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By Ruth Mullen and Ruth Mullen,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 7, 1999
Nancy Beaubaire brings a writer's flair and an environmentalist's passion to her new post as editor of Organic Gardening magazine. The glossy new redesign rolled off the presses recently as a souped-up version of its former self, full of stunning photography and tips on everything from organic lawns to gardening on the World Wide Web. Long known for its devotion to rural gardeners with large vegetable plots, the 600,000-circulation magazine...
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By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Wendy Johnson responded to the craziness of the Vietnam era the way a number of young people in my generation did. She withdrew from the world and retreated to a communal life in the hills above San Francisco, where she learned to live off the land and to nurture her soul with chanting and meditation and the teachings of Buddha. Many of those who dropped out during those tumultuous years would eventually return to the world, to one degree or another, but Johnson stayed, and she is still there.
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NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2001
IF YOU'RE a "mosquito magnet" who gets bitten as soon as you step outside, and if you want an alternative to expensive, smelly repellents, Robert Brown has a tip for you. "Spray some lemon-scented ammonia around the area. When it wears off, spray a little more," he says. "Or plant marigolds in your garden. They don't like marigolds. Another way is to rub some rosemary on your skin, that will keep them away." Brown dispenses these and other words of wisdom during his organic gardening class at Brooklyn Park Senior Center.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Sarah Kickler Kelber and Lori Sears and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Staff | May 9, 2004
Say goodbye to the mish-mash of castoff desk, metal filing cabinets and thrown-together shelving in the home office. The Christopher Lowell Collection from Office Depot offers furniture and accessories ranging from desks and chairs to credenzas and lamps coordinated by theme. Town, a cross of traditional and modern design, features frosted glass, Bordeaux wood and steel hardware. Country mixes wood tones, crown molding and leather insets for a more traditional feel. Art Deco and modern Hollywood meet in the City theme, which offers blond wood veneers and hand-detailed fixtures.
NEWS
By Gary Diamond and Gary Diamond,Contributing writer | October 13, 1991
Regardless of where you live, every day someone is mixing, spraying,dusting, dumping and injecting toxic chemicals into our environment.You don't have to look farther than your own neighborhood to see a tank truck loaded with chemical herbicides, pesticides and fertilizersspraying its deadly cocktail on someone's lawn.Organic gardeningcan give you the lush flowers and foliage you want without risking your health or endangering the environment. It essentially uses certain plants, animals and insects to control or repel harmful insects that feed or nest in fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2001
Q. My tulips did very poorly last spring, so I purchased some new bulbs and dug the old bulbs up last week. As I pulled them out, I noticed that many were rotting. Can I plant new bulbs in this same area? A. If you plant in the same area, you will likely have the same problem. Tulip bulb rot disease is caused by several soil-borne fungi that persist in the soil. The disease is worst in moist, poorly drained soils. I would prepare a new area for your bulbs that has well-drained, loamy soil.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | March 3, 1996
When Gardens Alive! sent me a sample of its plant food, the organic gardening company didn't know I'd be more impressed with its packaging. The plant food came in a recycled Liquid Plumr cardboard carton, packed in biodegradable "peanuts." You can compost them (they're starch-based) or they decompose in water.As for the plant food, it's too early to tell whether it's better than other plant foods, but the accompanying catalog is fascinating, with everything from organic gardening tips to products like a hormone that stops fleas from reproducing for up to seven months.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Wendy Johnson responded to the craziness of the Vietnam era the way a number of young people in my generation did. She withdrew from the world and retreated to a communal life in the hills above San Francisco, where she learned to live off the land and to nurture her soul with chanting and meditation and the teachings of Buddha. Many of those who dropped out during those tumultuous years would eventually return to the world, to one degree or another, but Johnson stayed, and she is still there.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 1999
IF IT'S true that "you reap what you sow," the Shaws can expect a bountiful harvest from their organic farm this year.Family members are planting a large variety of vegetables on their west Columbia property: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, cabbage, beets, turnips, eggplant, herbs, edible flowers and more.Unfortunately, putting good things into the ground isn't enough to ensure a profitable yield. Pests, disease and bad weather can conspire to make a good season turn bad.Even when production is high, farmers suffer when over-production results in depressed prices.
