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Oriental Rugs

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By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Trying to put a little zip in your living room? Revive a dreary-looking dining area, or just redecorating? Consider an age-old solution that's experiencing a resurgence in popularity -- Oriental rugs.After some lean years fed by a shortage of these beauties, Oriental rugs are making a comeback, coinciding with the renaissance that wood floors are enjoying in homes across America."Ten or 20 years ago the supply was more limited," says Herb Gallagher, who owns and operates The Caravan Connection in Bowie with hiswife Barb.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
A former UMBC employee pleaded guilty to stealing $9,800 from the university so he could decorate his Catonsville home with oriental rugs, the attorney general's office announced Tuesday. Francis P. Nunoo-Quarcoo, former director of the university's visual arts department, created fake invoices for repairs to silk screening equipment, the attorney general's office said, but used the money to buy rugs from an Ellicott City shop. As a director, he had the authority to approve the invoices.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2010
A former UMBC employee pleaded guilty to stealing $9,800 from the university so he could decorate his Catonsville home with oriental rugs, the attorney general's office announced Tuesday. Francis P. Nunoo-Quarcoo, former director of the university's visual arts department, created fake invoices for repairs to silk screening equipment, the attorney general's office said, but used the money to buy rugs from an Ellicott City shop. As a director, he had the authority to approve the invoices.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
Aram Gasaros Dulkerian Jr., an Oriental rug dealer and restorer in Baltimore for nearly five decades, died of a respiratory ailment Sunday at Mercy Medical Center. The Mount Vernon resident was 78. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Armenian parents who fled Turkish persecution in 1917. His parents settled in Baltimore and in 1921 established United Oriental Rug Co. at Charles and 20th streets. A 1944 City College graduate, Mr. Dulkerian learned to identify, clean and care for Middle Eastern carpets as a 12-year-old.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | February 23, 1992
It often happens that people fall in love with the colors or pattern of an Oriental rug and then wonder where did it come from, what sort of people might have made it and how did they live."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
At first glance, the link between global politics and home decor might not be obvious. But in fact, the two have always been linked. The opening of trade with Japan in the 18th century caused a frenzy in Europe for motifs and designs of "Japonaiserie"; Britons with links to India in the 19th century decorated their houses with wicker and paisley.Now it's happening again, as events in Eastern Europe and Central Asia have opened previously closed borders and brought new attention to parts of the world once shrouded from outsiders.
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,Special to The Sun | October 16, 1994
There's something intriguing -- maybe even a little dangerous -- about the idea of buying an Oriental rug.Perhaps you picture yourself like Ingrid Bergman in "Casablanca," bartering in some Middle Eastern open-air market. The smell of goat sizzling over an open fire, the calling of prayers from a nearby mosque, the crush of the crowd, the veiled women, the camels . . .Oh, get over it.Probably the closest most of us will get to intrigue is a meeting room at some hotel, where a guy with a fake accent will try to pass off a cheap, brand-new carpet as a "genuine Persian antique."
NEWS
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | March 28, 2004
To the delight and enthusiasm of dealers, collectors and many homeowners, Oriental rugs are beginning to reclaim their status as the monarchs of home decoration, accompanied by a revival of natural dyes and hand-spun wool. Some see this as a way to dispel once and for all the so-called Dark Ages of rugmaking. In the early part of the 20th century, chemical dyes began to dominate and, in the opinion of many, to lower the quality of hand-woven rugs. The results were not always easy on the eyes of this ancient craft's aficionados.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | February 9, 1992
Q: When we bought our house six years ago, we knew it wasn't our dream home. We'd planned to stay just three years and then move on to something more our style. But in this economy, that's not going to happen.Now we're looking for ways to give things a little character, to take the boredom out of what is just an ordinary tract house. Any suggestions?A: Perhaps it will be comforting to learn you're in a boat that's already crowded with other homeowners who meant to be upwardly mobile and aren't just now.The best answer lies in architectural detailing you can add on at relatively little expense: Crown moldings, chair rails, door and window frames can be had by the running foot from any lumber yard or many home-supply stores.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
The other antiques rowThe Baltimore area has another antiques row, one you don't hear as much about as the shops on Howard Street. There are more than 20 antiques, gift and consignment stores in the block of York Road between Shawan and Warren roads in old Cockeysville. They aren't as chichi as the downtown stores; but if you're willing to do some browsing, you can find serious bargains. Look for collectibles, artwork, furniture, memorabilia, china, stained glass, Oriental rugs -- there's even a store that sells jukeboxes.
