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By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Slow Man J.M. Coetzee Viking / 208 pages Slow Man, the latest novel by South African Nobel laureate J.M. Coetzee, opens unpromisingly with a street accident. Paul Rayment, an aging, retired photographer, an ordinary man of less-than-ordinary interest, is hit by a car while riding his bicycle in downtown Adelaide, Australia. A doctor indifferent to those on the far side of life hacks off his leg above the knee. Paul soon becomes obsessed with his nurse-caregiver, a "tubby" Croatian immigrant named Marijana.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 8, 1991
"Never Forget" is almost terrific.But it's a big almost.The two-hour docudrama, airing at 8 tonight on cable channel TNT, stars Leonard Nimoy as Mel Mermelstein, a real person who survived the Holocaust in Europe in the 1940s and then, 40 years later, took on a group in California who tried to deny that the Holocaust happened.The revisionist group, called the Institute for Historical Review, be came aware of Mermelstein after he wrote letters to newspapers in California objecting to articles that treated their position seriously.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
Governor Oz is at it again ("O'Malley to push stricter gun limits," Jan. 15). Other than distracting law enforcement and regulatory personnel from their worthwhile efforts and imposing fruitless burdens on them and costs on the people of Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley's fanciful legislative scheme will have no significant effect on gun crime, especially in Baltimore. His proposed assault weapons ban, like the Federal ban from 1994 to 2004, will have no positive impact. Of the 217 people murdered in Baltimore last year, none were killed by "assault weapons" or guns with "high-capacity magazines," as those terms will be defined legislatively.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
Governor Oz is at it again ("O'Malley to push stricter gun limits," Jan. 15). Other than distracting law enforcement and regulatory personnel from their worthwhile efforts and imposing fruitless burdens on them and costs on the people of Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley's fanciful legislative scheme will have no significant effect on gun crime, especially in Baltimore. His proposed assault weapons ban, like the Federal ban from 1994 to 2004, will have no positive impact. Of the 217 people murdered in Baltimore last year, none were killed by "assault weapons" or guns with "high-capacity magazines," as those terms will be defined legislatively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
From The Dust Returned, by Ray Bradbury. William Morrow. 204 pages. $23. Ray Bradbury, our most beloved science fiction writer, writes in the "afterword" to his 30th book that his stories have been "tales of men who discovered the skeleton inside themselves and were terrified of that skeleton." Even on Mars, you cannot escape yourself. No matter the galaxies you traverse, you are always here. As practiced by Bradbury, by Philip K. Dick, by Issac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein, by Ursula Le Guin and all the masters, classic science fiction is utopian, indignant.
NEWS
By Adam Michnik | November 24, 1990
Warsaw.---LECH WALESA wants to be president, and I do not blame him for this ambition. It worries me, however, that he wants to be an ''ax-wielding'' president who rules by decree and who likens democracy to a driver's control over a car. ''Now that we are changing the system, we need a president with an ax: a firm, shrewd and simple man, who does not beat around the bush.'' These are Mr. Walesa's words.What worries me more than his words, however, is the way he treats Solidarity as an instrument for the fulfillment of his personal ambitions.
NEWS
By Jack Stephens | November 15, 1992
LEVIATHAN.Paul Auster.Viking.275 pages. $21.7/8 There is a well-known lithograph by M. C. Escher of a hand drawing the hand that's drawing it. Such an enactment of artistic creation, paradoxical as it is, succeeds in excluding its "real" artist by more than just clever design; it has to be true to itself.When a work of art works by becoming its own originator we get that nearly mystical feeling that art does breed art, and ideas ideas, and that no matter what rein the artist (writer) thinks he has on the work, it does have a life of its own. As Peter Aaron, the novelist/narrator of Paul Auster's latest novel puts it: "No one can say where a book comes from, least of all the person who writes it. Books are born out of ignorance, and if they go on living after they are written, it's only to the degree that they cannot be understood."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Throughout much of our history, our presidents have tried to convince us that they are ordinary people.This may have started when George Washington refused to be addressed as "Your Highness" and opted for "Mr. President" instead.By 1840, William Henry Harrison was campaigning for president as a homespun man of the people. In the first recorded use of political "image" advertising, he used a log cabin and a cider barrel on his posters to remind people that he was a down-home kind of guy.In reality, Harrison lived in a Georgian mansion and owned 2,000 lush acres farmed by tenant farmers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Slow Man J.M. Coetzee Viking / 208 pages Slow Man, the latest novel by South African Nobel laureate J.M. Coetzee, opens unpromisingly with a street accident. Paul Rayment, an aging, retired photographer, an ordinary man of less-than-ordinary interest, is hit by a car while riding his bicycle in downtown Adelaide, Australia. A doctor indifferent to those on the far side of life hacks off his leg above the knee. Paul soon becomes obsessed with his nurse-caregiver, a "tubby" Croatian immigrant named Marijana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | November 11, 2001
From The Dust Returned, by Ray Bradbury. William Morrow. 204 pages. $23. Ray Bradbury, our most beloved science fiction writer, writes in the "afterword" to his 30th book that his stories have been "tales of men who discovered the skeleton inside themselves and were terrified of that skeleton." Even on Mars, you cannot escape yourself. No matter the galaxies you traverse, you are always here. As practiced by Bradbury, by Philip K. Dick, by Issac Asimov, and Robert Heinlein, by Ursula Le Guin and all the masters, classic science fiction is utopian, indignant.
