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Orphanage

NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 1, 2010
Cora Barnes has a deep respect for the upbringing she received at the Baltimore orphanage she knew throughout her youth. She learned her algebra and Roman Catholic Latin hymns. She sang at midnight Masses and said her prayers. She also never forgot the love and friendships formed at the little-known institution. And now, nearly eight decades after she arrived at the orphanage, she returns weekly to its brick buildings set between Maryland Avenue and Howard Street. For the past 17 years, she has been a volunteer at what is now the Franciscan Center, where she sorts women's clothes and works actively with the poor and homeless.
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HEALTH
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | February 1, 2010
For Towson University student Alec Bersch, what began as a short trip to help his sister run a Haitian orphanage has become an open-ended mission to aid some of the island's neediest children. "This whole thing has personally given me a clearer view of my own purpose down here," the 21-year-old Bersch said from Wings of Hope, an orphanage for disabled children about 30 miles outside Port-au-Prince. "Before the quake, I loved Haiti and I enjoyed the environment, but that first night, when we were all frantic trying to move kids, that was the first time I had been in a position where I truly feared for the lives of other people."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
The Revs. Tracy Bruce and Stephen Davenport travel to Haiti every January to visit the music school in Port-au-Prince, the church in St. Etienne and the other development projects they support in the poorest nation in the Americas. But with the school and the church now destroyed, and no word yet from many of the friends with whom the husband-and-wife Episcopal clergy members have worked over the decades, they expect this month's trip to be different. "There's nothing that's coming out of Haiti at all in terms of communication right now from anybody on the ground," Bruce, rector of St. John's Episcopal Church in Glyndon, said Friday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. -Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. - Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
Alex Griffith doesn't remember it, but he lived the first year of his life at a Siberian hospital for abandoned children where the playground consisted of a single metal swing and an unkempt sandbox. Today, because of the efforts of the North Harford High School sophomore, the play area has slides, a climbing wall and dozens of other pieces, and has become a symbol of friendship and cooperation between two nations separated by an ocean and vastly different ideologies. Alex lived the first year of his life at a hospital for abandoned children in the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
The Victorian mansion's white marble steps sparkle outside a front door that has welcomed guests to a prosperous cabinetmaker's residence, then a convent, orphanage and special-needs school. This Charles Village-area landmark has been reinvented - this time as a residence for 22 homeless women. Called the Margaret Jenkins House, it is the work of the Women's Housing Coalition and Homes For America, two nonprofit organizations whose officials restored and renovated the property during the past 11 months.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 11, 2008
Adult horror returns to the screen with the crisp and frightening The Orphanage, a haunted-house tale about the dueling forces of childhood friendship and maternal love. The heroine, Laura (Belen Rueda) may not realize until the end how strongly she embodies both. All she and her doctor-husband Carlos (Fernando Cayo) hope to do is run a home for children with special needs in the abandoned orphanage where she grew up. But when they're about to open, their adopted son, Simon (Roger Princep)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2007
The Rev. Allen Jack Beck, a retired Baptist minister and missionary who preached in Baltimore and Harford County, died of Parkinson's disease July 3 at Manor Care South in York, Pa. The longtime Jarrettsville resident was 83. "He was a man of prayer and had a great passion for the word of God," said the Rev. John W. Manry, who succeeded Mr. Beck as pastor of North Harford Baptist Church upon his retirement in 1989. "He used to type books of the Bible so he could meditate on them. It was his way of studying the Bible," he said.
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