NEWS
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | March 28, 2004
To the delight and enthusiasm of dealers, collectors and many homeowners, Oriental rugs are beginning to reclaim their status as the monarchs of home decoration, accompanied by a revival of natural dyes and hand-spun wool. Some see this as a way to dispel once and for all the so-called Dark Ages of rugmaking. In the early part of the 20th century, chemical dyes began to dominate and, in the opinion of many, to lower the quality of hand-woven rugs. The results were not always easy on the eyes of this ancient craft's aficionados.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1998
At first glance, the link between global politics and home decor might not be obvious. But in fact, the two have always been linked. The opening of trade with Japan in the 18th century caused a frenzy in Europe for motifs and designs of "Japonaiserie"; Britons with links to India in the 19th century decorated their houses with wicker and paisley.Now it's happening again, as events in Eastern Europe and Central Asia have opened previously closed borders and brought new attention to parts of the world once shrouded from outsiders.
FEATURES
By Sharon Overton and Sharon Overton,Special to The Sun | October 16, 1994
There's something intriguing -- maybe even a little dangerous -- about the idea of buying an Oriental rug.Perhaps you picture yourself like Ingrid Bergman in "Casablanca," bartering in some Middle Eastern open-air market. The smell of goat sizzling over an open fire, the calling of prayers from a nearby mosque, the crush of the crowd, the veiled women, the camels . . .Oh, get over it.Probably the closest most of us will get to intrigue is a meeting room at some hotel, where a guy with a fake accent will try to pass off a cheap, brand-new carpet as a "genuine Persian antique."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
The other antiques rowThe Baltimore area has another antiques row, one you don't hear as much about as the shops on Howard Street. There are more than 20 antiques, gift and consignment stores in the block of York Road between Shawan and Warren roads in old Cockeysville. They aren't as chichi as the downtown stores; but if you're willing to do some browsing, you can find serious bargains. Look for collectibles, artwork, furniture, memorabilia, china, stained glass, Oriental rugs -- there's even a store that sells jukeboxes.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
A lily for many daysIt took hybridizer Jack Roberson 3,000 hybrid crosses to come up with Black-Eyed Stella, winner of the All-America Daylily honors for 1994. According to the All-America Daylily Selection Council, a nonprofit organization that tests and promotes superior cultivars, it exceeds all other day lilies in several important respects.The Black-Eyed Stella has an extraordinary length of bloom -- in California and Florida, as long as 300 days; in North Carolina, 145 days. Compare that to the average day lily (21 days a year)
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris and Linda Lowe Morris,Staff Writer | February 23, 1992
It often happens that people fall in love with the colors or pattern of an Oriental rug and then wonder where did it come from, what sort of people might have made it and how did they live."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
A lily for many daysIt took hybridizer Jack Roberson 3,000 hybrid crosses to come up with Black-Eyed Stella, winner of the All-America Daylily honors for 1994. According to the All-America Daylily Selection Council, a nonprofit organization that tests and promotes superior cultivars, it exceeds all other day lilies in several important respects.The Black-Eyed Stella has an extraordinary length of bloom -- in California and Florida, as long as 300 days; in North Carolina, 145 days. Compare that to the average day lily (21 days a year)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
Aram Gasaros Dulkerian Jr., an Oriental rug dealer and restorer in Baltimore for nearly five decades, died of a respiratory ailment Sunday at Mercy Medical Center. The Mount Vernon resident was 78. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Armenian parents who fled Turkish persecution in 1917. His parents settled in Baltimore and in 1921 established United Oriental Rug Co. at Charles and 20th streets. A 1944 City College graduate, Mr. Dulkerian learned to identify, clean and care for Middle Eastern carpets as a 12-year-old.
FEATURES
By Rose Bennett Gilbert and Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service | February 9, 1992
Q: When we bought our house six years ago, we knew it wasn't our dream home. We'd planned to stay just three years and then move on to something more our style. But in this economy, that's not going to happen.Now we're looking for ways to give things a little character, to take the boredom out of what is just an ordinary tract house. Any suggestions?A: Perhaps it will be comforting to learn you're in a boat that's already crowded with other homeowners who meant to be upwardly mobile and aren't just now.The best answer lies in architectural detailing you can add on at relatively little expense: Crown moldings, chair rails, door and window frames can be had by the running foot from any lumber yard or many home-supply stores.
NEWS
By William C. Ward and William C. Ward,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Trying to put a little zip in your living room? Revive a dreary-looking dining area, or just redecorating? Consider an age-old solution that's experiencing a resurgence in popularity -- Oriental rugs.After some lean years fed by a shortage of these beauties, Oriental rugs are making a comeback, coinciding with the renaissance that wood floors are enjoying in homes across America."Ten or 20 years ago the supply was more limited," says Herb Gallagher, who owns and operates The Caravan Connection in Bowie with hiswife Barb.
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