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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | November 23, 2009
Louise H. Muchler, who was organist and choir director at Timonium United Methodist Church for more than 40 years, died Tuesday of cancer at a daughter's home in Havre de Grace. She was 89. Louise Smith, the daughter of a coal company office worker and homemaker, was born and raised in Plymouth, Pa., an anthracite coal mining town near Wilkes-Barre. She was a 1937 graduate of Plymouth High School and attended what was then Catonsville Junior College. In 1972, she graduated from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
When Meyerhoff Symphony Hall was built back in the early 1980s, there was space for a proper pipe organ to be installed, which would have made the facility even more valuable. Too bad there wasn't any money. Since then, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has had to bring in an electronic substitute whenever programming music that calls for organ. The result invariably falls short of what the real sonic deal would be like. Unless some amazing benefactor drops a whole lot of money on the hall for a pipe organ, this situation will continue.
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NEWS
December 1, 2010
I read with great interest the article "Rare copy of the 'Star Spangled Banner' goes on the auction block" (Nov. 30), but I feel that the publisher of the item to be auctioned, Thomas Carr, continues to not get the recognition he deserves. Carr not only ran a music store but was also the organist at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church. While Chris Coover, a senior book and manuscript specialist at Christie's auction house says that "[Carr] may not have known that Francis Scott Key was the author," Key most certainly did know him since Key was a strong Episcopalian and a good friend of the Old St. Paul's rector at that time, Bishop Kemp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
Martha Jane Schneider, a piano teacher and church organist who had been a longtime resident of Cambridge, died June 24 of pneumonia at an assisted-living facility in Clemmons, N.C. She was 92. The daughter of a banker and a homemaker, Martha Jane Geoghegan was born and raised in Cambridge, where she grew up in a home on Oakley Street. After graduating in 1936 from Cambridge High School, she studied for a year at Strayer's Business College in Baltimore and then went to work for Country Trust Co., her father's bank.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Robert F. Twynham, the long-serving organist and music director at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen who created a popular Sunday musical series, died of a gastric obstruction March 23 at his Reservoir Hill home. He was 80. Though deaf in one ear and blind in one eye, he led the musical program at the cathedral for 37 years. News articles said he served under six rectors and three archbishops, two of them cardinals. He established a much-praised choral department, composed several major sacred works and a library of music for weekly worship, presented a long-running weekly concert series and oversaw sacred music-dramas.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2002
THURSDAY NIGHT, hundreds of local Catholics attended a special evening Mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Roman Catholic Church because it was the Feast of the Assumption. At the end, I was walking out of church, listening to the majestic organ music, when I turned around to see who was playing. To my surprise, the organist was not the church's music director, nor one of the usual instrumentalists. Instead, he was a teen-ager, barely beginning high school. But, boy, could he play! His fingers flew over the keyboards, his feet controlling the pedals as he played the Toccata from Widor's 5th Organ Symphony.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 22, 1992
It's time for a show of hands on whether the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards should have a real, live organist playing campy ballpark music.To all those people who have said "Right on" to the idea since it was proffered in this column a couple of weeks ago, I say what Freddie Graziaplena, the walk-around whiz of Highlandtown, used to say to his friends and neighbors on Election Day: "I need you now!"If you really want it to happen, then do something about it. Go to the phone. Sit down and write a letter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Bertha A. Elton, a retired church organist and Maryland National Bank trust officer, died Sept. 10 in her sleep at the Charlestown retirement community. She was 100. Bertha Adella Fisher, the daughter of a cabinetmaker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Brooklyn. She attended city schools. Mrs. Elton, who had taken organ lessons and was a member of what was then Immanuel Evangelical United Brethren Church in Brooklyn, became the church's organist and choir director in 1926, positions she held for the next 30 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
Martha Jane Schneider, a piano teacher and church organist who had been a longtime resident of Cambridge, died June 24 of pneumonia at an assisted-living facility in Clemmons, N.C. She was 92. The daughter of a banker and a homemaker, Martha Jane Geoghegan was born and raised in Cambridge, where she grew up in a home on Oakley Street. After graduating in 1936 from Cambridge High School, she studied for a year at Strayer's Business College in Baltimore and then went to work for Country Trust Co., her father's bank.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2001
"I should place an organist who is master of his instrument at the very head of all virtuosi," said Ludwig van Beethoven. Generations before, a 21-year-old German organist and composer named Johann Sebastian Bach had presaged Beethoven's sentiments by walking all the way from Arnstadt to Lubeck, some 150 miles, to experience the keyboard wizardry of Dietrich Buxtehude, the fellow reputed to be the greatest organist of his day. These days, superior organ...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 15, 2011
Robert F. Twynham, the long-serving organist and music director at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen who created a popular Sunday musical series, died of a gastric obstruction March 23 at his Reservoir Hill home. He was 80. Though deaf in one ear and blind in one eye, he led the musical program at the cathedral for 37 years. News articles said he served under six rectors and three archbishops, two of them cardinals. He established a much-praised choral department, composed several major sacred works and a library of music for weekly worship, presented a long-running weekly concert series and oversaw sacred music-dramas.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
It was last Easter when the note, a particularly high one, got stuck on the organ at Baltimore's St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church. Tim Murphy, the organist for the past 27 years, climbed inside the giant case and tinkered with it for several minutes to get it to stop. Hundreds of families could do little but stare at Murphy and each other. That's when it became clear that Murphy's applications of duct tape and skill could no longer cover up the fact that the 150-year-old organ needed a major overhaul.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I read with great interest the article "Rare copy of the 'Star Spangled Banner' goes on the auction block" (Nov. 30), but I feel that the publisher of the item to be auctioned, Thomas Carr, continues to not get the recognition he deserves. Carr not only ran a music store but was also the organist at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church. While Chris Coover, a senior book and manuscript specialist at Christie's auction house says that "[Carr] may not have known that Francis Scott Key was the author," Key most certainly did know him since Key was a strong Episcopalian and a good friend of the Old St. Paul's rector at that time, Bishop Kemp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Bertha A. Elton, a retired church organist and Maryland National Bank trust officer, died Sept. 10 in her sleep at the Charlestown retirement community. She was 100. Bertha Adella Fisher, the daughter of a cabinetmaker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Brooklyn. She attended city schools. Mrs. Elton, who had taken organ lessons and was a member of what was then Immanuel Evangelical United Brethren Church in Brooklyn, became the church's organist and choir director in 1926, positions she held for the next 30 years.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | April 14, 2010
Said it before, say it again: It's a great country, and one of its beauties is freedom of expression, freer now than ever before, and another is a general amiability that you find everywhere, the helpfulness of strangers, the pleasure of small talk. Of course it's spring and the air is brisk, and this makes for public happiness. And I've just come from Nashville and Seattle, two mightily congenial cities. The young and restless stroll the downtown honky-tonks and a sweet breeze blows, laden with flowers, and it is darned near idyllic.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
The Rev. William Smith Jr., a well-known Baltimore church organist who established the Christian record label Ice Music Group and founded two choirs and a church, died March 1 of cancer at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Windsor Mill resident was 53. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Park Heights neighborhood. He was a 1974 City College graduate and attended Towson University and the Peabody Conservatory. He was a graduate of the Living Word Bible College.
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