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By Lou Cedrone | October 23, 1990
George Romero's ''Night of the Living Dead,'' released in 1968, was an awesomely bad film which, probably because of that, became a cult movie. Today, some of those who were children at the time actually look you in the eye and say it was one of the best films they ever saw.The remake, in color, is currently in release, and the good news (to the cult people) is that it is no better than the original. It may, in fact, be a little worse. You could make some allowances in 1968.After all, the film was done in Pittsburgh, on pennies, and it was Romero's first movie.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
"Brief Encounter," David Lean's 1945 movie based on a Noel Coward play about a thwarted romance, has long been spoken of with great reverence and routinely accorded four-star status. Personally, I'd shave off a half a star, if only because the soundtrack is so overstuffed with Rachmaninoff's surging, sighing Piano Concerto No. 2. Still, count me among those who treasure the film. Count me, too, among those who find much to savor in the theatrical version of "Brief Encounter," created by the U.K.-based troupe called Kneehigh in 2008.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 18, 2005
Inside Deep Throat is the story of a little $25,000 film that reportedly earned more than $600 million in box-office receipts - the kind of return every good capitalist dreams about. Of course, the film helped turn porn from a business into an industry, a fact that could temper some folks' enthusiasm for this tawdry, but profitable, little tale. Released in 1972, Deep Throat titillated some, infuriated others. Its creator was one Gerard Damiano, a New York hairdresser allegedly inspired to take up filmmaking by the tales he'd heard from frustrated housewives.
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By Dave Rosenthal | August 2, 2012
I had low expectations for the remake of"Total Recall,"one of my favorite movies. And it appears that they have been met. The movies are based on the great Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. " Dick was asci-fi master, and his works have been adpated for many other movies, including "Minority Report," "King of the Elves" and"The Adjustment Bureau. " The original, 1990 "Total Recall," which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, dealt with the blurred line between memory and reality as the hero confronted an improbable plot.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1990
CYBILL SHEPHERD says it best in "Texasville" when she says, "This is a good town to get depressed in." She's not talking about the title metropolis, but the description holds. This is not only a depressing town, this is a depressing movie.It's the sequel to the 1972 "Last Picture Show," which some think is one of the best films made in the '70s. No one is likely to think the sequel is one of the best films of the '90s. It may be one of the longest, one of the most pointless, but it is certainly not one of the best.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
Maurizio Nichetti's ''Icicle Thief,'' intended as a send-up of the 1949 film classic ''The Bicycle Thief,'' doesn't begin to take form until 20 minutes before it is finished. For far too long, it is too much like the original film. Those 20 minutes, however, are thoroughly delightful.Nichetti stars, and as the director of the film within the film, he is appearing on a television show that precedes the showing of his ''Icicle Thief,'' a drama done in the neo-realistic fashion of Vittorio De Sica's ''Bicycle Thief.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 15, 2008
It's rare, indeed, that a Hollywood sequel is as good, or better than, the original film - rarer still when the original is one of the greatest American films ever. All the more reason to cherish The Godfather: Part II, which airs tonight, immediately after The Godfather, on AMC. About 1972's The Godfather (8 p.m.), there are few superlatives left to throw around. Suffice it to say that it's one of those films that demands to be seen, lest one be accused of cultural ignorance. A culmination of the 1960s-era trend of turning bad guys into heroes, Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece fires on every cylinder: great acting (Marlon Brando is every bit as good as his reputation suggests)
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By Dave Rosenthal | August 2, 2012
I had low expectations for the remake of"Total Recall,"one of my favorite movies. And it appears that they have been met. The movies are based on the great Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. " Dick was asci-fi master, and his works have been adpated for many other movies, including "Minority Report," "King of the Elves" and"The Adjustment Bureau. " The original, 1990 "Total Recall," which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, dealt with the blurred line between memory and reality as the hero confronted an improbable plot.
