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NEWS
March 23, 1992
George Delerue, Oscar-winning French composer who wrote soundtracks for "Day of the Jackal" and other movies, died Friday in Los Angeles. The composer, who was 67, captured an Academy Award in 1979 for best original soundtrack for "A Little Romance," and won praise for his work on Oliver Stone's "Platoon" in 1986. Mr. Delerue was nominated for three other best-original-score Oscars: "Anne of a Thousand Days" in 1969, "The Day of the Dolphin" in 1973 and "Julia" in 1977.Lettie Gay Carson, who fought to save railroad service Pennsylvania, died Wednesday in Newtown, Pa. She was 91. From 1927 until 1933, she was director of the Home Institute of the New York Herald Tribune.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 6, 2000
Shaft Music From and Inspired by "Shaft"(LaFace 73008-26080) Me, Myself & Irene Music from the Motion Picture (Elektra 62512) Gone in 60 Seconds Music from the Motion Picture (Island 314542 793) Ever notice that Hollywood blockbusters are invariably built around a single star? Look at the ads for "Shaft," and what you'll see is a surly Samuel L. Jackson staring hard. Even though Renee Zellweger's character gets third billing in the title, Jim Carrey's face is all that you see in the posters for "Me, Myself & Irene."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 22, 1991
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES II: THE SECRET OF 0) THE OOZEOriginal Soundtrack (SBK 96204)Vanilla Ice may have an on-screen role in the movie itself, but when it comes to the soundtrack for "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze," he's strictly a bit player. Not that his "Ninja Rap" is an especially shoddy piece of work; it's actually pretty catchy, even if its "Go ninja, go ninja, go!" chorus sounds awfully similar to an M. C. Hammer routine. But the truth is, Ice is frozen out by the album's other contributors, particularly Cathy Dennis and David Morales' searing "Find the Key to Your Life," Spunkadelic's feisty "Creatures of Habit" and Dan Hartman's soulful "(That's Your)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 6, 2000
High Fidelity Original Soundtrack (Hollywood 62188) Wonder Boys Music From the Motion Picture (Sony Music Soundtrax/Columbia 63849) Like the costumes and the setting, the music in a movie plays an important role in evoking the world its characters inhabit. It can offer clues about the protagonists' age and attitude, and can help us understand what they're feeling at a particular point in the action. But there are times when the soundtrack goes beyond that supporting role and actually helps to define the characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 6, 2000
High Fidelity Original Soundtrack (Hollywood 62188) Wonder Boys Music From the Motion Picture (Sony Music Soundtrax/Columbia 63849) Like the costumes and the setting, the music in a movie plays an important role in evoking the world its characters inhabit. It can offer clues about the protagonists' age and attitude, and can help us understand what they're feeling at a particular point in the action. But there are times when the soundtrack goes beyond that supporting role and actually helps to define the characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 17, 1995
KINGBelly (Sire/Reprise 45833)It's easy to understand why people have such great expectations for Belly. This quartet would seem to have all the ingredients for alternarock stardom: Obvious ambition; an attractive, mixed-gender lineup; an approachable, guitar-based sound; an impressive heritage, thanks to Tanya Donelly's days with Throwing Muses; and a solid track record, courtesy the 1993 hit "Feed the Tree." All Belly needs to complete the picture are great new songs -- something the group's second album, "King," just doesn't deliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 24, 1993
WAYNE'S WORLD 2Original Soundtrack (Reprise 45485)For a guy purporting to represent the heart and soul of modern suburban metal culture, Wayne Campbell sure has a jones for the '70s. Why else would the soundtrack to "Wayne's World 2" be full to bursting with the likes of Golden Earring's "Radar Love," the Edgar Winter Group's "Frankenstein," even the Village People classic "Y.M.C.A."? Not that these oldies are anything to complain about; frankly, they beat most of the contemporary stuff cold, particularly the Gin Blossoms' "Idiot Summer" and 4 Non Blondes' incredibly hokey "Mary's House."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 8, 1991
HOOKEDGreat White (Capitol 95330)Other hard rock acts might grow bigger and more bloated with each passing album, but not Great White. If anything, the music on "Hooked" is so lean and mean it makes the stripped-down sound of "Twice Shy," the group's last album, seem almost ornate. Granted, the group still has a weakness for mushy sentimentality, as soppy ballads like "Lovin' Kind" demonstrate, but elsewhere the band is strictly business. Whether backing Jack Russell's Zeppelinesque vocals with gritty slide guitar in "Congo Square" or getting down to boogie basics with "Call It Rock and Roll," Great White gets the job done with a minimum of fuss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 15, 1996
