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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 21, 1993
Pop Music Critic It's amazing what people once considered unlistenable.Back in 1833, a German critic griped that Chopin's mazurkas were full of "ear-rending dissonances" and "repugnant contortions of melody and rhythm." A decade later, an English writer insisted that Franz Liszt wrote "the ugliest music extant." And in 1875, a Boston paper pronounced Tchaikovsky's work to be "strange, wild, ultra-modern. . . . Could we ever learn to love such music?"Of course we could -- and did. So is it any wonder that the same Ornette Coleman recordings that baffled and outraged jazz fans in the early '60s now seem totally accessible?
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By Cathy Carter | January 24, 2013
When jazz musician Yosvany Terry talks about music education, his voice rises with emotion. "We need to focus on the younger generation," he said by phone from his home in New York City. "They are the ones who will carry the torch into the future. We must expose them to different musical traditions so they can learn how to utilize what's come before them. Then they will be able to fly higher with their own creations. " Considering his passionate stance, it's fitting the Cuban born saxophonist is the headliner Saturday, Jan. 26 for the 9th Annual Jazz @ The Lake concert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 11, 2000
Ornette Coleman The Complete Science Fiction Sessions (Columbia/Legacy 63569) The Skies of America (Columbia/Legacy 63568) In the mid-'70s, Columbia Records decided to increase its profile as a jazz label through a series of "prestige" signings. The idea was simple enough. First, the label would sign some big-name musician who had never recorded for the label before. Next, it put up enough money to let him cut something really ambitious. Then the only thing to do was stand back and let the accolades (and sales)
NEWS
January 20, 2010
On January 13, 2010 ADDELLE devoted mother of V. Antoinette Coleman and Marcia A. Porter. She is also survived by two grandchildren Jonathan Coleman and Kevin M. Porter, Sr.; sister of Germaine Coleman and Ornette Coleman and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 8:30 a.m. Family will also receive friends on Friday at the St. James Episcopal Church, 1020 W. Lafayette Avenue at 10 a.m. followed by funeral services at 11 a.m.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
On January 13, 2010 ADDELLE devoted mother of V. Antoinette Coleman and Marcia A. Porter. She is also survived by two grandchildren Jonathan Coleman and Kevin M. Porter, Sr.; sister of Germaine Coleman and Ornette Coleman and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 8:30 a.m. Family will also receive friends on Friday at the St. James Episcopal Church, 1020 W. Lafayette Avenue at 10 a.m. followed by funeral services at 11 a.m.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
THE "NOW'S the Time" Jazz Band, a pun made by Whit Williams when he formed his Baltimore band while thinking of a similarly named Charlie "Yardbird" Parker number, gave a slam-bang terrific show of American jazz Saturday at Frederick Douglas Senior High School.* The band played solos by smooth veterans like trumpeter Roy "Tangle" McCoy and vibes man Jimmy "Captain" Wells, dramatic young trumpeter Tom Williams and spirited vocalist Sheila Ford.* It did 24 tunes from Scott Joplin to avant garde with heavy respect paid Parker, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Jimmy Heath, Cecil Bridgewater, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman, Chick Webb and Dizzy Gillespie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | September 12, 1996
Pet Shop BoysBilingual (Atlantic 82915)Considering that it opens with the lyric, "Y una discotecca por acqui?", it's no trick figuring out why the Pet Shop Boys dubbed their latest album "Bilingual." But there's more to the title than such a literal reading would reveal. In addition to playing the word for a pun in "Single" ("I'm single, bilingual" goes the nudge-wink chorus), the Pets also take it as a musical tactic, augmenting their standard synth-based sound with a host of South American sounds.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 30, 1991
Although most people associate the sound of jazz with sultry saxophones and darkly thumping double basses, it's really the trumpet (along with its siblings, the cornet and flugelhorn) that should stand as the style's pre-eminent instrument. After all, jazz was essentially invented on the trumpet, back in 1922 when Louis Armstrong stepped forth from the ensemble in KingOliver's band to deliver its first improvised solo; the instrument's bright, brash tone and extraordinary melodic flexibility made it a natural leader.
