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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 29, 2010
The Archdiocese of Baltimore filed a federal lawsuit against the city Monday, saying a first-in-the-nation ordinance regulating pregnancy counseling centers violates the rights of church members to freedom of speech and religion. Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien said the law, which took effect in January, "is hurting the good people volunteering and giving so much of their resources to come to the help of pregnant women." It requires the centers, some of which are supported by the Catholic Church, to post signs stating that they do not refer women for abortion or birth control.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 16, 2010
Food stores and restaurants in Baltimore would be barred from giving away disposable plastic bags under a bill to be considered by City Council, unless the merchants join a program to encourage their customers to recycle or shop with reusable bags. Putting aside earlier proposals to ban disposable plastic bags outright or levy a 25-cent fee on them, the council's Judiciary and Legislative Investigations Committee approved, 3-0 with two members absent, what members have dubbed a "mandatory-voluntary" approach.
NEWS
By Charles Schelle Patuxent Publications | February 24, 2010
Carroll County should have its first speed cameras installed this year after the Sykesville Town Council's vote this week. At its meeting at the Town House and after a second public hearing, the council voted 5-1 in favor of speed cameras. "I'm ecstatic," Police Chief John Williams Jr. told The Carroll Eagle. "Time and time again, the No. 1 issue in our town is speeding, speeding, speeding." The ordinance will take effect in 21 days, Town Manager Matt Candland said.
NEWS
January 19, 2010
In regard to Paul West's article in Sunday's Sun, "The battle is joined in Queen Anne's" (Jan. 17), I would like to add a few comments. As trustee of my family's farm, which borders the Hunt Ray farm where the proposed Foreign Affairs Training Center is proposed to be built, I am legally bound to protect the interest and value of our farm. Those interests are threatened by the proposed facility in the following ways. My greatest concern is for the safety of my two children who play outside of our back door only 500 yards from where ordinance will be tested.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 17, 2009
On Aug. 18 at 4:30 p.m., Chang K. Yim rolled down the two corrugated metal doors to his liquor store on North Avenue and secured each with locks. Doing the work himself and a half-hour before deadline, he avoided the spectacle of his store being padlocked by a police commander with television cameras rolling. This was the first test of police enforcing the city padlock ordinance that allowed Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to keep Linden Bar and Liquors in Reservoir Hill closed for up to a year.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Rona Marech and Nicole Fuller and Rona Marech,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com and rona.marech@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Besides voting on the presidential and congressional races on Tuesday, Anne Arundel County voters will decide on two county-specific ballot questions - and for the first time - a retention vote on two county school board members. The board members are Tricia L. Johnson, who is currently serving her second five-year term as an at-large member, and Teresa Milio Birge, who joined the board in July, representing District 32. The vote comes after lawmakers revamped the school board appointment process, which was previously decided by gubernatorial appointment.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 20, 2008
Two women blocked from ordination as United Methodist ministers because one is a married lesbian and the other disagrees with church rules on gay rights received "extraordinary ordination" in Baltimore yesterday. Organizers said it was the first such action by dissenters hoping to change Methodist policies toward gays. Neither woman will be eligible for assignments to lead Methodist churches under existing policies, but they both believe their new credentials will make them eligible for other jobs within the church, or as ministers in other denominations.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 2, 2008
Sports journalism doesn't normally get tangled up in First Amendment issues. But a pair of sports-related situations that have come up recently pose interesting parallels. The first is in China (where, admittedly, the concept of the First Amendment is pretty alien), but the second is in Phoenix, where they should have heard of it. *In China, at the Beijing Olympics, reporters are being barred from some Internet access, particularly Web sites that the government believes to be critical of its policies, such as discussion of the unrest in Tibet.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 19, 2008
Baseball Astros@Orioles 7 p.m. [MASN] The Orioles are hoping Brian Burres can pitch his way out of the funk he has been in lately. In his past four starts, Burres has an ERA of 12.00, giving up 24 earned runs in 18 innings. Amazingly, the Orioles won three of those four games. Houston's scheduled starter is Shawn Chacon (2-2), who has been erratic after a decent April.
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