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NEWS
July 21, 2010
If the city is so much in need of money, there is one place for the mayor to look: A few years back, a law was passed to stop the posting of signs on public property and providing a fine to be levied for each sign that has to be removed. The neighborhood conditions prompting the ordinance have returned with a vengeance. The signs are everywhere -- on traffic and light poles, parkland and median strips. How about it Mayor and City Council? Richard L. Lelonek, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
After investing $700,000 to renovate a struggling White Marsh motel and restaurant he bought two years ago, Ronald Parker was worried that a battle over the decades-old sign could cost him his business. Parker, a 67-year-old attorney who lives in Harford County, lost a Baltimore County administrative hearing earlier this year after a resident reported that signs at the business, the Williamsburg Inn on U.S. 40, were too large and didn't conform to current county standards. "To me, it's ludicrous," Parker said.
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EXPLORE
November 10, 2012
The Board of County Commissioners has rescheduled its public hearing on the proposal to designate English as the official language of Carroll County to Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. in the County Office Building, 225 North Center St., Westminster. The hearing had been scheduled for late October, but was postponed because of Hurricane Sandy. This ordinance, if passed, would recognize English as the language in which all official county business will be conducted. After the hearing, the commissioners may make amendments to the proposed ordinance based on the comments received.
NEWS
By Matt Bowman | June 23, 2014
What if any time a citizen spoke at a city council meeting to oppose a policy, the city could later order the citizen to go to court, produce all his private emails, and be interrogated by the city's lawyer? That would be a great policy … if your goal was to suppress citizen participation in the democratic process and let corrupt government officials do whatever they want because the people are too afraid to watch over Big Brother's shoulder. Yet that is what the city of Baltimore is trying to do right now to non-profit organizations that oppose abortion - and that are not even located in Baltimore or Maryland.
NEWS
By Charles Schelle Patuxent Publications | February 24, 2010
Carroll County should have its first speed cameras installed this year after the Sykesville Town Council's vote this week. At its meeting at the Town House and after a second public hearing, the council voted 5-1 in favor of speed cameras. "I'm ecstatic," Police Chief John Williams Jr. told The Carroll Eagle. "Time and time again, the No. 1 issue in our town is speeding, speeding, speeding." The ordinance will take effect in 21 days, Town Manager Matt Candland said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A federal court judge has approved a settlement between Ocean City and a spray paint artist, changing the town code so that it no longer violates the free-speech rights of street performers. On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge L. Ellen Hollander signed the consent decree, which was submitted by both parties last week. It allows writers, painters, performers, sculptors, musicians and others to sell their works along the boardwalk without fear of interference by police. Those who sell manufactured goods such as candles, stuffed animals and sunglasses are not included in the protected class.
EXPLORE
December 13, 2012
We don't need the state of Maryland telling Howard County what we can and can't do with our noise ordinances. If it is so important an issue to the state that venues not have any noise restrictions, why does this bill only apply to Howard County? The Howard County delegation is considering a state bill to "not prohibit the electronic amplification of sound between the hours of 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. at an outdoor concert venue with a capacity of over 15,000 individuals. " Not just Merriweather: any venue that might be built Howard County near you and your family.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that Baltimore cannot require faith-based pregnancy counseling centers to post disclaimers noting they won't assist clients in receiving abortions or birth control. The three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., voted 2-1 to uphold a lower court's ruling that the ordinance was unconstitutional - drawing praise from Catholic leaders who had opposed the ordinance and a defense of the law from MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, its original sponsor.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
The Sykesville Town Council has introduced an ordinance that would require anyone riding a bicycle to wear a helmet.The proposed ordinance, introduced Monday, would set a fine for first-time offenders at $25, but the fine could be waived if the person bought a helmet within 30 days of the violation. The fine for a second offense would be $50.For subsequent offenses, the fine would be $75 and impoundment of the bike until the fine was paid. A $10 impounding fee and proof of purchase of a helmet would be required to recover the bike.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Downtown Annapolis residents urged the city council last night to pass a public disturbance ordinance to deliver their neighborhood from weekend bar-hoppers whose rowdy behavior often rattles the peace.The ordinance, sponsored by Mayor Dean L. Johnson and Ward One Democratic Alderman Louise Hammond, would tighten public disturbance laws by making a misdemeanor the acts of: "yelling, shouting, hooting, making rude remarks, whistling or singing on or near the public streets so as to unreasonably disturb the peace."
