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NEWS
July 27, 2005
On July 25, 2005, ORDELL CURRAN (nee Welliver) "Long time Organist of the North Point Baptist Church," beloved wife of the late James Curran; devoted mother of Gail Janes, Charles and Robert Smith; dear sister of Athelda Sable; dear grandmother of Colleen and Robert Smith. Visitation Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the CVACH-ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue. Mrs. Curran will lie in state at the North Point Baptist Church, 4201 North Point Blvd, on Friday at 9 till 10 A.M., with funeral services starting at 10 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
He's 80 now, and slightly bent, as if preparing to set in a three-point stance. Three hip replacements, plus a new knee, will do that to a man. Not that Ordell Braase is complaining. "Physically, I'm in pretty good shape," said Braase, longtime defensive end for the Baltimore Colts. "Mentally? Well . . . it's getting a little cramped up there. " The years haven't fogged his recollections of the 1968 NFL championship, a 34-0 shutout before a crowd of 80,628 in Cleveland. Braase did his part, plowing through the Browns to register three sacks and stop Leroy Kelly, their storied running back, in his tracks.
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NEWS
May 4, 2004
On April 29, 2004, KENNETH ORDELL FORD, beloved husband of Helen M. Ford, loving father of Glenda and Naoma Ford. Also survived by five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME INC., 4107 Wilkens Ave., on Wednesday 2 to 5 P.M. Funeral Services will be held Thursday 10 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest.
NEWS
July 27, 2005
On July 25, 2005, ORDELL CURRAN (nee Welliver) "Long time Organist of the North Point Baptist Church," beloved wife of the late James Curran; devoted mother of Gail Janes, Charles and Robert Smith; dear sister of Athelda Sable; dear grandmother of Colleen and Robert Smith. Visitation Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the CVACH-ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue. Mrs. Curran will lie in state at the North Point Baptist Church, 4201 North Point Blvd, on Friday at 9 till 10 A.M., with funeral services starting at 10 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
NEWS
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 16, 1992
RUM PUNCH.Elmore Leonard.Delacorte.297 pages. $21. Almost no one tells the whole truth (never mind nothing but the truth) in Elmore Leonard's latest crime novel. Almost everyone is scamming or plotting serious evil against almost everyone else. That, of course, is one thing that makes "Rum Punch" such delicious summer reading.Mr. Leonard's latest sideways look at society, like many others including his last, "Maximum Bob," takes place in South Florida, land of endless shopping centers, condos and lowlifes.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | March 1, 1991
William A. Fogle, secretary of the Department of Licensing and Regulation, confirmed yesterday that John H. Mosner Jr. and Ordell Braase have been reappointed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to three-year terms on the Maryland Racing Commission.Schaefer first appointed Mosner to the board in 1987. It is the second reappointment for Braase. He was originally named to the nine-man board by former Gov. Harry Hughes in 1984.Schaefer is expected to name a new chairman of the commission to replace its current head, Dr. Ernest Colvin.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1997
It's a pleasure to report that "Jackie Brown" is unevenly paced, lethargic and sometimes even boring. Because even though it is mediocre as a movie, as an example of a filmmaker in transition, it is a triumph.With his eagerly anticipated follow-up to "Pulp Fiction" -- that 1994 masterpiece of scattershot editing, addiction to pop culture and Ritalin-deprived dialogue -- Quentin Tarantino seems to be slowing himself down, choosing to focus on characters as complex bundles of motivations rather than vectors for grand gestures and punchy aphorisms.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 8, 1998
It has been four decades since the game was played, but the 40th reunion of the Baltimore Colts -- the city's first championship pro football team -- scheduled for Nov. 19 at Martin's West is a sellout.Committee chairman Richard E. McCready said the banquet has a waiting list that will be filled if vacancies occur. Tickets are $150, and all places have been committed.Tickets for a luncheon the next day at the Hyatt Regency Hotel for the corporate community, which includes admission to the banquet, are $5,000 for a table of 10.All proceeds from both gatherings go to the Johns Hopkins University research program for finding a cure for ALS, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, the ailment that led to the death last year of Janice Braase, wife of former Colts defensive end Ordell Braase, whose idea it was to stage the benefit reunion.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | December 18, 1990
KENNEDYVILLE -- "San Francisco is tough; it's hard to think they won't do it again," said the big guy at the other end of the goose blind.His credentials were enough to convince me -- and this day he also convinced me of his shooting prowess. He gets a lot of practice. His hunting itinerary is awesome.Since the pro football season started, he has shot waterfowl in Ontario, Wisconsin, Louisiana, Montana and Illinois, pheasants in Iowa, not to mention a trip to Poland for wild boar. Also, he has scored a Grand Slam in sheep: a desert in Mexico, dall in Alaska, big horn and stone in British Columbia.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
Unitas and Berry. Moore and Marchetti. Even now, the names quicken the pulse as they roll off the tongue.Forty years ago, the Baltimore Colts edged the New York Giants, in sudden death for the NFL title in what is unabashedly called The Greatest Game Ever Played.Tonight, 28 members of that championship team plan to huddle for a sentimental reunion at Martin's West.The '58 Colts are back, racing the clock one last time."If we don't do something now, there may not be many guys around for the 50th," said Ordell Braase, who helped organize the anniversary affair.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
IT COULD be a midlife crisis, or the sense of middle-age that sets in when the second kid arrives. Maybe it's because he no longer gets to drive his own car and may never put on a football helmet again. Whatever the reason, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has been cultivating the air of danger that has been circulating around his administration of late. Danger has become the modus operandi. Dangerous words. Dangerous deeds. Government by adrenaline. The thrill-seeking became evident when, Ehrlich, 46, delivered his first major address after the close of the 2004 General Assembly session.