NEWS
By Diane E. Otts and Diane E. Otts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1996
Michelle Potter has always been passionate about the environment. And growing up in a single-parent household, she was always aware of a need to be thrifty. But it wasn't until 1987 that she made a connection between saving the Earth and saving money."When I started to garden organically, doing things like composting and using cayenne pepper and garlic spray to deter pests, I realized that not only were those methods effective and safe for the environment, but also that it was much cheaper than buying chemicals," says Potter, 37, who lives near Guilford.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2001
Q. My tulips did very poorly last spring, so I purchased some new bulbs and dug the old bulbs up last week. As I pulled them out, I noticed that many were rotting. Can I plant new bulbs in this same area? A. If you plant in the same area, you will likely have the same problem. Tulip bulb rot disease is caused by several soil-borne fungi that persist in the soil. The disease is worst in moist, poorly drained soils. I would prepare a new area for your bulbs that has well-drained, loamy soil.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 2001
IF YOU'RE a "mosquito magnet" who gets bitten as soon as you step outside, and if you want an alternative to expensive, smelly repellents, Robert Brown has a tip for you. "Spray some lemon-scented ammonia around the area. When it wears off, spray a little more," he says. "Or plant marigolds in your garden. They don't like marigolds. Another way is to rub some rosemary on your skin, that will keep them away." Brown dispenses these and other words of wisdom during his organic gardening class at Brooklyn Park Senior Center.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 7, 2000
LIKE A LOT of guys, I consider myself a cold, unfeeling type, a hard case. Farewells don't, as a rule, affect me. I can send a middle-schooler flying off to the Orient, or a teen-ager off to college, or a spouse off to the mall, and not shed a tear. But saying goodbye to the garden almost makes me cry.It is hard. It signals the end of the growing season and the end to hours of mindless puttering. What am I gonna do? How am I gonna measure my progress without peppers to pick, tomatoes to harvest and eggplants to thump?
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and By Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2000
It's a dream many of us have had: to be at the helm of a multimillion dollar enterprise doing work we love. For Maria Rodale, it is no dream, it is her life. And her heritage. Since taking over as editor of Organic Gardening magazine last year, Rodale is well on the way to becoming the voice of a new generation of organic gardeners. But what she wants most, she says, "is to de-mystify organic gardening." "It's fun, easy and safe," says Rodale, 38. "It's not complicated, there are no weird formulas, just common sense.
NEWS
July 11, 1999
Q. My honey locust trees were covered last fall with brown webs filled with caterpillars. I think they are back again. What are they and what can I do about them? I'm an organic gardener and don't want to use chemicals. A. Your trees are infested with mimosa webworm. The 1/2 -inch-long larvae feed on leaves under the protection of silken webs. You are witnessing the first generation, which will be followed by a second generation in late July and August. If the webs aren't yet dense, you can spray the larvae with B.t., a microbial insecticide used by organic gardeners and farmers.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 1999
IF IT'S true that "you reap what you sow," the Shaws can expect a bountiful harvest from their organic farm this year.Family members are planting a large variety of vegetables on their west Columbia property: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, cabbage, beets, turnips, eggplant, herbs, edible flowers and more.Unfortunately, putting good things into the ground isn't enough to ensure a profitable yield. Pests, disease and bad weather can conspire to make a good season turn bad.Even when production is high, farmers suffer when over-production results in depressed prices.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | March 26, 1995
You can tell it's spring.The swallows have returned to Capistrano, the buzzards are back in Hinckley, Ohio, and gardening offers are clogging my mailbox.Just last week, I received an offer to join the Organic Gardening Book Club, an advertisement for bulbs and perennials from an outfit in Michigan, and an offer for books on landscaping and flower selection.Some of the plants shown in these brochures look as if they were created by Dr. Frankenstein.One advertised a tomato-potato plant. For only $7.99, you get a plant that grows tomatoes from its stems and sprouts spuds from its roots.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Sarah Kickler Kelber and Lori Sears and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Staff | May 9, 2004
Say goodbye to the mish-mash of castoff desk, metal filing cabinets and thrown-together shelving in the home office. The Christopher Lowell Collection from Office Depot offers furniture and accessories ranging from desks and chairs to credenzas and lamps coordinated by theme. Town, a cross of traditional and modern design, features frosted glass, Bordeaux wood and steel hardware. Country mixes wood tones, crown molding and leather insets for a more traditional feel. Art Deco and modern Hollywood meet in the City theme, which offers blond wood veneers and hand-detailed fixtures.
NEWS
By Ruth Mullen and Ruth Mullen,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 7, 1999
Nancy Beaubaire brings a writer's flair and an environmentalist's passion to her new post as editor of Organic Gardening magazine. The glossy new redesign rolled off the presses recently as a souped-up version of its former self, full of stunning photography and tips on everything from organic lawns to gardening on the World Wide Web. Long known for its devotion to rural gardeners with large vegetable plots, the 600,000-circulation magazine...
NEWS
By Diane E. Otts and Diane E. Otts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1996
Michelle Potter has always been passionate about the environment. And growing up in a single-parent household, she was always aware of a need to be thrifty. But it wasn't until 1987 that she made a connection between saving the Earth and saving money."When I started to garden organically, doing things like composting and using cayenne pepper and garlic spray to deter pests, I realized that not only were those methods effective and safe for the environment, but also that it was much cheaper than buying chemicals," says Potter, 37, who lives near Guilford.
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