expected - from Port-au-Prince early Monday morning.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2000
WHEN EMILY Frye wakes up in the morning in her Crofton home, she still feels the dusty road beneath her feet. She sees the dark poverty inside the village huts. But, most of all, she sees the children, orphaned by AIDS, alone in the world, with no food, no money, no schooling and no one to hug them at night."How long," she asks, "will I remember those children's eyes?" As her eyes fill with tears, Frye knows the answer. She will remember those children forever. She and her friend, Cleo McCoy of Odenton, returned to Maryland on Wednesday after a six-week trip to Zimbabwe, part of the outreach mission of Crofton's Community United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Harry L.W. "Tombstone" Hopkins, who was an insurance salesman, banker, rural mail carrier, orphans' court judge, registrar of wills, funeral home attendant and tombstone salesman, and finally a Harford County Living Treasure, died Sunday of septic shock at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The lifelong Bel Air resident was 87. "I've known Tombstone all of my life and he was a real Bel Air fixture," said Todd Holden, a former Aegis...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Next week's Republican primary will winnow from four to three the number of candidates running for Orphans Court judgeships. Despite its title, which is a holdover from English law, the court has nothing to do with children. Its three judges, who need not be lawyers, are probate judges and decide disputes dealing with estates. The four-year term is a part-time job, which is typically two days a week. Three incumbents are seeking re-election: Nancy C. Phelps, 58, of Gambrills; Gail J. Schaffer, 62, of Annapolis; and Gordon H. Witherspoon, 78, of Annapolis.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 14, 2014
Nobody asked me, but ... it's hard to believe that Dallas Dance, the Baltimore County school superintendent, could take a consulting job with a company that does business with the school system he runs and not see that as a problem. He says he "didn't recognize" a conflict of interest at the time. Here's what I'd write on his report card: "Dallas needs to work on making better choices. I suggest a summer camp for the ethically challenged. " Instead of just closing down another encampment of homeless people, maybe Baltimore officials can find a place for them and their tents, a small campground with running water, for the toughest cases - people who, for various reasons, do not fit into any of the city's current programs to reduce homelessness.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
The chairman of the Baltimore City liquor board will step down from his post to take a position on the Orphans' Court. Stephan Fogleman, who was confirmed Friday by the Maryland State Senate, expects to be sworn in as a judge within the next 30 days. He will serve the remainder of the term and plans to run in the June primary for the next four-year term. Fogleman said he wants to make the experience for families that come before the probate court as smooth as possible, saying "It can be a very difficult time for families.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| December 10, 2013
Here's a fun project for the kids: The two cute lion cubs at The Maryland Zoo are in need of names, and the zoo wants the public's input. The 9-week-old cubs, who lost their mother when she died from labor complications, are reported to be in good health. The zoo reports that: "The male cub has a lighter coat of fur and is more laid back, a pretty relaxed cub who likes to stay near his sister. The sister is covered in dark spots. She has a fiery personality, is always the first one to check out new things and she is the instigator in all of their lion-cub tussles.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Close attention to detail is a good thing in a copy editor. We want the text to be factually accurate, grammatical, and clear. But that attention to detail carries with it the hazard of becoming obsessed with trifles.  Take, for example, the "widow," a short line of only a couple of words at the top of a leg of type, or the "orphan," its counterpart at the bottom. The page would certainly look a little cleaner if the top and bottom of each leg of type filled out the line. But the amount of time involved in recasting sentences to eliminate widows an orphans can be counterproductive, not to mention the risk each editor takes of creating error when rewording text.  Some editors also spend their time pulling pieces of text from one line to the next.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Harry L.W. "Tombstone" Hopkins, who was an insurance salesman, banker, rural mail carrier, orphans' court judge, registrar of wills, funeral home attendant and tombstone salesman, and finally a Harford County Living Treasure, died Sunday of septic shock at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The lifelong Bel Air resident was 87. "I've known Tombstone all of my life and he was a real Bel Air fixture," said Todd Holden, a former Aegis...
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 15, 2013
The 2013 Pulitzer Prizes were announced today, and among the winners is "Devil in the Grove," a non-fiction account of Baltimore native Thurgood Marshall's fearless work for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in a Florida case. As we all know, Marshall went on to bring the nation's landmark school integration case, Brown vs. Board of Education, and later became a U.S. Supreme Court justice. The winners: FICTION -- "The Orphan Master's Son" by Adam Johnson, DRAMA -- "Disgraced" by Ayad Akhtar, HISTORY -- "Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam" by Fredrik Logeval l (Random House)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 3, 2000
Kazuo Ishiguro is victim of the dreaded fate of excellent novelists better known for a screen adaptation than for their real work. His albatross is "The Remains of the Day." Unlike many of his fellow sufferers (Michael Ondaatje and his "The English Patient" high among them), Ishiguro at least benefits from a first-rate movie. Still, films aren't novels. As serious an art form as film can be, it's different. Even at its finest potential it cannot achieve the richness, subtlety and substance of a truly accomplished novel.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 16, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - It was as if the Iraqi dictator, an orphan who grew up poor, wanted to prove to himself that children who lost their fathers could still lead fairy tale lives. So, once upon a time, Saddam Hussein built the lavish, $40 million Orphans Village in southwestern Baghdad. The campus, which opened 2 1/2 years ago, had landscaped gardens, columned classrooms, air-conditioned dormitories and a mosque. More than 600 orphans swam in the village pool, rode horses, played basketball and tennis.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 1, 2013
Nearly three years ago, I stood with neighborhood residents and preservationists before what looked like an abandoned and very sad West Baltimore brick castle. Below its remarkable towers and stout walls on Rayner Avenue, I thought that this venerable old orphanage would not make it another year. Clearly at the end of its days, it seemed ready to fall from its embankment and hit the street. It was vacant, lacking a good roof and was lightly boarded. It is owned by Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
A nonbinding referendum on whether residents want an elected county school board and elimination of the county's Orphans Court are among Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold's legislative priorities for this General Assembly session. "We should give the voters the right to have a direct say in who should oversee this 53 percent of the county budget," Leopold said of school system funding, hitting what has been a hot-button issue in the county for more than a decade. Leopold outlined his agenda Friday to the county's General Assembly delegation, giving legislators a mix of items affecting only the county and statewide legislative ideas, and drawing a mixed reception on his wish list.
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