The Crow: City of AngelsOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Hollywood 20472)Given the kind of response the Brandon Lee film "The Crow" generated, a sequel seemed inevitable -- if only to provide the excuse for another soundtrack album. But unlike its predecessor, which expanded the death-obsessed aura of goth culture to the full spectrum of alternarock, the soundtrack album for "The Crow: City of Angels" is much more hodgepodge in its approach. That's not to say it's any less listenable -- frankly, the first few tracks have more hooks than the whole of the first "Crow" soundtrack -- but it is markedly less consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 12, 1996
The Mirror Has Two FacesOriginal Soundtrack (Columbia 67887)Although film critics have carped that "The Mirror Has Two Faces" focuses too much on Barbra Streisand, music fans may have the opposite complaint about the album. Of the 24 tracks on the soundtrack to the movie, Streisand is audible on only three -- and on one of them ("You Picked Me!"), all we hear is a single line of dialogue and a couple of giggles. All there is in terms of actual songs are "All My Life," a nicely constructed but not terribly memorable ballad that gives Streisand an opportunity to show off her vocal coloring, and "I Finally Found Someone," a stagily romantic duet with Bryan Adams that's full of purring sweet talk but doesn't really throw any sparks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine JAZZ Marcus Roberts J.D. Considine | January 22, 1998
Titanic; Music from the Motion Picture (Sony Classical 0) 63213)Kundun; Music from the Original Soundtrack (Nonesuch 79460)In the stores, soundtracks tend to be pop-oriented affairs, star-laden packages that sound more like rock or R&B compilation albums than film scores. In the theaters, though, most of the music heard behind the actors still tends to be orchestral in nature -- the better to convey drama, tension or pathos. As a result, films from "Batman" to "Men in Black" end up spawning two separate soundtrack albums: A pop collection for the mass audience, and an orchestral album for film score collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 12, 1996
The Mirror Has Two FacesOriginal Soundtrack (Columbia 67887)Although film critics have carped that "The Mirror Has Two Faces" focuses too much on Barbra Streisand, music fans may have the opposite complaint about the album. Of the 24 tracks on the soundtrack to the movie, Streisand is audible on only three -- and on one of them ("You Picked Me!"), all we hear is a single line of dialogue and a couple of giggles. All there is in terms of actual songs are "All My Life," a nicely constructed but not terribly memorable ballad that gives Streisand an opportunity to show off her vocal coloring, and "I Finally Found Someone," a stagily romantic duet with Bryan Adams that's full of purring sweet talk but doesn't really throw any sparks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | August 15, 1996
The Crow: City of AngelsOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (Hollywood 20472)Given the kind of response the Brandon Lee film "The Crow" generated, a sequel seemed inevitable -- if only to provide the excuse for another soundtrack album. But unlike its predecessor, which expanded the death-obsessed aura of goth culture to the full spectrum of alternarock, the soundtrack album for "The Crow: City of Angels" is much more hodgepodge in its approach. That's not to say it's any less listenable -- frankly, the first few tracks have more hooks than the whole of the first "Crow" soundtrack -- but it is markedly less consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 17, 1995
KINGBelly (Sire/Reprise 45833)It's easy to understand why people have such great expectations for Belly. This quartet would seem to have all the ingredients for alternarock stardom: Obvious ambition; an attractive, mixed-gender lineup; an approachable, guitar-based sound; an impressive heritage, thanks to Tanya Donelly's days with Throwing Muses; and a solid track record, courtesy the 1993 hit "Feed the Tree." All Belly needs to complete the picture are great new songs -- something the group's second album, "King," just doesn't deliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 24, 1993
WAYNE'S WORLD 2Original Soundtrack (Reprise 45485)For a guy purporting to represent the heart and soul of modern suburban metal culture, Wayne Campbell sure has a jones for the '70s. Why else would the soundtrack to "Wayne's World 2" be full to bursting with the likes of Golden Earring's "Radar Love," the Edgar Winter Group's "Frankenstein," even the Village People classic "Y.M.C.A."? Not that these oldies are anything to complain about; frankly, they beat most of the contemporary stuff cold, particularly the Gin Blossoms' "Idiot Summer" and 4 Non Blondes' incredibly hokey "Mary's House."