NEWS
By Cathy Carter | January 24, 2013
When jazz musician Yosvany Terry talks about music education, his voice rises with emotion. "We need to focus on the younger generation," he said by phone from his home in New York City. "They are the ones who will carry the torch into the future. We must expose them to different musical traditions so they can learn how to utilize what's come before them. Then they will be able to fly higher with their own creations. " Considering his passionate stance, it's fitting the Cuban born saxophonist is the headliner Saturday, Jan. 26 for the 9th Annual Jazz @ The Lake concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | November 18, 1999
Alto saxophonist Paul Desmond was often described as having a sound as dry as a perfect martini. If Desmond had a vocal counterpart, it would be singer and pianist Bob Dorough. An Arkansas native whose tart tone and wry wit has been entertaining jazz aficionados for more than four decades now, Dorough has always managed to be utterly cool yet totally accessible. Sure, his C.V. includes stints with both Miles Davis (recording the ultimate post-bop carol, "Blue Xmas," in 1962) and Ornette Coleman, but he was also the songwriter responsible for many of the tunes on the TV series "Schoolhouse Rock."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 11, 2000
Ornette Coleman The Complete Science Fiction Sessions (Columbia/Legacy 63569) The Skies of America (Columbia/Legacy 63568) In the mid-'70s, Columbia Records decided to increase its profile as a jazz label through a series of "prestige" signings. The idea was simple enough. First, the label would sign some big-name musician who had never recorded for the label before. Next, it put up enough money to let him cut something really ambitious. Then the only thing to do was stand back and let the accolades (and sales)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | September 12, 1996
Pet Shop BoysBilingual (Atlantic 82915)Considering that it opens with the lyric, "Y una discotecca por acqui?", it's no trick figuring out why the Pet Shop Boys dubbed their latest album "Bilingual." But there's more to the title than such a literal reading would reveal. In addition to playing the word for a pun in "Single" ("I'm single, bilingual" goes the nudge-wink chorus), the Pets also take it as a musical tactic, augmenting their standard synth-based sound with a host of South American sounds.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 21, 1993
Pop Music Critic It's amazing what people once considered unlistenable.Back in 1833, a German critic griped that Chopin's mazurkas were full of "ear-rending dissonances" and "repugnant contortions of melody and rhythm." A decade later, an English writer insisted that Franz Liszt wrote "the ugliest music extant." And in 1875, a Boston paper pronounced Tchaikovsky's work to be "strange, wild, ultra-modern. . . . Could we ever learn to love such music?"Of course we could -- and did. So is it any wonder that the same Ornette Coleman recordings that baffled and outraged jazz fans in the early '60s now seem totally accessible?
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 30, 1991
Although most people associate the sound of jazz with sultry saxophones and darkly thumping double basses, it's really the trumpet (along with its siblings, the cornet and flugelhorn) that should stand as the style's pre-eminent instrument. After all, jazz was essentially invented on the trumpet, back in 1922 when Louis Armstrong stepped forth from the ensemble in KingOliver's band to deliver its first improvised solo; the instrument's bright, brash tone and extraordinary melodic flexibility made it a natural leader.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1990
THE "NOW'S the Time" Jazz Band, a pun made by Whit Williams when he formed his Baltimore band while thinking of a similarly named Charlie "Yardbird" Parker number, gave a slam-bang terrific show of American jazz Saturday at Frederick Douglas Senior High School.* The band played solos by smooth veterans like trumpeter Roy "Tangle" McCoy and vibes man Jimmy "Captain" Wells, dramatic young trumpeter Tom Williams and spirited vocalist Sheila Ford.* It did 24 tunes from Scott Joplin to avant garde with heavy respect paid Parker, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Jimmy Heath, Cecil Bridgewater, Wayne Shorter, Ornette Coleman, Chick Webb and Dizzy Gillespie.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 19, 2009
Natasha Richardson dies after accident A spokesman for the family of Natasha Richardson says the actress has died. Richardson, a gifted and precocious heiress to acting royalty whose career highlights included the film Patty Hearst and a Tony-winning performance in a stage revival of Cabaret, died after suffering an apparent head injury from a skiing accident. She was 45. Richardson is the daughter of Vanessa Redgrave and the wife of Liam Neeson. They have two sons. Kanye West charged Los Angeles city prosecutors have charged rapper Kanye West with misdemeanor battery, grand theft and vandalism over the destruction of a paparazzo's camera.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
Don Cherry, 58, a trumpeter who played with the top jazz musicians, died Thursday of liver failure near Malaga, Spain. A native of Oklahoma, he began his career studying the works of trumpeter "Fats" Theodore Navarro. But his music soared above jazz to incorporate funk and ethnic music, folk and pop. He began playing professionally as a teen-ager. In 1956, he met saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman. Two years later they began recording with pianist Paul Bley, bassists Charlie Haden and drummer Billy Higgins.
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