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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
The sprawling farm along Annapolis Road in Gambrills stands as an oasis of rural life in the midst of suburbia. Cows graze beyond the white fence as commuters pass by; farm trucks carry organic produce to local farmers markets. Maryland Sunrise Farm is on 857 acres that served as a dairy operation for the U.S. Naval Academy as recently as the 1990s; midshipmen got their milk straight from the source. Its corn maze is a fall tradition, and residents say the farm is a reminder of Anne Arundel's agricultural past, a marker of history in a fast-growing portion of the county not far from Fort Meade.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
The family that farms a government-owned property in western Anne Arundel County will be able to stay there through at least the end of the year, county officials said Friday. Anne Arundel County is offering a lease to Edwin Fry and his family to continue operating his Maryland Sunrise Farm through Dec. 31 at the site of the former Naval Academy dairy farm in Gambrills. Fry has farmed the land organically for years, but plans to give up organic certification and use conventional fertilizer and herbicides.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 17, 1998
BOSTON -- This is not your everyday political event. How often does a grass-roots movement ask the government to regulate its own enterprise? When was the last time small operators rose up to bitterly complain that government rules and regulations weren't strict enough?But this is the upside-down nature of a food fight that has erupted between the United States Department of Agriculture and the organic farming community.Ever since last December when the USDA released the first-ever proposals for minimum standards for organic foods, a full-scale debate has been raging about the meaning of the "O" word.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
After spending more than two hours last week listening to critics, farmer Edwin Fry said he's open to suggestions of how he might be able to keep the former Navy Academy dairy farm in Gambrills an organic operation. Fry, who leases the land for his Maryland Sunrise Farm, is planning to give up his organic certification from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in order to battle weeds, erosion and other problems on the farm. "I'm open to ideas. I'm not trying to be hard-headed about it," Fry told a crowd of more than 100 people who gathered Tuesday night at a small Baptist church across the street from the farm.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Farmers interested in growing organic feed stocks and exploring new marketing opportunities are encouraged to attend one of two regional workshops sponsored by the Maryland Department of Agriculture. Workshops will cover how to transition to organic grain and forage production, how to become certified organic, ways to maximize the conservation benefits of organic farming and marketing, and funding opportunities. Speakers will include nationally renowned expert John Teasdale of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, and local farmers who have successfully transitioned to organic.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The Navy has received a half-dozen expressions of interest in the Naval Academy's dairy farm property, including proposals for a sand and gravel mine and an organic farming operation, in addition to the horse park plan put forth by the Maryland Stadium Authority. Navy officials sought outside interest after the stadium authority designated the 857-acre Gambrills tract last fall as its preferred site for a proposed horse park. A Navy spokesman declined to identify the six parties that have expressed interest, but four of them confirmed their responses to The Sun. Warren E. "Cookie" Halle, head of Silver Spring-based Halle Enterprises, confirmed that he responded to the Navy's request.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
Picture this: a weekend of hanging out on the grounds of a picturesque farm in Anne Arundel County. You sit with friends on a soft picnic blanket, preparing for the summer concert to begin. And as the sweet country air fills with energy and music, the band's tunes are softly echoed by bucolic harmonies, a series of long and throaty "moooos" from the cows in the audience. Set on the home turf of 250 black Holsteins, the first Horizon Organic Acoustic & Roots Music Festival will take place this weekend in Gambrills.
NEWS
By Ary Bruno and By Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2000
It's a dream many of us have had: to be at the helm of a multimillion dollar enterprise doing work we love. For Maria Rodale, it is no dream, it is her life. And her heritage. Since taking over as editor of Organic Gardening magazine last year, Rodale is well on the way to becoming the voice of a new generation of organic gardeners. But what she wants most, she says, "is to de-mystify organic gardening." "It's fun, easy and safe," says Rodale, 38. "It's not complicated, there are no weird formulas, just common sense.
