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NEWS
March 24, 1992
In 1954, when the Israeli Consulate in New York needed to verify the authenticity of some ancient documents that had been discovered by a Bedouin shepherd in a cave near Jericho on the shores of the Dead Sea seven years earlier, it called in Harry M. Orlinsky. Dr. Orlinsky examined the writings, which had been put up for sale by a Syrian Orthodox prelate, and pronounced them authentic: Today, the Dead Sea Scrolls are recognized as the world's oldest surviving biblical writings.For most scholars, that would have been enough to ensure their place in history.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Elmer A. "Peck" Jones, the longtime Baltimore City Council clerk who had been a Democratic stalwart throughout his life, died Sunday of complications from kidney failure at Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie. He was 101. "I knew Mr. Jones when I was in the City Council, and he was such a gentleman. He was the salt of the earth and cared deeply for his city," said Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, who added, "He was never out sick, and I always thought of him as the Cal Ripken of City Hall.
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NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 18, 2002
Friends, Baltimoreans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to praise Wally Orlinsky, not to bury him. The good that men do lives after them; the evil is oft interred with their bones. So let it be with Wally. WITH APOLOGIES for taking great liberty with Shakespeare, that's the way we ought to remember Walter S. Orlinsky. Much has been made of his colorful quirks; his loud, brash personality; his creative, restless intellect. Much, too - too much, really - has been made of his federal conviction and imprisonment on bribery charges.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | February 12, 2002
LIFE WAS simpler when William Donald Schaefer was mayor of Baltimore and Wally Orlinsky president of the City Council. Schaefer took care of all potholes in every alley in town, while Wally built castles in the air. Orlinsky was the great imaginer of his time, a classic Kennedy liberal who thought government really could work things out, and that people from different backgrounds had more that bound them than divided them. He was the brilliant son of a Talmudic scholar, a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland law school with a head bursting with large and sometimes fanciful ideas - but he became passionate defending the importance of a linguistic blur such as Highlandtown's Mimi DiPietro or the street smarts of the old Silent Sixth council members out of South Baltimore, who hid behind a wall of self-consciousness.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | February 14, 2002
THE CLOCK said 25 past noon when Marc Steiner trudged out of Wally Orlinsky's farewell service at the Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral home. At such an hour, Steiner is supposed to be talking into a microphone at the radio station he officially rebirthed just two weeks ago. "Aren't you supposed to be doing a talk show right now?" somebody asked. In Tuesday's chilly sunlight on Reisterstown Road, Steiner shrugged his shoulders and muttered something about wanting to say goodbye. He didn't want to make a speech about it, and he didn't have to. He and Orlinsky were spiritual extended family, fueled by the same impulses carried by so many of those emerging now from the packed funeral service: William Donald Schaefer and Kweisi Mfume, Mary Pat and Joe Clarke, Carl Stokes and Joe Curran, Lou Panos and Sandy Rosenberg, Julian Lapides and Catherine Pugh, the Revs.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
Former Baltimore City Council President Walter S. Orlinsky has received a presidential pardon for the federal extortion conviction that brought an abrupt end to his quixotic political career nearly two decades ago. President Clinton granted the pardon Tuesday. Orlinsky got the news in a phone call that evening from his son, Eric G. Orlinsky, a Baltimore attorney who helped his father gain official forgiveness for the 1982 crime. "You can't ever quite walk away," Orlinsky, 62, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2002
It was a fitting send-off for Walter S. Orlinsky: a chapel packed with people, a funeral service filled with warm remembrances and spiced with humor. Orlinksy - the former state delegate and City Council president noted for his forward-thinking, if often off-the-wall, ideas and sardonic wit - was eulogized yesterday as a man whose enormous zest for life was quelled neither by the corruption conviction that ended his political career two decades ago nor by the cancer that took his life Saturday at age 63. Surveying the main chapel at Sol Levinson & Bros.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | February 29, 1996
William Donald Schaefer, Walter S. Orlinsky and Mary Pat Clarke finally can take revenge on the press that pilloried them for years.They've bought their own.Next week they will become columnists and investors in a new weekly newspaper. The Baltimore News' inaugural issue is scheduled for Wednesday and will be distributed each Wednesday in 20 Baltimore neighborhoods and on the Internet's World Wide Web, its backers say.Schaefer said this week, adding, "That was always my ambition, to have a newspaper that would have upbeat stories."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2002
I ALWAYS asked Wally Orlinsky for a piece of his mind. It was the best thing he had to offer -- smart, informed, outside-the-box thoughts on anything from heroin addiction in Baltimore to the crisis in the Middle East. He was sole inhabitant of a think tank called Wally World. Even as a defrocked public official, he had a keen and fresh grasp of local and national politics and fascinating opinions about everything -- mass transit, municipal water supplies, the news media, police corruption, trees, the Internet, rap music, Japanese art, the Orioles, the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
