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By RICHARD REEVES | April 13, 1993
Independence, Mo. -- One hundred and fifty years ago this week, a couple of hundred families gathered here, building or buying wagons and supplies for a 2,000-mile journey across the plains, the mountains, the deserts and more mountains to a place called Oregon.They were the first of more than 300,000 on the Oregon Trail over a period of 25 years, the Americans who made the United States a continental country.April 15 was a good date to leave. The trick was to leave late enough in the spring to get good grass in Nebraska, but arrive early enough in the winter to beat the snows crossing the Cascades or the Sierra Nevada.
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TRAVEL
November 5, 2006
As a fan of Western lore, I visited Nebraska last summer to follow the Oregon Trail. Thousands of pioneers crossed the state on their way west and visitors can see many of their old campsites. Today freight trains cross Nebraska all day long. Some of the trains are hundreds of cars long and seem to stretch to the horizon, as in this photo I took near Broken Bow. John J. Heyn Owings Mills The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for this page. "My Best Shot" photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture.
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NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | May 3, 1993
Westmoreland, Kan. -- The message is brief, revealing perhaps more about the living than the dead."Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the west."No name. No date on this grave marker near Vermillion Creek just south of Westmoreland.A good guess, however, would be that the traveler died in 1849. And that would lead to a reasonably accurate surmise that cholera was the killer.The reference to "riches" sounds a little disapproving, maybe even smug. The quest might have been for California gold or it could mean the bounty of Oregon.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Friedland and By Bruce Friedland,SUN TRAVEL EDITOR | September 1, 2002
LOOKING AT MY TEEN-AGE daughter and soon-to-be teen-age daughter sitting slouched and sullen at the airport at 6 in the morning, having been rousted before daybreak for a flight to Seattle, I wondered how this vacation would go. I was hoping for a week of family bonding and fun -- a cousin's wedding, a reunion with friends, an excursion to the San Juan Islands and a few days in the city -- but traveling with sometime members of the SDT (Sisterhood of...
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 4, 1995
Lander, Wyoming. -- Off State Route 220, a few miles south of this western town of 7,000 people (which makes it the eighth-largest municipality in Wyoming), a great granite dome rises almost 200 feet out of the dry flatland. ''Independence Rock,'' it has been called since 1830, when a group of fur trappers celebrated the Fourth of July there.Within a few years, there were celebrations each year as hundreds of thousands of Americans on the Oregon Trail went by it between 1840 and 1860. The rock, covering more than 50 acres, can been seen for dozens of miles across a pretty barren landscape.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
The Oregon Trail, that 2,000-mile-long graveyard and lifeline that led to settlement of the Far Northwest, held an irresistible attraction for a Catonsville family this summer.Mother, three daughters and a cousin walked parts of the trail to help commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first large wagon train to head west from Independence, Mo. During the major migration, from 1843 to 1860, more than 300,000 emigrants looking for a better life took to the trail. After that, thousands more followed the rocky, rutted path until shortly before the turn of the century.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
The thousands of Americans who emigrated to the West Coast along the Oregon Trail beginning in the 1840s were not dirt-poor farmers yearning for a new life or reckless adventurers willing to do anything for a thrill. They weren't attacked daily by Indians and they didn't travel in wagon trains a mile long. They didn't bravely go where no man had gone before.That's all myth. The truth is even more fascinating.Much of that truth is on display on "In Search of the Oregon Trail," a compelling, if flawed, documentary airing from 8 p.m.-11 p.m. tonight on MPT, Channels 22 and 67.Most of the immigrants, for example, were at least middle class -- a family of four needed at least $1,000 to complete the 2,000-mile trek from Kansas City to Oregon, no small amount of money back then.
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | January 4, 1998
We'd like to see parts of one of the Old West wagon trails when we take a Western vacation in the spring. Where can we get information?The 400,000 people who rode wagon trains west along the Oregon Trail were very considerate of modern history buffs: They conveniently rolled their wagons through Idaho into Oregon alongside Interstate 84.That's the trail I know most about, and it's an easy one to find and follow. I can't tell you firsthand about the whole route, but I covered 100 miles or so of the trail on a day trip along I-84 out of Boise, Idaho.
NEWS
By Alex Gordon and Alex Gordon,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Seven-year-olds Meggy Breihan and Lucy Pompa gaze wide-eyed at the computer screen as they embark by wagon along the 2,000-mile Oregon Trail."It's fun," Meggy says of the simulated journey through history. "Especially learning about the old days and what people used to do."This summer will be an unusual and exciting one for Meggy, who has cerebral palsy.She is one of 12 youngsters participating this week in a computer club for children with and without disabilities at the LINC (Learning Independence Through Computers Inc.)
TRAVEL
November 5, 2006
As a fan of Western lore, I visited Nebraska last summer to follow the Oregon Trail. Thousands of pioneers crossed the state on their way west and visitors can see many of their old campsites. Today freight trains cross Nebraska all day long. Some of the trains are hundreds of cars long and seem to stretch to the horizon, as in this photo I took near Broken Bow. John J. Heyn Owings Mills The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for this page. "My Best Shot" photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture.
