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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
When M.P. Mariappan was born 95 years ago, England's King George V was emperor of India. Mahatma Gandhi hadn't yet taken up India's struggle for independence. Most Indians lived in small, scattered villages instead of in cities. Mariappan survived plague, the Great Depression, World War II and a 1,700-mile death trek from Burma, where he was living at the time, to his homeland. He became a respected fruit merchant who struggled to educate his eight children, boosting the family decisively from their lowly caste and into the middle class.
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FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | August 3, 1994
"I am interested in reality, with the texture of ordinary life, and the way people appear and relate. I like to write about survivors." This is Carol Shields speaking about writing and providing a framework from which to view "The Stone Diaries."Ms. Shields, a poet and novelist, has won numerous awards, and "The Stone Diaries" is a finalist for the prestigious Booker Prize. Although Ms. Shields has not received the critical acclaim that fellow Canadian Margaret Atwood has, her books seem to me as accomplished and as elegant, perhaps more so.A structurally flawless novel told as memoir, "The Stone Diaries" holds photographs, a family tree, letters, invitations, news clippings and other such autobiographical details.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2007
It's the oldest kind of story: Somebody ventures deep into the woods and comes back with a tale. Here Roy Jacobstein returns to America to relate his experience on a safari to the place believed by archaeologists to be the original site of human life. And against this ancient backdrop he closes with a suggestion of the brevity of our lives. - Ted Kooser "Safari, Rift Valley" Minutes ago those quick cleft hoofs lifted the dik-dik's speckled frame. Now the cheetah dips her delicate head to the still-pulsating guts.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 16, 1995
HAVRE De GRACE -- ''Life's but a knife edge,'' observes the cattle baron Charles Goodnight near the end of Larry McMurtry's ''Streets of Laredo.'' ''Sooner of later, people slip and get cut.''They sure-enough do, in ordinary life as well as in cowboy novels like Mr. McMurtry's. But in ordinary life in the Clintonian era, such slips are invariably considered to be violations of certain vague rights, and thus provide prime opportunities for plaintiffs' lawyers to enrich themselves in the name of justice.
NEWS
By Evelyn Flory | October 11, 1996
IN INGMAR BERGMAN'S movie classic, ''The Seventh Seal,'' a simple-minded young actor witnesses a miracle: While journeying through an unremarkable stretch of rural, medieval Sweden, in the early morning before he is fully awake, he catches in the dappled sunlight a glimpse of the Virgin and Child.Though brief, the vision is certain, joyful and transforming. In fact, as it later happens, the vision saves his life and that of his wife and child.That moment, when the young man's everyday vision and the ordinary meadow are illuminated by the touch of transcendent glory, might be understood as an emblem of the way in which art transforms life.
NEWS
March 11, 2002
HERS WAS an ordinary life. For 44 years, Treva K. Walkling waited on tables and lunch counters. She started in 1930 at the Purity Creamery at Lexington and Paca. She wore a starched white uniform (size 14), a white apron and sturdy, lace-up, white nursing shoes. She served fried oysters, Polish ham and the hot plate special to shoppers and merchants from nearby Lexington Market. She pinned a pen on a retractable chain to her uniform and stashed tips in a paper cup on which she had scrawled her name: Miss Treva.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Said Rifai and Borzou Daragahi and Said Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Within the dense warren of shops and storefronts of the Shorja market ordinary life drummed along yesterday morning. Security guard Abdul-Ameer Mohammed stood at his post in front of a bank. Nail Ahmed, owner of a porcelain pottery store in the market, took a break and shopped for spices for his wife. Maytham Qazzaz, a plastics and nylon merchant, worked the phones. Then the explosions erupted, yet another in a series of attacks on crowded Baghdad marketplaces. Ordinary life became engulfed in fire, twisted metal, collapsed buildings, shattered glass, black smoke and blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 7, 2002
'An Extraordinary, Ordinary Life' The life of "Miss Treva," a 20th-century working-class woman from Baltimore, will be explored in an exhibit opening today in celebration of Women's History Month at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St. "An Extraordinary, Ordinary Life: The Life and Times of Miss Treva K. Walkling" features notable objects saved by Walkling (1907-1997) that illustrate her life and 47-year career as a waitress, as well as her love of travel, horse racing and dogs.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Jessica Long will tell you: After capturing even more Paralympic gold in London, she couldn't wait to get back to Baltimore for a table heavy with steamed crabs and a pint of Ben & Jerry's. But these days, Long's reality is a touch more glamorous. You can still find the swimmer at the movies in White Marsh, shopping at the Towson Town Center, getting wet at the Merritt Athletic Club. But Long's just as likely to be walking a red carpet somewhere in couture threads, juggling interview requests and considering lucrative opportunities.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | June 24, 2007