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By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A photograph of former state Sen. Francis X. Kelly in the October issue of Baltimore Magazine has one not-so-small problem -- it appears as if he is exposing himself. Kelly, 61, said he didn't notice until his sons called it to his attention. They were more upset about it than he was, and told him they thought the photo was doctored, he said. The photo of Kelly, flanked by his four sons, accompanies a feature story about the former Baltimore County senator and his family-owned business, Kelly & Associates Insurance Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Cieply and Michael Cieply,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- When MGM released Barbershop 2: Back in Business in 2,700 theaters and on more than 3,000 screens Friday, it was aiming for a possible record with the widest release ever for a black-themed feature film. The studio is also testing a pet theory of Vice Chairman Chris McGurk: the notion that a big-league film franchise can be built on a minor-league budget. Just 17 months ago, MGM scored a surprise hit with the original Barbershop, a modestly budgeted ensemble comedy about one day in the life of a Chicago haircut emporium run by a struggling young barber played by movie star and rapper Ice Cube.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 15, 2008
It's rare, indeed, that a Hollywood sequel is as good, or better than, the original film - rarer still when the original is one of the greatest American films ever. All the more reason to cherish The Godfather: Part II, which airs tonight, immediately after The Godfather, on AMC. About 1972's The Godfather (8 p.m.), there are few superlatives left to throw around. Suffice it to say that it's one of those films that demands to be seen, lest one be accused of cultural ignorance. A culmination of the 1960s-era trend of turning bad guys into heroes, Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece fires on every cylinder: great acting (Marlon Brando is every bit as good as his reputation suggests)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 18, 2005
Inside Deep Throat is the story of a little $25,000 film that reportedly earned more than $600 million in box-office receipts - the kind of return every good capitalist dreams about. Of course, the film helped turn porn from a business into an industry, a fact that could temper some folks' enthusiasm for this tawdry, but profitable, little tale. Released in 1972, Deep Throat titillated some, infuriated others. Its creator was one Gerard Damiano, a New York hairdresser allegedly inspired to take up filmmaking by the tales he'd heard from frustrated housewives.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 20, 2004
Baltimore filmmaker Francis Xavier's Johnny Come Lately, the story of a criminal profiler lured out of retirement to help catch a serial killer targeting children, will have its world premiere at the Senator Thursday night. "I wanted to stay away from the teen-age-type thing," says Xavier, 42, insisting he's had enough of films in which teens are the victims. "I just thought that would be more terrifying, to deal with a serial killer of little kids, and I'm talking about kids 8, 9 years old."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Cieply and Michael Cieply,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- When MGM released Barbershop 2: Back in Business in 2,700 theaters and on more than 3,000 screens Friday, it was aiming for a possible record with the widest release ever for a black-themed feature film. The studio is also testing a pet theory of Vice Chairman Chris McGurk: the notion that a big-league film franchise can be built on a minor-league budget. Just 17 months ago, MGM scored a surprise hit with the original Barbershop, a modestly budgeted ensemble comedy about one day in the life of a Chicago haircut emporium run by a struggling young barber played by movie star and rapper Ice Cube.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2003
He's one of Hollywood's hottest young movie producers, an industry player with a smash new film, a hit cable television series and celebrity pals like Ben and Matt (as in Affleck and Damon) on speed dial. But Chris Moore is hardly one of those slick and glossy entertainment types. He's more the fun-loving frat-boy-next-door who's made it big -- and can't quite believe his good fortune. "I've been lucky all my life," says the 36-year-old Easton native, sounding upbeat and friendly, calling from the Beverly Hills area by cell phone.
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By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A photograph of former state Sen. Francis X. Kelly in the October issue of Baltimore Magazine has one not-so-small problem -- it appears as if he is exposing himself. Kelly, 61, said he didn't notice until his sons called it to his attention. They were more upset about it than he was, and told him they thought the photo was doctored, he said. The photo of Kelly, flanked by his four sons, accompanies a feature story about the former Baltimore County senator and his family-owned business, Kelly & Associates Insurance Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2003
He's one of Hollywood's hottest young movie producers, an industry player with a smash new film, a hit cable television series and celebrity pals like Ben and Matt (as in Affleck and Damon) on speed dial. But Chris Moore is hardly one of those slick and glossy entertainment types. He's more the fun-loving frat-boy-next-door who's made it big -- and can't quite believe his good fortune. "I've been lucky all my life," says the 36-year-old Easton native, sounding upbeat and friendly, calling from the Beverly Hills area by cell phone.
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By Lou Cedrone | May 10, 1991
The gimmicks and plot turns in ''FX 2'' are better than the movie itself, but both represent considerable assets. Both help dispel the initial notion that the new film is not that well directed or edited.Bryan Brown stars. He starred in the original film, one that was released in 1986. ''FX'' was a surprise success, hence the sequel, which is just as entertaining as the first. It also repeats some of the plot lines of the first.You might, however, want to be prepared. The ''FX'' movies are not kind to their women.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 9, 2001
The stars of "Hannibal" know full well the movie's in for a lot of flak. It's a film that will anger some people, disappoint others and invite comparisons to its illustrious ancestor, the Oscar-winning "The Silence of the Lambs." They know that some people are going to say it's too violent, that others are going to complain about the changes (both Jodie Foster and director Jonathan Demme, who appeared in "Silence," declined invitations to work on "Hannibal"), and others will decry a film with a cannibalistic murderer as its protagonist.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 26, 2001
Method acting is one thing. But casting a real-life vampire to play a vampire in your new film ... isn't that carrying things just a bit too far? Certainly, if the question is directed at the film's co-stars, who may not fancy the star paying so much attention to their necks. But maybe not, if the person being asked is F.W. Murnau, the legendary German silent film director casting "Nosferatu." After all, when you're the director, is anything off-limits when it comes to making a movie?
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