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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Danielle Edwards did a lot more than lead No. 1 McDonogh with timely offense and stingy defense. The 5-foot-6 junior point guard provided the glue that held the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference champions together on both ends of the floor. Her ability to handle the ball and run the offense made the Eagles (29-2) virtually unpressable and her quickness and anticipation on defense intimidated a lot of opponents. "She's the one piece they cannot do without," Roland Park coach Scott Buckley said, "because she can make their offense go by how well she plays defense.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Danielle Edwards did a lot more than lead No. 1 McDonogh with timely offense and stingy defense. The 5-foot-6 junior point guard provided the glue that held the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference champions together on both ends of the floor. Her ability to handle the ball and run the offense made the Eagles (29-2) virtually unpressable and her quickness and anticipation on defense intimidated a lot of opponents. "She's the one piece they cannot do without," Roland Park coach Scott Buckley said, "because she can make their offense go by how well she plays defense.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | December 31, 2013
McDonogh's Danielle Edwards was named tournament Most Valuable Player after leading the No. 1 Eagles girls basketball team past host St. Elizabeth, 44-29, Monday in the championship game of the St. Francis Healthcare Cup at the 22ndĀ annual Diamond State Classic in Wilmington, Del. The All-Metro point guard scored all of her 13 points in the first half as the Eagles (9-1) won the toughest division at the Classic. Guard Dajah Logan, who had 10 points, was named to the All-Tournament Team.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | December 31, 2013
McDonogh's Danielle Edwards was named tournament Most Valuable Player after leading the No. 1 Eagles girls basketball team past host St. Elizabeth, 44-29, Monday in the championship game of the St. Francis Healthcare Cup at the 22ndĀ annual Diamond State Classic in Wilmington, Del. The All-Metro point guard scored all of her 13 points in the first half as the Eagles (9-1) won the toughest division at the Classic. Guard Dajah Logan, who had 10 points, was named to the All-Tournament Team.
TRAVEL
January 21, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Oregon, from west to east James C. Cawood Jr. SPECIAL TO THE SUN Unlike the pioneers on the Oregon Trail, we decided this summer to do Oregon from west to east. Viewing the rocks in the Pacific from our small motel room in Bandon, my wife and 8-year-old granddaughter realized on their first trip to the Pacific that it's a far cry from Atlantic beaches. The high that July day was 63 degrees. After heading up the coast to Florence in my quest to see all the museums in the country -- I'm at 93 percent -- we went inland across the coastal range to the college town of Eugene (the university had the best art museum seen on our trip)
FEATURES
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 1996
Could it be that we're too late?Here we are rolling in from the Portland, Ore., airport, just in time, we figure, to see the flowering of America's next Great Place, the emergence of Portland as the city that's cooler, greener, smaller and cheaper than the last Great Place, which I believe was somewhere north of here, on the coast. Portland, we understand, is nourished by coffee, beer and books, neighbored by forest and rivers, a damp promised land.But our taxi hasn't crossed the Willamette River yet, and Khalid the driver is already deep into an explanation of how Portland has gone to the dogs.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | March 21, 2007
Brian Burres knows he's a long shot to make the bullpen, even if the Orioles keep a second left-hander. But he'll report to Triple-A Norfolk and attempt to rejoin the team later. He appeared in 11 games as a rookie last season after being claimed off waivers from the San Francisco Giants and receiving a September call-up, allowing two runs in eight innings. He's probably better remembered for having a nosebleed during one of his appearances. Is your hometown of Oregon City, Ore., considered a baseball hotbed?
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | February 10, 2002
I was "Portland dreaming" on a winter's day, fantasizing about eating my way through the Oregon city. There were a couple of reasons for this. First of all, it was February in Baltimore, a time of year when a lot of folks spend a lot of time daydreaming about being somewhere else. Secondly, I had been in Oregon a few months ago and had enjoyed a delicious visit. Thirdly, an article about Portland in the January 2002 issue of Gourmet magazine was feeding the fires of my imagination. There, in full color splendor, were photos of the fat berries, plump seafood, golden breads, local mushrooms, and the lush wines and fruits that are part of the city's daily menu.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2002
Elsie Plummer of Baltimore wrote: "I am looking for a good cream of crab soup recipe and if anyone has one, I'd love to have it." Evelyn Picker of Arbutus responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. The recipe Picker responded with is from the Relay Elementary School PTA Anniversary cookbook from Debbie Massimini. Recipe requests Alice Richards of Rohnert Park, Calif., wants to recover a recipe she treasured many years ago. "I read your column in the Press Democrat of Rohnert Park. I want a hot-milk spongecake recipe like that printed on the outside of a Swans Down cake-flour box that was discontinued.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court scanned the constitutional horizon yesterday for a way to protect private property rights and the environment at the same time, but found itself focusing on the minute technicalities of an Oregon town's laws.Demonstrating that a major ruling sometimes depends heavily upon how the justices see minor facts, the court pored over the details of a small-town scrap between an elderly woman's family business and the government of the Portland suburb of Tigard.The town is demanding a piece of the woman's land to be used for a green "buffer" and a bicycle and walking path in return for a permit to build a new plumbing goods store.
TRAVEL
January 21, 2001
A MEMORABLE PLACE Oregon, from west to east James C. Cawood Jr. SPECIAL TO THE SUN Unlike the pioneers on the Oregon Trail, we decided this summer to do Oregon from west to east. Viewing the rocks in the Pacific from our small motel room in Bandon, my wife and 8-year-old granddaughter realized on their first trip to the Pacific that it's a far cry from Atlantic beaches. The high that July day was 63 degrees. After heading up the coast to Florence in my quest to see all the museums in the country -- I'm at 93 percent -- we went inland across the coastal range to the college town of Eugene (the university had the best art museum seen on our trip)
FEATURES
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 1996
Could it be that we're too late?Here we are rolling in from the Portland, Ore., airport, just in time, we figure, to see the flowering of America's next Great Place, the emergence of Portland as the city that's cooler, greener, smaller and cheaper than the last Great Place, which I believe was somewhere north of here, on the coast. Portland, we understand, is nourished by coffee, beer and books, neighbored by forest and rivers, a damp promised land.But our taxi hasn't crossed the Willamette River yet, and Khalid the driver is already deep into an explanation of how Portland has gone to the dogs.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
The Oregon Trail, that 2,000-mile-long graveyard and lifeline that led to settlement of the Far Northwest, held an irresistible attraction for a Catonsville family this summer.Mother, three daughters and a cousin walked parts of the trail to help commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first large wagon train to head west from Independence, Mo. During the major migration, from 1843 to 1860, more than 300,000 emigrants looking for a better life took to the trail. After that, thousands more followed the rocky, rutted path until shortly before the turn of the century.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | August 17, 2007
The first time Midshipman Taylor Brashear tried his hand at landing a small airplane his insides jiggled around and he tried to ignore what sounded like extremely loud breathing on his headphones. Before he knew it, the Cessna had touched down, and then, he was up in the air again, preparing for another maneuver. As the plane took off from Tipton Airport in Odenton a few weeks ago, at least two things were clear: He hadn't aced the landing or the takeoff, and he realized he loved flying just as much as he thought he would.
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