NEWS
March 23, 1992
George Delerue, Oscar-winning French composer who wrote soundtracks for "Day of the Jackal" and other movies, died Friday in Los Angeles. The composer, who was 67, captured an Academy Award in 1979 for best original soundtrack for "A Little Romance," and won praise for his work on Oliver Stone's "Platoon" in 1986. Mr. Delerue was nominated for three other best-original-score Oscars: "Anne of a Thousand Days" in 1969, "The Day of the Dolphin" in 1973 and "Julia" in 1977.Lettie Gay Carson, who fought to save railroad service Pennsylvania, died Wednesday in Newtown, Pa. She was 91. From 1927 until 1933, she was director of the Home Institute of the New York Herald Tribune.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 6, 2000
Shaft Music From and Inspired by "Shaft"(LaFace 73008-26080) Me, Myself & Irene Music from the Motion Picture (Elektra 62512) Gone in 60 Seconds Music from the Motion Picture (Island 314542 793) Ever notice that Hollywood blockbusters are invariably built around a single star? Look at the ads for "Shaft," and what you'll see is a surly Samuel L. Jackson staring hard. Even though Renee Zellweger's character gets third billing in the title, Jim Carrey's face is all that you see in the posters for "Me, Myself & Irene."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine JAZZ Marcus Roberts J.D. Considine | January 22, 1998
Titanic; Music from the Motion Picture (Sony Classical 0) 63213)Kundun; Music from the Original Soundtrack (Nonesuch 79460)In the stores, soundtracks tend to be pop-oriented affairs, star-laden packages that sound more like rock or R&B compilation albums than film scores. In the theaters, though, most of the music heard behind the actors still tends to be orchestral in nature -- the better to convey drama, tension or pathos. As a result, films from "Batman" to "Men in Black" end up spawning two separate soundtrack albums: A pop collection for the mass audience, and an orchestral album for film score collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 22, 1991
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES II: THE SECRET OF 0) THE OOZEOriginal Soundtrack (SBK 96204)Vanilla Ice may have an on-screen role in the movie itself, but when it comes to the soundtrack for "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze," he's strictly a bit player. Not that his "Ninja Rap" is an especially shoddy piece of work; it's actually pretty catchy, even if its "Go ninja, go ninja, go!" chorus sounds awfully similar to an M. C. Hammer routine. But the truth is, Ice is frozen out by the album's other contributors, particularly Cathy Dennis and David Morales' searing "Find the Key to Your Life," Spunkadelic's feisty "Creatures of Habit" and Dan Hartman's soulful "(That's Your)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 8, 1991
HOOKEDGreat White (Capitol 95330)Other hard rock acts might grow bigger and more bloated with each passing album, but not Great White. If anything, the music on "Hooked" is so lean and mean it makes the stripped-down sound of "Twice Shy," the group's last album, seem almost ornate. Granted, the group still has a weakness for mushy sentimentality, as soppy ballads like "Lovin' Kind" demonstrate, but elsewhere the band is strictly business. Whether backing Jack Russell's Zeppelinesque vocals with gritty slide guitar in "Congo Square" or getting down to boogie basics with "Call It Rock and Roll," Great White gets the job done with a minimum of fuss.
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