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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Maryland Shock Trauma Center patients who had previously undergone kidney, liver, lung and other organ transplants recovered as well as the general population, according to a University of Maryland study that experts say demonstrates the resiliency of transplanted organs. But they were more likely than their peers who had not suffered traumatic injuries to later reject transplanted organs, the study found. That raises new questions about the immune response that trauma can trigger and how it affects transplant patients.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday legislation that would allow HIV-infected people to donate their organs to other HIV-infected people for research aimed at eventually making such transplants routine. The HIV Organ Policy Equity, or HOPE, Act lifted a ban on any HIV-infected organ transplants. That ban dated from 1984, when the disease was new, not fully understood and virtually always a death sentence. No other disease, including cancer, universally put an organ off limits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Think of Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry as intellectual magpies. The glittery ideas they filch from fields as diverse as swing dancing, systems analysis, water skiing and medicine seemingly have little in common. But Segev and Gentry weave them together into a strong yet flexible structure designed to protect fragile lives. Segev, 41, is a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a pianist who studied at Juilliard and a former computer prodigy. Gentry, 35, an assistant mathematics professor at the Naval Academy, was a doctoral student when she caught the public's attention by designing a dancing robot.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Maryland Shock Trauma Center patients who had previously undergone kidney, liver, lung and other organ transplants recovered as well as the general population, according to a University of Maryland study that experts say demonstrates the resiliency of transplanted organs. But they were more likely than their peers who had not suffered traumatic injuries to later reject transplanted organs, the study found. That raises new questions about the immune response that trauma can trigger and how it affects transplant patients.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | July 20, 1995
Washington. -- The trouble with the organ-transplant system is that it is based on altruism in a greedy and squeamish country -- a formidable combination when it comes to obtaining permission to extract hearts, lungs and kidneys of dead next-of-kin. As a result, organs from an estimated 10,000 suitable corpses go unused. Meanwhile, about 40,000 people are on waiting lists for hearts and livers at any one time, and a third of them eventually die for lack of organs.The number of needless deaths will inevitably increase as transplant techniques become more sophisticated and applicable to patients now considered too ill for the rigors of the procedure.
NEWS
By Donna Koros Stramella and Donna Koros Stramella,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 21, 2000
THE 15 athletes of Team Maryland have a bond that goes deeper than other competitive teams'. All are acquainted with organ transplants - 13 of them as transplant recipients, and one man as a kidney donor. The team is competing this week in the National Kidney Foundation's U.S. Transplant Games. About 6,000 athletes from across the country are showing their vitality after transplant during the competition at Disney's Wide World of Sports complex near Orlando, Fla. Maryland's squad includes three Anne Arundel County residents: Bruce Brooks of Riva, and Alexis Southworth and Eric Bredehoft, both from Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 11, 2000
BOSTON -- To be frank, it never occurred to me that I have a Boston liver. A Boston accent, yes, I admit to that. But a Boston liver? Or for that matter, a Massachusetts kidney. I've had conversations with my family about organ donation, but not once did I think of donating my body parts to the nearest over the neediest. We may be parochial in New England, but not that parochial. Nevertheless, it turns out that this country has long practiced a highly lethal form of health care: medicine by geography.
NEWS
April 17, 2000
POLITICS rather than good [medicine lies at the heart of a bitter dispute over distrib-uting scarce human organs. People are dying, unnecessarily, as a result. Small hospitals with lucrative trans~plant programs have per-suaded Republicans in Congress to protect their self-interests. This means, the sickest patients await-ing organ transplants don't receive the available organs. It also means that the hospitals with the highest success rates -- in urban centers --are denied donated organs.
NEWS
By WALTER K. GRAHAM | November 9, 1997
It's likely that at least 4,000 patients will die in U.S. hospitals next year as they await organ transplants. This fact makes the need for reliable, accurate information an imperative for patients when they choose a transplant center.This week in Baltimore, the national board of the nation's organ transplant network, the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) will discuss how information about organ-acceptance rates can best help patients. This information is important, but it is only one of several factors that can mean life or death for transplant patients.