NEWS
By George Minot and George Minot,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
In matters of religion (the word comes from religare: to tie back, tie up, tie fast), it's best to proclaim a few preliminary prejudices. As a card-carrying, dues-paying (but not tithing) Presbyterian - one of the few, the proud: God's frozen chosen - I confess to being nothing more than a domestic wayfarer. I'm a regular traveler, who, like Ulysses, made a good many journeys when young and then came home, full of experience and half-wisdom, ready to live out a real life in a community.Surely, it's the sacred and profane buzz of everyday activity that gives human life its rigor and imagination and meaning.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Throughout much of our history, our presidents have tried to convince us that they are ordinary people.This may have started when George Washington refused to be addressed as "Your Highness" and opted for "Mr. President" instead.By 1840, William Henry Harrison was campaigning for president as a homespun man of the people. In the first recorded use of political "image" advertising, he used a log cabin and a cider barrel on his posters to remind people that he was a down-home kind of guy.In reality, Harrison lived in a Georgian mansion and owned 2,000 lush acres farmed by tenant farmers.
NEWS
By Jack Stephens | November 15, 1992
LEVIATHAN.Paul Auster.Viking.275 pages. $21.7/8 There is a well-known lithograph by M. C. Escher of a hand drawing the hand that's drawing it. Such an enactment of artistic creation, paradoxical as it is, succeeds in excluding its "real" artist by more than just clever design; it has to be true to itself.When a work of art works by becoming its own originator we get that nearly mystical feeling that art does breed art, and ideas ideas, and that no matter what rein the artist (writer) thinks he has on the work, it does have a life of its own. As Peter Aaron, the novelist/narrator of Paul Auster's latest novel puts it: "No one can say where a book comes from, least of all the person who writes it. Books are born out of ignorance, and if they go on living after they are written, it's only to the degree that they cannot be understood."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 8, 1991
"Never Forget" is almost terrific.But it's a big almost.The two-hour docudrama, airing at 8 tonight on cable channel TNT, stars Leonard Nimoy as Mel Mermelstein, a real person who survived the Holocaust in Europe in the 1940s and then, 40 years later, took on a group in California who tried to deny that the Holocaust happened.The revisionist group, called the Institute for Historical Review, be came aware of Mermelstein after he wrote letters to newspapers in California objecting to articles that treated their position seriously.
NEWS
By George Minot and George Minot,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
In matters of religion (the word comes from religare: to tie back, tie up, tie fast), it's best to proclaim a few preliminary prejudices. As a card-carrying, dues-paying (but not tithing) Presbyterian - one of the few, the proud: God's frozen chosen - I confess to being nothing more than a domestic wayfarer. I'm a regular traveler, who, like Ulysses, made a good many journeys when young and then came home, full of experience and half-wisdom, ready to live out a real life in a community.Surely, it's the sacred and profane buzz of everyday activity that gives human life its rigor and imagination and meaning.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
NEWS
By Adam Michnik | November 24, 1990
Warsaw.---LECH WALESA wants to be president, and I do not blame him for this ambition. It worries me, however, that he wants to be an ''ax-wielding'' president who rules by decree and who likens democracy to a driver's control over a car. ''Now that we are changing the system, we need a president with an ax: a firm, shrewd and simple man, who does not beat around the bush.'' These are Mr. Walesa's words.What worries me more than his words, however, is the way he treats Solidarity as an instrument for the fulfillment of his personal ambitions.
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