It's the oldest kind of story: Somebody ventures deep into the woods and comes back with a tale. Here Roy Jacobstein returns to America to relate his experience on a safari to the place believed by archaeologists to be the original site of human life. And against this ancient backdrop he closes with a suggestion of the brevity of our lives. - Ted Kooser "Safari, Rift Valley" Minutes ago those quick cleft hoofs lifted the dik-dik's speckled frame. Now the cheetah dips her delicate head to the still-pulsating guts.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Said Rifai and Borzou Daragahi and Said Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Within the dense warren of shops and storefronts of the Shorja market ordinary life drummed along yesterday morning. Security guard Abdul-Ameer Mohammed stood at his post in front of a bank. Nail Ahmed, owner of a porcelain pottery store in the market, took a break and shopped for spices for his wife. Maytham Qazzaz, a plastics and nylon merchant, worked the phones. Then the explosions erupted, yet another in a series of attacks on crowded Baghdad marketplaces. Ordinary life became engulfed in fire, twisted metal, collapsed buildings, shattered glass, black smoke and blood.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 6, 2004
WASHINGTON -- All these tourists, wilting in the steam-bath afternoon heat as they arrive at the steps of the glistening U.S. Capitol, are turned away long before they can get near the building. They should know better by now. There are iron barriers around the place, and roadblocks everywhere, and heavily armed police inspecting vehicles at checkpoints all over town. "Used to be, you could just walk into this building," a visitor says. "Used to be," replies Officer Brian Doninger, one of a team of police guarding the Capitol's steep back stairway.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2002
The two robust young women with friendly faces went to the same middle school in Hampden and laughingly refer to their friendship in Baltimore's workaday world as "life without parole." They make minimum wage working the night shift in the same Subway sandwich shop on 28th and Sisson streets, a short walk from their homes. Neither has a car. One dreams of becoming a nurse. The other is a married mother of two who would love to model for Gothic Beauty magazine. At work, both wear ponytails and purple uniform shirts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier | September 1, 2002
When the American poet William Carlos Williams wrote, "It is difficult / to get the news from poems / yet men die miserably every day / for lack / of what is found there," he was pointing out that although poems do not provide us with the daily journalistic information we crave, they carry a kind of news that might offer solace and respite in the face of difficulty and even misery. Williams' claim for poetry is really a claim for poetry's ability to elevate the human spirit and imagination above the prosaic conditions of our age. The poems in A. Van Jordan's Rise come as close as poems can to telling both the news of the moment and the truth of the human spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
"South of the Border, West of the Sun," by Haruki Murakami, translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel. Knopf. 205 pages. $22.Hajime, a Japanese everyman, recounts his romantic life. "South of the Border, West of the Sun" seems light years from the historical inevitabilities of "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle," Haruki Murakami's most recent novel, not to mention the intrigues of the unconscious of his masterpiece "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World."Yet this new mesmerizing example of Murakami's deeply original fiction is equally allegorical.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 7, 1995
Boston -- These are days when even the people who pose for PowerBook ads don't want to take their laptop to the beach. Or travel the Internet in their hammock.It's high summer and what everyone needs isn't a home page, but a page-turner. The best way to give your mind a workout while your body gets a rest is to indulge in that wonderfully non-aerobic exercise called summer reading.So in this spirit, I perform my annual public service for readers who might otherwise be seduced into finally buying ''The Bridges of Madison County,'' thereby keeping it on the best-seller list for yet another -- 153rd (!
NEWS
March 11, 2002
HERS WAS an ordinary life. For 44 years, Treva K. Walkling waited on tables and lunch counters. She started in 1930 at the Purity Creamery at Lexington and Paca. She wore a starched white uniform (size 14), a white apron and sturdy, lace-up, white nursing shoes. She served fried oysters, Polish ham and the hot plate special to shoppers and merchants from nearby Lexington Market. She pinned a pen on a retractable chain to her uniform and stashed tips in a paper cup on which she had scrawled her name: Miss Treva.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 7, 2002
'An Extraordinary, Ordinary Life' The life of "Miss Treva," a 20th-century working-class woman from Baltimore, will be explored in an exhibit opening today in celebration of Women's History Month at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St. "An Extraordinary, Ordinary Life: The Life and Times of Miss Treva K. Walkling" features notable objects saved by Walkling (1907-1997) that illustrate her life and 47-year career as a waitress, as well as her love of travel, horse racing and dogs.
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