NEWS
By Mandy Catron and Mandy Catron,BRISTOL HERALD COURIER | August 29, 2002
STICKLEYVILLE, Va. - Sixty-year-old Martin Miles has been farming tobacco since the ripe old age of 6. But a few years ago, he realized he no longer could support himself adequately on the crop to which he'd dedicated his entire working life, and he began to make some changes. "One day, my partner John [Mullins] comes in and says to me, `I think we should grow organics,' and that's where the story changes," Miles said. Today, Miles grows only 5acres of tobacco on his Stickleyville farm, dedicating the rest of his land to organic produce - vegetables grown without toxic fertilizers or sprays.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
A week after the state withdrew its plan to build a $114.2 million horse park at the former Naval Academy Dairy Farm, two other parties that had shown interest in leasing the Gambrills site said yesterday that they are also out of the running. After the Navy closed the two-month bidding period yesterday on the 857-acre property in western Anne Arundel, a spokesman declined to disclose the identities, or even the number, of bidders, but at least three entities - including Anne Arundel County - said they made confidential offers for the land.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
The sprawling farm along Annapolis Road in Gambrills stands as an oasis of rural life in the midst of suburbia. Cows graze beyond the white fence as commuters pass by; farm trucks carry organic produce to local farmers markets. Maryland Sunrise Farm is on 857 acres that served as a dairy operation for the U.S. Naval Academy as recently as the 1990s; midshipmen got their milk straight from the source. Its corn maze is a fall tradition, and residents say the farm is a reminder of Anne Arundel's agricultural past, a marker of history in a fast-growing portion of the county not far from Fort Meade.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Supermarket shoppers in Maryland can't miss the signature blue-and-gold Perdue label on chicken and turkey in the meat section. The Salisbury-based company is the nation's third-largest seller of poultry. That makes it a prime target of environmentalists, who contend "Big Chicken" is fouling the Chesapeake Bay by not taking care of the animal waste produced by the flocks raised for it on thousands of farms across the Delmarva Peninsula. But in supermarkets with garden sections, consumers are likely to run across another product with links to Perdue, one that even environmentalists like — organic fertilizer, made with manure from some of the fowl grown for Perdue and other companies.
NEWS
February 16, 2010
Carroll County officials have put together a committee to hear a dispute between the proprietors of an organic farm and neighbors who say it smells bad, according to a report in the Carroll County Times. Phil and Victoria Snader are the owners of Enviro-Organic Technologies Inc. in Marston. They take natural materials from food processing plants - including spice waste from McCormick and residuals from slaughterhouses - and give them to farmers as an alternative to commercial fertilizers.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Driving on U.S. 40, shoving along with the traffic past strip malls, gas stations and drive-through restaurants, there's no apparent reason to give Nuwood Road, landmarked by an auto supply store, a second glance. But if one did turn in and hang a quick right, he or she would see what could soon become the linchpin for bringing wholesome eating to Baltimore City schools. Tony Geraci, the system's new food service director, plans to turn the 33 surprisingly rural acres in Baltimore County into an organic farm where schoolchildren will learn about healthy food and sustainable living, by digging in the dirt, planting seeds and watching fruits and vegetables come to life.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | January 27, 2008
If you have five acres in the backyard and a Rototiller, you can make a living in organic farming, according to Luke Howard. Howard is chairman of the Maryland Agricultural Commission, a 30-member panel made up of a cross-section of farmers that advises the state agriculture secretary on farm issues. He is an organic farmer and also serves as the industry's representative on the commission. "The organic food industry is growing rapidly and has been growing rapidly for many years," said Howard.
NEWS
January 27, 2008
Farmers interested in growing organic feed stocks and exploring new marketing opportunities are encouraged to attend one of two regional workshops sponsored by the Maryland Department of Agriculture. Workshops will cover how to transition to organic grain and forage production, how to become certified organic, ways to maximize the conservation benefits of organic farming and marketing, and funding opportunities. Speakers will include nationally renowned expert John Teasdale of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, and local farmers who have successfully transitioned to organic.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2000
When Chris and Virginia White of Crownsville got a call last fall from Horizon Organic Dairy, it was like a dream come true. The dairy wanted their design business, Chris White Design Inc., to create exhibits about organic farming on the newly leased Naval Academy Farm land in Gambrills. For the Whites, who eat organic food, the opportunity was perfect. "It was sort of one of those dream jobs that comes along once in a while that really fits in with what we believe in," Virginia White said.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
It is only when you wander around the other side of the barns on the former Naval Academy dairy farm that it becomes clear what the project is all about: hundreds of acres of rye, soybeans and hay growing pesticide-free, and about a half-dozen farm animals being raised without hormones. Horizon Organic Dairy, which opens to the public this weekend, has made a monument to pesticide-free eating, drinking, working and purchasing. One of the gleaming white buildings on the dairy farm is now an educational center, teaching visitors about bovine life, crop rotations and milk's journey from cow to carton.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers are giving organic farmers more respect these days. Manuel Vieira hopes that translates into more tangible help, as well. Vieira grows yams and sweet potatoes organically near Livingston, Calif. He speaks English with the accent of his native Azores Islands and wants Congress to step up its organic investments. "I would like to see more [attention] from the Congress, from the government, paid to the people like myself who are trying to have better food, and a better life," he said yesterday.
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