THE FUNERAL last week of former City Council President Walter S. Orlinsky got me thinking about the office -- and the differing approaches taken by some of its recent occupants. As the outpouring of stories and columns after his death Feb. 9 made clear, Orlinsky, who headed the council from 1971 to 1982, put his stamp on the No. 2 job in a government designed to give the mayor almost all the significant power. It was, first and foremost, a forum for his ideas, be they farfetched or forward-thinking.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | February 18, 2002
Friends, Baltimoreans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to praise Wally Orlinsky, not to bury him. The good that men do lives after them; the evil is oft interred with their bones. So let it be with Wally. WITH APOLOGIES for taking great liberty with Shakespeare, that's the way we ought to remember Walter S. Orlinsky. Much has been made of his colorful quirks; his loud, brash personality; his creative, restless intellect. Much, too - too much, really - has been made of his federal conviction and imprisonment on bribery charges.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | February 14, 2002
THE CLOCK said 25 past noon when Marc Steiner trudged out of Wally Orlinsky's farewell service at the Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral home. At such an hour, Steiner is supposed to be talking into a microphone at the radio station he officially rebirthed just two weeks ago. "Aren't you supposed to be doing a talk show right now?" somebody asked. In Tuesday's chilly sunlight on Reisterstown Road, Steiner shrugged his shoulders and muttered something about wanting to say goodbye. He didn't want to make a speech about it, and he didn't have to. He and Orlinsky were spiritual extended family, fueled by the same impulses carried by so many of those emerging now from the packed funeral service: William Donald Schaefer and Kweisi Mfume, Mary Pat and Joe Clarke, Carl Stokes and Joe Curran, Lou Panos and Sandy Rosenberg, Julian Lapides and Catherine Pugh, the Revs.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2002
It was a fitting send-off for Walter S. Orlinsky: a chapel packed with people, a funeral service filled with warm remembrances and spiced with humor. Orlinksy - the former state delegate and City Council president noted for his forward-thinking, if often off-the-wall, ideas and sardonic wit - was eulogized yesterday as a man whose enormous zest for life was quelled neither by the corruption conviction that ended his political career two decades ago nor by the cancer that took his life Saturday at age 63. Surveying the main chapel at Sol Levinson & Bros.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | February 12, 2002
LIFE WAS simpler when William Donald Schaefer was mayor of Baltimore and Wally Orlinsky president of the City Council. Schaefer took care of all potholes in every alley in town, while Wally built castles in the air. Orlinsky was the great imaginer of his time, a classic Kennedy liberal who thought government really could work things out, and that people from different backgrounds had more that bound them than divided them. He was the brilliant son of a Talmudic scholar, a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland law school with a head bursting with large and sometimes fanciful ideas - but he became passionate defending the importance of a linguistic blur such as Highlandtown's Mimi DiPietro or the street smarts of the old Silent Sixth council members out of South Baltimore, who hid behind a wall of self-consciousness.
NEWS
February 12, 2002
WALTER S. ORLINSKY started in politics as a 1960s boy-wonder state delegate. He was energetic, imaginative and idealistic, fighting for reforms in the Democratic Party and in the larger society. Mr. Orlinsky, who died this week at 63, was an important member of a progressive alliance that built bridges across racial divides, calmed tensions after the 1968 riots and later helped infuse the city with a sense of urban renaissance. With such rising activists as Parren Mitchell, Barbara Mikulski and Norman Reeves, he was involved in a movement to stop an expressway from destroying Fells Point, Federal Hill and sections of West Baltimore.
NEWS
February 12, 2002
WALTER S. ORLINSKY started in politics as a 1960s boy-wonder state delegate. He was energetic, imaginative and idealistic, fighting for reforms in the Democratic Party and in the larger society. Mr. Orlinsky, who died this week at 63, was an important member of a progressive alliance that built bridges across racial divides, calmed tensions after the 1968 riots and later helped infuse the city with a sense of urban renaissance. With such rising activists as Parren Mitchell, Barbara Mikulski and Norman Reeves, he was involved in a movement to stop an expressway from destroying Fells Point, Federal Hill and sections of West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | February 11, 2002
I ALWAYS asked Wally Orlinsky for a piece of his mind. It was the best thing he had to offer -- smart, informed, outside-the-box thoughts on anything from heroin addiction in Baltimore to the crisis in the Middle East. He was sole inhabitant of a think tank called Wally World. Even as a defrocked public official, he had a keen and fresh grasp of local and national politics and fascinating opinions about everything -- mass transit, municipal water supplies, the news media, police corruption, trees, the Internet, rap music, Japanese art, the Orioles, the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
Walter S. Orlinsky, the maverick Democrat, former delegate and Baltimore City Council president whose colorful political career came to an end in 1982 after he pleaded guilty to accepting a bribe from a sludge-hauling firm, died yesterday of colon cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 63. "He was one of the most brilliant politicians in the history of Baltimore," said former state Sen. Julian "Jack" Lapides. "He was an incredible mind and was totally consumed by politics.
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