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By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | September 8, 2007
I need to replace plants I lost to drought this summer. Is there some way to improve survival odds? Drought-proofing? Organic matter in soil acts like a sponge, holding water for plants to use. It also loosens the soil, so rainfall and oxygen can get into the soil and down to roots. Working a composted product into the whole planting bed is better than just adding it to the planting hole. Don't go overboard with the organics, though. Five percent organic matter is considered a good soil.
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By Mike Giuliano | June 22, 2011
Natural materials are put to a new sculptural use in Marcia Wolfson Ray 's aptly titled exhibit "Out of Context" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. The exhibit is completely in context in one regard: It is being spotlighted to coincide with the ongoing Columbia Festival of the Arts. Visitors attending such recent festival attractions as the concert by soul singer Bettye LaVette or the upcoming June 25 show by comedian Paula Poundstone are invited to visit the Ray gallery between acts.
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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
During the last week's warm spell, I began preparing a flowerbed, but the soil was still very wet. Should I till it now or wait for the soil to dry out? Aside from the weather, the one factor that limits gardeners more than all others is poor soil. To improve poor soil, you have to work with it and that typically requires digging or tilling in lots of organic matter. When organic matter is worked into dry soil, it can be thoroughly mixed in and breaks up the clay. This improves the overall soil structure.
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By DAN RODRICKS | April 14, 2009
I remember the first wave of guerrilla Dumpster divers. They wanted to feed the hungry of Baltimore, and they detested the practice of supermarkets throwing away so much food. So they raided Dumpsters on behalf of needy men, women and children who turned up at the city's soup kitchens, shelters and charitable pantries looking for food. Now comes a new kind of Dumpster diver: They scavenge through the American food chain on behalf of the planet - and their backyard gardens. Lizz King is one such Dumpster diver.
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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
Q. We are planning to remove some lawn area and plant a bed of shrubs and perennials. How should we prepare the area for planting? A. In spring, the lawn area can be treated with a herbicide like Roundup and then tilled under after it has died in one to two weeks. Or, you can remove, or strip, the lawn. Whether you strip the lawn by hand or machine, you should take about 1 inch of soil and roots along with the top of the grass. I prefer to prepare beds in late fall; however, herbicides are less effective at this time and it is often necessary to strip the sod. After the lawn is killed or removed, the soil should be amended with organic matter and then tilled.
NEWS
March 5, 1991
Muck dredged from the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay is rich in organic matter. That is why scientists study it intensively. But the spoil dredged to keep the bay's shipping channels deep enough for the biggest ocean-going freighters is smelly. That is true of most soils rich in organic matter. They smell like something you wouldn't want in your front yard. One whiff of a manured farm field should convince anyone of that. And yet many folks want manure for their gardens.That parallel should be kept in mind when considering a report by the task force Gov. William Donald Schaefer set up to figure out what to do with bay sludge.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
I have a very small garden space, but would like to plant tomatoes. Are there any plants that remain small? Tomatoes are classified in three categories according to how they grow: determinate, semideterminate and indeterminate. Determinate tomatoes grow to a limited size (2 feet to 3 feet) and quit growing. They tend to produce most of their fruit during a short period of summer. Indeterminates grow throughout the summer to larger sizes and spread their fruit production over a longer period.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 11, 2002
SOME FOLKS spend spring weekends honing their abs, hardening their derrieres or building up their biceps. As for me, lately I have been working on upping my humus. Ever since my test results came back from the lab, I have been following the advice offered by the soil savants at the University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service. After studying a dirt sample I sent them, they told me to add more organic matter to my garden plot, such as humus, the end product of decomposed organic matter.
NEWS
By Kathy Huber and Kathy Huber,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | October 7, 2001
Gardeners looking for a way to express patriotism and remember victims of last month's terrorist attacks and their families may consider planting red, white and blue gardens, or planting a rose, our national flower, or a tree. There are dozens of suitable roses, but gardeners have expressed interest in planting 'Peace' roses. As World War II began, cuttings from the 'Peace' rose, bred in France in the '30s, were flown to a rose nursery in the United States. After Berlin fell to the Allies, 'Peace,' a yellow hybrid tea with pink edges, became a 1946 All-America Rose Selections winner.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 22, 2011
Natural materials are put to a new sculptural use in Marcia Wolfson Ray 's aptly titled exhibit "Out of Context" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. The exhibit is completely in context in one regard: It is being spotlighted to coincide with the ongoing Columbia Festival of the Arts. Visitors attending such recent festival attractions as the concert by soul singer Bettye LaVette or the upcoming June 25 show by comedian Paula Poundstone are invited to visit the Ray gallery between acts.
