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BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 2008
COLUMBUS, Wis. - Neighboring dairy farmers in Columbus, Wis., thought Jim Miller and his family had embarked on a path to bankruptcy when they decided to produce organic milk. How could you run a farm without chemicals and make milk for a market that barely existed? That was over a decade ago, and the neighbors turned out to be wrong. Organic became the sweet spot of the milk business, providing farmers such as Miller with more-stable prices, and often more profits, than conventional dairy operations see. But over the past year, the milk business has been turned on its head, with many organic farmers getting squeezed as never before and conventional dairy farmers enjoying the best of times.
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Laurel Peltier | August 26, 2012
(Guest post by Laurel Peltier, free-lance writer, GreenLaurel.com blogger and mother of three.) Back-to-school means arranging carpools again and sitting through soccer practices, but also packing school lunches. To make this daily chore easier, a recent Coupons.com survey found that almost 70 percent of parents rely on store-bought, pre-packaged foods for their kid's lunch.  Convenient?  Yes, but there is a downside to pre-packaged lunch foods. First demerit: Juice boxes and individually wrapped 'grab and go' foods generate tons of lunch-time trash -- 67 pounds per child annually, according to a survey by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
KENNEDYVILLE -- Four grainy images flicker on the television screen in Keith Boone's office, monitoring every facet of streamlined efficiency that Horizon Organic Dairy has brought to the 133-acre Kent County farm the Colorado-based corporation bought three years ago. A glance at the video system allows the 41-year-old dairyman to calculate how much feed 520 or so cows are consuming or how quickly things are going in the milking parlor where workers milk...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Six people were infected with Campylobacter by raw milk from the Family Cow dairy store in Chambersburg, Pa., including three in Maryland, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday. The bacteria causes diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and can progress into a more serious bloodstream infection, usually two to five days after exposure. The state agency and the health department in Pennsylvania are advising consumers to discard any product bought from this farm since Jan. 1. The implicated milk comes in plastic gallon, half gallon and pint containers and is sold directly to consumers on the farm and at drop off points and retail stores in Pennsylvania.
FEATURES
Laurel Peltier | August 26, 2012
(Guest post by Laurel Peltier, free-lance writer, GreenLaurel.com blogger and mother of three.) Back-to-school means arranging carpools again and sitting through soccer practices, but also packing school lunches. To make this daily chore easier, a recent Coupons.com survey found that almost 70 percent of parents rely on store-bought, pre-packaged foods for their kid's lunch.  Convenient?  Yes, but there is a downside to pre-packaged lunch foods. First demerit: Juice boxes and individually wrapped 'grab and go' foods generate tons of lunch-time trash -- 67 pounds per child annually, according to a survey by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | August 28, 2006
KENNEDYVILLE -- Sprawling over 140 acres of hilly pastures outside this Eastern Shore crossroads, the Horizon Organic dairy farm looks for all the world like a postcard. But lately, it has become a flash point in a national debate about how to raise cows to supply a burgeoning market for organic products. At issue isn't the milk that comes from more than 500 Holsteins at the Kent County farm. It's about whether cows should be cows - or at least how much time they should get to spend outside the barn, grazing in green pastures of grass, clover or alfalfa.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
Six people were infected with Campylobacter by raw milk from the Family Cow dairy store in Chambersburg, Pa., including three in Maryland, the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday. The bacteria causes diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and can progress into a more serious bloodstream infection, usually two to five days after exposure. The state agency and the health department in Pennsylvania are advising consumers to discard any product bought from this farm since Jan. 1. The implicated milk comes in plastic gallon, half gallon and pint containers and is sold directly to consumers on the farm and at drop off points and retail stores in Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
Horizon Organic Dairy Inc., the Boulder, Colo. producer of organic dairy products, announced yesterday that it wants to sell its 465-acre dairy farm near Kennedyville that it opened four years ago. Pika Fisher, a spokeswoman for Horizon, said the sale of the Kent County farm is part of a corporate decision to get out of the business of milking cows and rely on outside suppliers for its milk. The company is also considering the sale of a much larger dairy farm in Hall, Idaho, along with 600 acres near California's Sacramento Valley, where it planned to open a dairy farm.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2007
Awards Atlantic Scaffolding and Atlantic Plant Services, units of Columbia-based Atlantic Industrial, received 10 Meritorious Safety Awards for Contractors from the National Petrochemical and Refiners Association. Software engineering firm Datatel Inc. presented Villa Julie College in Green Spring Valley with its 2007 Partner In Excellence award. Contract The Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association signed a contract to bring the Becker Pet Industry trade show to Baltimore for four successive years beginning in 2008.
NEWS
April 15, 2008
Yo, it appears some people in New Jersey, the nation's leader in auto thefts and toxic waste dumps, have a problem with Harford County. Harford County officials report that an e-mail circulated by unions representing workers at New Jersey's Fort Monmouth warns of an "active" Ku Klux Klan presence in Aberdeen and suggests local organic milk has a "high concentration" of a chemical found in rocket fuel. The e-mail is directed at workers soon to be transferred to Aberdeen Proving Ground under the federal base realignment and closure process.
BUSINESS
By Mike Hughlett and Mike Hughlett,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 2008
COLUMBUS, Wis. - Neighboring dairy farmers in Columbus, Wis., thought Jim Miller and his family had embarked on a path to bankruptcy when they decided to produce organic milk. How could you run a farm without chemicals and make milk for a market that barely existed? That was over a decade ago, and the neighbors turned out to be wrong. Organic became the sweet spot of the milk business, providing farmers such as Miller with more-stable prices, and often more profits, than conventional dairy operations see. But over the past year, the milk business has been turned on its head, with many organic farmers getting squeezed as never before and conventional dairy farmers enjoying the best of times.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | August 28, 2006
KENNEDYVILLE -- Sprawling over 140 acres of hilly pastures outside this Eastern Shore crossroads, the Horizon Organic dairy farm looks for all the world like a postcard. But lately, it has become a flash point in a national debate about how to raise cows to supply a burgeoning market for organic products. At issue isn't the milk that comes from more than 500 Holsteins at the Kent County farm. It's about whether cows should be cows - or at least how much time they should get to spend outside the barn, grazing in green pastures of grass, clover or alfalfa.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
KENNEDYVILLE -- Four grainy images flicker on the television screen in Keith Boone's office, monitoring every facet of streamlined efficiency that Horizon Organic Dairy has brought to the 133-acre Kent County farm the Colorado-based corporation bought three years ago. A glance at the video system allows the 41-year-old dairyman to calculate how much feed 520 or so cows are consuming or how quickly things are going in the milking parlor where workers milk...
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2005
Believe it or not, but a Boulder, Colo., company is offering to pay Maryland dairy farmers a premium price for their milk - perhaps as much as 60 percent more then they are getting now. If that's not enough to shock you wide awake hours before the 4 a.m. milking, consider this: The company will pay a bonus to farmers who sign up to take advantage of the offer. Add to the mix a long-term contract in which farmers would be guaranteed the same price month after month. This is not one of those "I'll sell you shares in the Bay Bridge" schemes, but there are strings attached to the deal.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | June 7, 2009
Patty Sullivan of Catonsville is stumped by the dairy case. One kind of milk promises to make her children smarter. Another claims to come from healthier cows. Unable to sort all that out, she reaches for good old, conventional Costco milk."I find it very confusing," said Sullivan, who picks up five gallons a week for the Burtonsville preschool she runs. "You need a research degree to find out the differences. And is it really that much better for you?" Not long ago, consumers only had to ponder one thing before hefting a gallon jug into the shopping cart: How much fat did they want?
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