NEWS
March 27, 1996
NO STORY about the medical miracles of human organ transplants can skirt the great limitation on these lifesaving procedures: There are more potential recipients of organs than suitable donors.This imbalance is not new, and in some ways things have gotten better. Many people register their willingness to donate on their driver's license and new medicines have allowed the successful use of organs from a wider range of donors. Even so, most of the hard questions that still trouble ethicists about transplants stem from the shortage of donated organs.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
The Air Force service member infected with rabies before his organs were transplanted into several patients — including one Marylander who died — was thought previously to have been poisoned by a type of fish. Kathy Giery, a director at LifeQuest Organ Recovery Services in Gainesville, Fla., said Monday that the organ recovery service oversaw the transplant process from the rabies-infected donor. The hospital where the donor died told the organ service the person was poisoned by ciguatera, a toxin found in certain kinds of fish, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
Think of Dorry Segev and Sommer Gentry as intellectual magpies. The glittery ideas they filch from fields as diverse as swing dancing, systems analysis, water skiing and medicine seemingly have little in common. But Segev and Gentry weave them together into a strong yet flexible structure designed to protect fragile lives. Segev, 41, is a transplant surgeon at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, a pianist who studied at Juilliard and a former computer prodigy. Gentry, 35, an assistant mathematics professor at the Naval Academy, was a doctoral student when she caught the public's attention by designing a dancing robot.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Facebook has launched a program to promote organ donation, which grew from a conversation between the social media company's chief operating officer and a Johns Hopkins surgeon already passionate about the cause. COO Sheryl Sandberg and Dr. Andrew M. Cameron took the chat they had about the shortage of organs at their 20th college reunion at Harvard University and turned it into reality. Facebook announced Tuesday a new organ transplant initiative that could reach hundreds of millions of people around the world.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
The most comprehensive study ever on the link between organ donations and cancer is arming physicians with new data that could help make the procedures safer. Organ transplant patients get new kidneys, livers and lungs that save their lives, but they face a heightened risk of cancer because drugs that prevent the rejection of new organs also weaken the immune system. Most patients, like Jessica Protasio of Columbia, go through with transplants because the immediate risk of dying from failing organs outweighs the long-term risk of cancer.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
The nation has a huge need for kidneys, livers and other organs for transplant, but federal law has one absolute rule for donors: no HIV infections. Some Johns Hopkins doctors now argue that HIV should not disqualify the organs from transplant into recipients who also are already infected with the virus. "If this legal ban were lifted, we could potentially provide organ transplants to every single HIV-infected transplant candidate on the waiting list," says Dr. Dorry L. Segev, an associate professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine whose recent study concluded that there are 500 potential donors disqualified every year.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
A 28-year-old man flown to Maryland six months ago with a failing heart and liver expects to soon return to his Georgia home with healthy new organs, both transplanted during a surgery performed only a dozen other times this year across the country. The rare effort by University of Maryland doctors means David Krech, who was born with a heart defect and has endured many other procedures, may soon be planning a future as a schoolteacher. "The previous operations were stopgap measures, not a cure.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
President Barack Obama signed into law Thursday legislation that would allow HIV-infected people to donate their organs to other HIV-infected people for research aimed at eventually making such transplants routine. The HIV Organ Policy Equity, or HOPE, Act lifted a ban on any HIV-infected organ transplants. That ban dated from 1984, when the disease was new, not fully understood and virtually always a death sentence. No other disease, including cancer, universally put an organ off limits.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | November 21, 2006
Five kidney patients from across the country have received new organs from five unrelated living donors in what doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital called the first five-way kidney swap in medical history. The 10 surgeries took place last week in an all-day marathon that required more than 100 surgeons, nurses and others working simultaneously in five operating rooms. All of the patients were recovering yesterday, and several were wheeled into a news conference, where they expressed gratitude to doctors and donors for a new lease on life - and amazement at the scope of the medical enterprise.
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