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Ordell Braase

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Mike Preston | August 4, 2013
There was a message left on the office phone one cold night in 2001, but the caller didn't leave his name. It was just an old raspy voice wanting to say hi. I recognized the voice because I had heard him talk several hundred times, so I called him back to give him my regards. It was Art Donovan. Before I finished my introduction, he cut me off and started another conversation. "I know who you are, kid," said the Baltimore Colts' former Pro Bowl defensive tackle. "I read your stuff.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Art Donovan played pro football for 12 years. The rest of his life, he spent telling everyone about it. Donovan, 89, who died Sunday of a respiratory ailment at Stella Maris Hospice, played and talked a great game. He was a Hall of Fame defensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts and an engaging raconteur at banquets and on TV talk shows. His cherublike face, adenoidal voice and side-splitting tales of yore captivated generations of viewers who never saw Donovan collar a quarterback or take down a runner.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Art Donovan played pro football for 12 years. The rest of his life, he spent telling everyone about it. Donovan, 89, who died Sunday of a respiratory ailment at Stella Maris Hospice, played and talked a great game. He was a Hall of Fame defensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts and an engaging raconteur at banquets and on TV talk shows. His cherublike face, adenoidal voice and side-splitting tales of yore captivated generations of viewers who never saw Donovan collar a quarterback or take down a runner.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 4, 2013
There was a message left on the office phone one cold night in 2001, but the caller didn't leave his name. It was just an old raspy voice wanting to say hi. I recognized the voice because I had heard him talk several hundred times, so I called him back to give him my regards. It was Art Donovan. Before I finished my introduction, he cut me off and started another conversation. "I know who you are, kid," said the Baltimore Colts' former Pro Bowl defensive tackle. "I read your stuff.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
He's 80 now, and slightly bent, as if preparing to set in a three-point stance. Three hip replacements, plus a new knee, will do that to a man. Not that Ordell Braase is complaining. "Physically, I'm in pretty good shape," said Braase, longtime defensive end for the Baltimore Colts. "Mentally? Well . . . it's getting a little cramped up there. " The years haven't fogged his recollections of the 1968 NFL championship, a 34-0 shutout before a crowd of 80,628 in Cleveland. Braase did his part, plowing through the Browns to register three sacks and stop Leroy Kelly, their storied running back, in his tracks.
SPORTS
April 6, 1993
Former Colts who will participate in a soccer contest for charity at halftime of tonight's Spirit-Harrisburg Heat playoff game (years with Colts in parentheses):Sisto Averno (1953-54), Dick Bielski (1962-63), Ordell Braase (1957-68), Art DeCarlo (1957-60), Marty Domres (1972-75), Doug Eggers (1954-57), Sam Havrilak (1969-73), Bruce Laird (1972-81), Toni Linhart (1974-79), Tom Matte (1961-72), Ron Mayo (1974), Fred Miller (1963-72), Jim Mutscheller (1954-61), Jim Parker (1957-67), Bill Troup (1974-78)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | March 1, 1991
William A. Fogle, secretary of the Department of Licensing and Regulation, confirmed yesterday that John H. Mosner Jr. and Ordell Braase have been reappointed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to three-year terms on the Maryland Racing Commission.Schaefer first appointed Mosner to the board in 1987. It is the second reappointment for Braase. He was originally named to the nine-man board by former Gov. Harry Hughes in 1984.Schaefer is expected to name a new chairman of the commission to replace its current head, Dr. Ernest Colvin.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 8, 1998
It has been four decades since the game was played, but the 40th reunion of the Baltimore Colts -- the city's first championship pro football team -- scheduled for Nov. 19 at Martin's West is a sellout.Committee chairman Richard E. McCready said the banquet has a waiting list that will be filled if vacancies occur. Tickets are $150, and all places have been committed.Tickets for a luncheon the next day at the Hyatt Regency Hotel for the corporate community, which includes admission to the banquet, are $5,000 for a table of 10.All proceeds from both gatherings go to the Johns Hopkins University research program for finding a cure for ALS, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, the ailment that led to the death last year of Janice Braase, wife of former Colts defensive end Ordell Braase, whose idea it was to stage the benefit reunion.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | September 8, 2007
Jim Mutscheller will be watching the Ravens Monday night. He also makes it to most home games. Mutscheller, 77, is a veteran of the Greatest Game Ever Played, the Baltimore Colts' 23-17 overtime win over the New York Giants for the 1958 NFL championship. When Baltimore got to the New York eight-yard line in overtime, the first play was a one-yard run by Alan Ameche, the second a six-yard Johnny Unitas pass to Mutscheller -- and the third, Ameche's run across the goal line and into football glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 15, 2001
At "An Evening of Hope Gala," some 300 guests got to see Oriole Park at Camden Yards from the perspective of the players -- from the infield. The first ever on-field gala held at the ballpark offered tuxedoed and gowned civilians a chance to walk the bases as they sipped champagne and mingled with almost all the Orioles players and coaches. Who knew third baseman Cal Ripken could perform so well on first base, as he chatted with other partygoers? Meanwhile, a steel band performed from the pitcher's mound and auction items flashed on the big screen overhead.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
He's 80 now, and slightly bent, as if preparing to set in a three-point stance. Three hip replacements, plus a new knee, will do that to a man. Not that Ordell Braase is complaining. "Physically, I'm in pretty good shape," said Braase, longtime defensive end for the Baltimore Colts. "Mentally? Well . . . it's getting a little cramped up there. " The years haven't fogged his recollections of the 1968 NFL championship, a 34-0 shutout before a crowd of 80,628 in Cleveland. Braase did his part, plowing through the Browns to register three sacks and stop Leroy Kelly, their storied running back, in his tracks.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | May 15, 1991
PREAKNESS PARTIES are a bit like pistachio nuts, once you start 'em, you just can't stop! Friday night's glitzy soiree at the World Trade Center and on board our fave ship, the Clipper City, was a dazzling tribute to Maryland's horse racing industry.The bash was hosted by the Maryland Jockey Club and the Pimlico's handsome Joe De Francis, accompanied by the always gorgeous Becky Raynes.THE INVITATION ONLY bash featured music by the much-acclaimed Charlie Byrd and the Strolling Strings along with a bountiful feast of sumptuous Maryland seafood served harborside that won bravos from the assembled.
SPORTS
August 15, 1999
Old Colt praises SteadmanJohn Steadman, I tip my helmet to you, not just as a great sportswriter, but as a greater man. Your articles have always been very interesting and sincere.Having spent nine years in the NFL, I have met many sportswriters. I rate you on top of the class when it comes to fairness and just plain good reporting.John, as you know, when I was with the Colts in the early 1960s, I played on the same team with almost all the great names: John Unitas, Jim Parker, Raymond Berry, Lenny Moore, Jimmy Orr, Gino Marchetti, Ordell Braase, Art Donovan, Bill Pellington and many others.
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