NEWS
By Lesa Jansen and Lesa Jansen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2002
PUPILS AT WINFIELD Elementary School will be exploring the world this month. The school's Geography Club - known as the "Geo Bees" - is sponsoring monthlong activities that will include trivia contests, an explorers' hall of fame, a schoolwide time line and even a daily radio play showcasing fascinating people and places in the world around them. "Geography is the glue that holds all the other subjects together. That's the premise our club was founded on; that geography can be the stepping stone to the world," said Connie Davis, a parent who runs the after-school club.
TRAVEL
January 21, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Oregon, from west to east James C. Cawood Jr. SPECIAL TO THE SUN Unlike the pioneers on the Oregon Trail, we decided this summer to do Oregon from west to east. Viewing the rocks in the Pacific from our small motel room in Bandon, my wife and 8-year-old granddaughter realized on their first trip to the Pacific that it's a far cry from Atlantic beaches. The high that July day was 63 degrees. After heading up the coast to Florence in my quest to see all the museums in the country -- I'm at 93 percent -- we went inland across the coastal range to the college town of Eugene (the university had the best art museum seen on our trip)
FEATURES
By Jean Allen and Jean Allen,SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | January 4, 1998
We'd like to see parts of one of the Old West wagon trails when we take a Western vacation in the spring. Where can we get information?The 400,000 people who rode wagon trains west along the Oregon Trail were very considerate of modern history buffs: They conveniently rolled their wagons through Idaho into Oregon alongside Interstate 84.That's the trail I know most about, and it's an easy one to find and follow. I can't tell you firsthand about the whole route, but I covered 100 miles or so of the trail on a day trip along I-84 out of Boise, Idaho.
NEWS
By Alex Gordon and Alex Gordon,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1996
Seven-year-olds Meggy Breihan and Lucy Pompa gaze wide-eyed at the computer screen as they embark by wagon along the 2,000-mile Oregon Trail."It's fun," Meggy says of the simulated journey through history. "Especially learning about the old days and what people used to do."This summer will be an unusual and exciting one for Meggy, who has cerebral palsy.She is one of 12 youngsters participating this week in a computer club for children with and without disabilities at the LINC (Learning Independence Through Computers Inc.)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
The thousands of Americans who emigrated to the West Coast along the Oregon Trail beginning in the 1840s were not dirt-poor farmers yearning for a new life or reckless adventurers willing to do anything for a thrill. They weren't attacked daily by Indians and they didn't travel in wagon trains a mile long. They didn't bravely go where no man had gone before.That's all myth. The truth is even more fascinating.Much of that truth is on display on "In Search of the Oregon Trail," a compelling, if flawed, documentary airing from 8 p.m.-11 p.m. tonight on MPT, Channels 22 and 67.Most of the immigrants, for example, were at least middle class -- a family of four needed at least $1,000 to complete the 2,000-mile trek from Kansas City to Oregon, no small amount of money back then.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 4, 1995
Lander, Wyoming. -- Off State Route 220, a few miles south of this western town of 7,000 people (which makes it the eighth-largest municipality in Wyoming), a great granite dome rises almost 200 feet out of the dry flatland. ''Independence Rock,'' it has been called since 1830, when a group of fur trappers celebrated the Fourth of July there.Within a few years, there were celebrations each year as hundreds of thousands of Americans on the Oregon Trail went by it between 1840 and 1860. The rock, covering more than 50 acres, can been seen for dozens of miles across a pretty barren landscape.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
Thom Snyder, 11, perished along the Oregon Trail yesterday -- another innocent victim of Giant Food Inc.'s "Apples for the Students" program."I died of a broken leg and the measles," the Perry Hall Elementary School fifth-grader said after his computerized demise. "The pain and the agony!"Thom "died" after 11-year-old classmates Amanda Rumsley and Laurie Risner entered his name into the Baltimore County school's Oregon Trail computer program, which simulates a danger-filled 19th century pioneer trek from Missouri to the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
Thom Snyder, 11, perished along the Oregon Trail yesterday -- another innocent victim of Giant Food Inc.'s "Apples for the Students" program."I died of a broken leg and the measles," the Perry Hall Elementary School fifth-grader said after his computerized demise. "The pain and the agony!"Thom "died" after 11-year-old classmates Amanda Rumsley and Laurie Risner entered his name into the Baltimore County school's Oregon Trail computer program, which simulates a danger-filled 19th century pioneer trek from Missouri to the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
The Oregon Trail, that 2,000-mile-long graveyard and lifeline that led to settlement of the Far Northwest, held an irresistible attraction for a Catonsville family this summer.Mother, three daughters and a cousin walked parts of the trail to help commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first large wagon train to head west from Independence, Mo. During the major migration, from 1843 to 1860, more than 300,000 emigrants looking for a better life took to the trail. After that, thousands more followed the rocky, rutted path until shortly before the turn of the century.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | May 3, 1993
Westmoreland, Kan. -- The message is brief, revealing perhaps more about the living than the dead."Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the west."No name. No date on this grave marker near Vermillion Creek just south of Westmoreland.A good guess, however, would be that the traveler died in 1849. And that would lead to a reasonably accurate surmise that cholera was the killer.The reference to "riches" sounds a little disapproving, maybe even smug. The quest might have been for California gold or it could mean the bounty of Oregon.
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