NEWS
May 20, 2008
He's a 35-year-old foundation executive and former journalist who has been tapped to bring new relevancy - and new members - to the nation's oldest civil rights organization. With the selection of Benjamin Todd Jealous as its new president, the 99-year-old National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is sending a clear message that a tireless workhorse for equality and justice can still have fresh legs. It's an important message as Barack Obama, only a decade older than Mr. Jealous, is poised to become the first African-American to secure the Democratic Party's nomination for president.
NEWS
By Steven I. Apfelbaum and John Kimble | December 4, 2007
Switch to compact fluorescent light bulbs and plant a tree; these are the most popular strategies for mitigating climate change today. Yet world leaders gathered for the climate-change summit in Bali, Indonesia, this week should consider an alternative. It's one of the most overlooked yet most effective and inexpensive strategies available: Store carbon in the soil. This is one way Earth has managed carbon since it began. Earth's soil contains the second-largest quantity of carbon, where it has been the most stable and least vulnerable to fires and climate changes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | September 8, 2007
I need to replace plants I lost to drought this summer. Is there some way to improve survival odds? Drought-proofing? Organic matter in soil acts like a sponge, holding water for plants to use. It also loosens the soil, so rainfall and oxygen can get into the soil and down to roots. Working a composted product into the whole planting bed is better than just adding it to the planting hole. Don't go overboard with the organics, though. Five percent organic matter is considered a good soil.
NEWS
By Erika Gebel and Erika Gebel,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2007
THE TISSUE SAMPLE Paleontologists were able to extract bone-making collagen from the thighbone of a 68 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex. WE HAVE A MATCH Using the collagen extracted from the T. rex?s thighbone, paleontologists determined a link in the collagen material found in the bone and that of a modern-day chicken. Next time you order fried chicken, consider this: Beneath that crispy skin, you may find a link to the heart of history's most terrifying beast. New evidence unveiled in today's edition of Science puts the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex embarrassingly close - in evolutionary terms - to the modern-day chicken.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 2006
I've never seen flies so little and fuzzy in my house. How do I get rid of them? Drain flies may be found near any household drain, appearing as tiny 1/16- to 1/4 -inch triangles of pale brown, gray or black. Their larvae live in the gelatinous film, or slime, of drains and traps, feeding on algae, bacteria and fungi. They may also breed near sewer leaks, backups, dirty garbage cans, saucers under potted plants and condenser pans under refrigerators and air conditioners. Adult flies can live up to two weeks.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | April 25, 2004
I have a very small garden space, but would like to plant tomatoes. Are there any plants that remain small? Tomatoes are classified in three categories according to how they grow: determinate, semideterminate and indeterminate. Determinate tomatoes grow to a limited size (2 feet to 3 feet) and quit growing. They tend to produce most of their fruit during a short period of summer. Indeterminates grow throughout the summer to larger sizes and spread their fruit production over a longer period.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
I am planning to plant about 300 new daffodils this fall in an area that has a heavy clay soil. Should I do anything to the soil before planting? I have seen daffodils grow and bloom in poor, clay soil for many years; however, like many other plants, they will grow best in well-drained soil that has been supplemented with organic matter. If you have the time, prepare the soil by digging in a 3-inch layer of compost or other organic matter. Because daffodils are planted deep (6 inches)
FEATURES
April 20, 1991
Whether you are a container gardener or work a two-acre plot, there are a number of ways to practice environmentally sound gardening. Here are a few suggestions:* Winter cover crops, such as rye, barley and wheat, prevent erosion and add organic matter to the soil when they are turned under in spring.* Leaving a mulch on a garden over the winter also prevents topsoil erosion caused by rainfall (although some gardeners DTC argue that a winter mulch invites pests). Growers often leave harvest residue, such as corn stubble, as an erosion deterrent.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
During the last week's warm spell, I began preparing a flowerbed, but the soil was still very wet. Should I till it now or wait for the soil to dry out? Aside from the weather, the one factor that limits gardeners more than all others is poor soil. To improve poor soil, you have to work with it and that typically requires digging or tilling in lots of organic matter. When organic matter is worked into dry soil, it can be thoroughly mixed in and breaks up the clay. This improves the overall soil structure.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
I am planning to plant about 300 new daffodils this fall in an area that has a heavy clay soil. Should I do anything to the soil before planting? I have seen daffodils grow and bloom in poor, clay soil for many years; however, like many other plants, they will grow best in well-drained soil that has been supplemented with organic matter. If you have the time, prepare the soil by digging in a 3-inch layer of compost or other organic matter. Because daffodils are planted deep (6 inches)
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