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 15, 2014
The Laurel City Council voted Monday to approve the latest version of an ordinance regulating the appearance and dispersement of street-side donation bins throughout the city. The approval is a long time coming for the ordinance, which was introduced to the council last summer. The original iteration of the bill was tabled by the council after objections from bin operators in the city, most notably from the Elkridge-based nonprofit Planet Aid. A donation bin is an unattended container placed by organizations, traditionally nonprofits, for the purpose of collecting unwanted material goods, like textiles, shoes, clothes, etc. The collection agency then repurposes the donated goods.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
Any time new development is proposed in Howard County, opponents invariably look to challenge it based on the increased traffic it will bring or, in the case of housing construction, the pressure it would have on the school population. Their argument is often based on the county's adequate public facilities ordinance, APFO for short, which was established in 1992 to make sure that roads, public sewer and schools in a particular area have enough capacity before a development can be approved.
NEWS
April 10, 2014
Last week, the media finally reported that the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance in Howard County needs updating, and even then only because the two county executive candidates started talking about it ( "County executive candidates to revisit public facilities requirements," April 4). The media has ignored until now what others have long been talking about. The current ordinance can slow development if elementary schools and nearby street intersections are not ready to handle the increased load.
NEWS
By Jeff Fraley | July 29, 2013
Baltimore businesses, homeowners and nonprofits took on new financial responsibility July 1 with enactment of the city's Stormwater Remediation Fee ordinance. Much media has been generated around the unfunded mandate handed down from Annapolis to the 10 largest counties around the Chesapeake Bay. Yet, based on fiscal reality, including the cash to be collected and spent, little has been written about the disproportionate impact on Baltimore City businesses and the latest layering of fees atop already hefty property taxes.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 25, 2013
Two weeks after delaying action on an ordinance that would regulate the spread of donation bins throughout the city of Laurel, the City Council voted on Monday, July 22, to indefinitely table the ordinance after bin proprietors took issue. "This basically kills the bill," said Mayor Craig Moe. "We are going back to the drawing board. " The ordinance, if passed, would have regulated the spread of donation bins within the city by requiring all collection agencies that deploy bins to apply for permits within the city's Department of Community Planning and Business Services.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
Two recent Sun pieces ( Susan Reimer 's column "Annapolis whiffs on City Dock again," July 11, Mayor Josh Cohen's op-ed, "City Dock plans restores luster of Annapolis' crown jewel," July 18) both about the Annapolis City Dock, questioned the motives of those who have asked questions about the plan and who are trying to slow down a rush to pass a massive ordinance (07-13) to implement an incomplete plan. The ordinance would set up a new maritime zone that is maritime in name only, as the uses allowed in this "maritime zone" are furniture stores, hotels, ice skating rinks and much more.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 24, 1993
BOSTON -- A judge has struck down a Boston ordinanc requiring most businesses that serve alcohol to have condom vending machines on their premises.Judge Harold Flannery, in a ruling Monday from Suffolk Superior Court, concluded the City Council overstepped its powers when it passed the law in December, over Mayor Raymond Flynn's veto.In passing the ordinance, the City Council declared a public health emergency existed and the law was intended to fight the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1995
The Hampstead Town Council last week adopted two ordinances aimed at slowing growth by listing the conditions developers must meet to obtain preliminary and final approval for construction.Since July, town officials have tried to draft legislation ensuring that new development does not adversely effect schools or outpace the town's ability to provide adequate facilities, such as water and sewer.The most controversial of the ordinances, No. 269, was passed with two amendments.The first was an addition to a section of the ordinance listing 17 provisions for final plan approval, including written certification to the town's planning and zoning commission that adequate space in schools would serve a planned subdivision.
NEWS
By Joshua J. Cohen | July 18, 2013
Many of Annapolis' established downtown interests seem to reflexively resist change. Annapolitans even have a name for it: the Downtown "No" Club. The latest version of this "No" Club is the self-described Coalition to Save Annapolis, an unusual alliance of United States Yacht Shows, the Ward One Residents Association, the Annapolis Business Association, Historic Annapolis Inc. and others. These groups are united by their opposition to a rezoning ordinance I introduced to implement Phase One of a City Dock Master Plan that has been more than two years in the making.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
A dispute over zoning at the Annapolis City Dock may lead to unintended consequences detrimental to the long-term vitality of our community. In her column on July 12 ("Annapolis whiffs on City Dock again"), Susan Reimer called the Save Annapolis Coalition members some "fusty historic types," and although we are determined to maintain the architectural character and charm of our 300-year - old working maritime port, it's the future that we are focused on. The height and bulk of buildings in downtown Annapolis have been limited since 1967 to preserve an 18th century architectural scale, which is sometimes called a "human scale" and is what makes the city special; Annapolis is considered beautiful by its visitors and twice has been named one of America's most beautiful small towns by Forbes Magazine.
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