NEWS
May 4, 2004
On April 29, 2004, KENNETH ORDELL FORD, beloved husband of Helen M. Ford, loving father of Glenda and Naoma Ford. Also survived by five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME INC., 4107 Wilkens Ave., on Wednesday 2 to 5 P.M. Funeral Services will be held Thursday 10 A.M. at the funeral home. Interment Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | August 13, 2000
ALL THOSE those overpowering hits that bring spectators out of their seats and cause stadiums to vibrate provide thrills that sell tickets. The NFL's popularity has been enhanced by its tough physical presence. It has always been that way. The public revels in watching the all-out contact, what is considered part of the show. Touch football won't sell. But pro football, offering attention-getting box office appeal because of the all-out physical aspect, is a dangerous business. Disturbing facts supporting such a contention can no longer be ignored.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
Unitas and Berry. Moore and Marchetti. Even now, the names quicken the pulse as they roll off the tongue.Forty years ago, the Baltimore Colts edged the New York Giants, in sudden death for the NFL title in what is unabashedly called The Greatest Game Ever Played.Tonight, 28 members of that championship team plan to huddle for a sentimental reunion at Martin's West.The '58 Colts are back, racing the clock one last time."If we don't do something now, there may not be many guys around for the 50th," said Ordell Braase, who helped organize the anniversary affair.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 8, 1998
It has been four decades since the game was played, but the 40th reunion of the Baltimore Colts -- the city's first championship pro football team -- scheduled for Nov. 19 at Martin's West is a sellout.Committee chairman Richard E. McCready said the banquet has a waiting list that will be filled if vacancies occur. Tickets are $150, and all places have been committed.Tickets for a luncheon the next day at the Hyatt Regency Hotel for the corporate community, which includes admission to the banquet, are $5,000 for a table of 10.All proceeds from both gatherings go to the Johns Hopkins University research program for finding a cure for ALS, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, the ailment that led to the death last year of Janice Braase, wife of former Colts defensive end Ordell Braase, whose idea it was to stage the benefit reunion.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1997
It's a pleasure to report that "Jackie Brown" is unevenly paced, lethargic and sometimes even boring. Because even though it is mediocre as a movie, as an example of a filmmaker in transition, it is a triumph.With his eagerly anticipated follow-up to "Pulp Fiction" -- that 1994 masterpiece of scattershot editing, addiction to pop culture and Ritalin-deprived dialogue -- Quentin Tarantino seems to be slowing himself down, choosing to focus on characters as complex bundles of motivations rather than vectors for grand gestures and punchy aphorisms.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 21, 1996
DENVER -- Your offense has produced 93 points the last three weeks. Your quarterback is in one of the hottest stretches of his career. But your defense is so depleted by injuries, you've still lost three straight games.So, what will the Ravens do?Would you believe nothing?"There isn't anything on the street better than what we have here," owner Art Modell said after yesterday's 45-34 loss to Denver. "Anybody who is out there not working, there's a reason they're out there."There's no help in the world, except to get our people back.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
IT COULD be a midlife crisis, or the sense of middle-age that sets in when the second kid arrives. Maybe it's because he no longer gets to drive his own car and may never put on a football helmet again. Whatever the reason, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has been cultivating the air of danger that has been circulating around his administration of late. Danger has become the modus operandi. Dangerous words. Dangerous deeds. Government by adrenaline. The thrill-seeking became evident when, Ehrlich, 46, delivered his first major address after the close of the 2004 General Assembly session.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | October 21, 1996
DENVER -- Your offense has produced 93 points the last three weeks. Your quarterback is in one of the hottest stretches of his career. But your defense is so depleted by injuries, you've still lost three straight games.So, what will the Ravens do?Would you believe nothing?"There isn't anything on the street better than what we have here," owner Art Modell said after yesterday's 45-34 loss to Denver. "Anybody who is out there not working, there's a reason they're out there."There's no help in the world, except to get our people back.
NEWS
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 16, 1992
RUM PUNCH.Elmore Leonard.Delacorte.297 pages. $21. Almost no one tells the whole truth (never mind nothing but the truth) in Elmore Leonard's latest crime novel. Almost everyone is scamming or plotting serious evil against almost everyone else. That, of course, is one thing that makes "Rum Punch" such delicious summer reading.Mr. Leonard's latest sideways look at society, like many others including his last, "Maximum Bob," takes place in South Florida, land of endless shopping centers, condos and lowlifes.
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