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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Well, something had to come along after all those cute videos of classical flash mobs. Maybe this project of Carnegie Hall and Ensemble ACJW will inspire the next craze -- an orchestra setting up on the street in front of a music stand with the words "Conduct Us" on it.  Midweek Madness could not resist this clip of what happened when passersby in Manhattan took the bait.  
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The last weekend of September could not have been much more caloric, musically speaking, without actually clogging arteries. While the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reveling in the high romanticism of Rachmaninoff and Korngold ( my review was posted earlier ), the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gorged on hefty emotional outpouring by Brahms and Tchaikovsky. I rather enjoyed both lyrical feasts. On Saturday night, Hajime Teri Murai, director of orchestral activities at Peabody for more than two decades, got the conservatory's 2014-2015 concert series rocking with a crisp, jazzy little curtain raiser, Shafer Mahoney's "Sparkle.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 6, 1996
Perhaps the second most wonderful thing about being young is being slow to recognize danger or difficultly. That's surely one reason why the battle of the skies in World War II was won putting American teen-agers in fighter planes. It must also have been a factor in the convincing performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 6 that the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gave Saturday evening in Friedberg Concert Hall.Under the baton of their music director, Hajime Teri Murai, the young musicians performed this fiercely difficult work, the most tragic in the Mahler canon, with energy, stamina and accuracy that would have made a professional orchestra proud.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
You might suspect some strange jinx, or wonder if the third time's the harm. But the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is taking a rash of high-profile artist cancellations in stride. On July 29 came the news that actor/singer and star of Showtime's "Homeland" Mandy Patinkin had withdrawn from his BSO SuperPops program scheduled for January "due to a schedule conflict. " He would be replaced by "Seinfeld" veteran Jason Alexander. On Sept. 15, three days before the opening night of the season, the orchestra announced that Baltimore's own Hilary Hahn would not be on hand to play Beethoven's Violin Concerto as planned because the popular artist needed "to recover fully from a muscle strain.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 13, 1996
The Concert Artists of Baltimore under conductor Edward Polochick have achieved a winning formula in combining choral and orchestral repertoire. Saturday's program, at LeClerc Hall at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, was a little different in that the chorus and orchestra offered separate sets of music.In this solid, professional series of concerts, one work usually crowns the evening. Saturday, the piece was a heavenly realization of Benjamin Britten's "Hymn to Saint Cecilia." Mr. Polochick and his singers presented this short choral symphony with taste and elan.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 2, 1997
Daniele Gatti is traveling fast.The 35-year-old conductor and his orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic, land at the Kennedy Center this afternoon for the final concert in one of the most whirlwind tours in symphonic history. In 22 days, they will have given 19 concerts, featuring six major works on three different programs, as they crisscrossed ,, the United States -- from New York to California and back again."Yessss -- verrry big tour," says the Milan-born musician, in whose fluent (if somewhat fractured)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | January 27, 1995
Let it be known that the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra is in very capable hands.Scott Speck, in his debut concert at the helm, had his 56 musicians in excellent form Sunday evening in a program of Tchaikovsky, Bizet, Brahms and John Adams at Key Auditorium in Annapolis.Mr. Speck, 33, establishes a much different podium persona from that of his predecessor, Arne Running, the emotional Philadelphian who served the CYSO so well in his two seasons here. Where Mr. Running stomped the feet and stabbed the air to inspire his troops, Mr. Speck's kinder, gentler stick work coaxes the players in a less insistent manner.
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By Knight-Ridder | May 22, 1991
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -- The Philadelphia Orchestra's concert here last night produced an explosive emotional outburst at the end that caught the musicians by surprise. Playing its first concert ever in Prague, the ensemble had programmed Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, "Eroica," and followed with a Russian work.The concert, part of the orchestra's current European tour, had been programmed when Czechoslovakia was still a Communist country. No one could have predicted what Beethoven's music would mean in a nation that has since turned its government upside down, whose people have chosen freedom and now grope toward some solid footing as a republic.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 23, 1993
David Zinman has signed a new four-year contract to continue as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The contract begins at the end of next season and keeps Zinman with the orchestra through 1997-1998. It makes his tenure, which began in 1985, one of the longest in recent American symphonic history."We have worked so hard and accomplished so much over the past eight years," said Zinman yesterday from San Francisco, where he was guest-conducting. "I am excited that we can now build further on that strong foundation."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1998
The Vice Admiral Elliot Bryant and Miriam Bryant Distinguished Artist Series has brought performers of international stature to the Naval Academy in Annapolis for seven years, and this year's series is no exception.Russia's St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra, which has attracted high-quality talent since its inception, opens the series Nov. 12 on the Alumni Hall stage.hTC Conductors such as Leonard Bernstein, Kiril Kondrashin, Gennady Rozhdestvensky and Simon Rattle have taken the podium with the orchestra since its founding in 1967, and soloists of the magnitude of pianist Murray Perahia and cellist Mstislav Rostropovich have dotted the ranks of its collaborating artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University opens its school year this week with about 600 students, 150 faculty members and a new dean. Fred Bronstein, who started on the job in June after six years as president of the St. Louis Symphony, is the 16th person to take the helm since the music conservatory was founded in 1857. His title is different, though. The designation was changed to "dean" from "director," established before the conservatory became affiliated with JHU in 1977, to make Peabody consistent with the university's other academic divisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A one-of-a-kind oboe belonging to a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reportedly stolen outside a Montreal hotel Tuesday morning. With the BSO season starting in less than a month, she's anxious to get it back. “We all are very wedded to these instruments,” said Katherine Needleman, principal oboist for the BSO. “It's very special to me. It's the only one like it.” Needleman said the oboe was a prototype, made by Yamaha while she was working with the company in developing a new model.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The worlds of pop and classical music do not meet all that often — or all that well, as a rule — but certain artists have proved quite adept at bridging the gap. Ben Folds is one of them. The Winston-Salem, N.C.-born, Nashville-based songwriter and pianist has been on an international tour billed as the Ben Folds Orchestra Experience. The tour brings him to Charm City on Thursday for a concert with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which first joined Folds in a gig nine years ago. That 2005 program featured Folds songs enhanced with orchestral arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Marin Alsop, who led a vigorous account of Beethoven's Ninth last month with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra , will conduct that same iconic work on Sunday with her ensemble in Brazil, the Orquestra Sinfonica do Estado de Sao Paulo, as a World Cup salute. This performance will be streamed live for free on the terrific classical Web site, medici.tv , at 4:30 p.m. EST on July 6. Joining the Sao Paulo orchestra and two choirs (Coro Academico da OSESP and Coro da OSESP)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Angelo Gatto spoke softly and carried a small baton, but the slender 92-year-old conductor had no trouble getting respect from the musicians of the Maryland Youth Symphony Orchestra rehearsing for Saturday's milestone concert. The milestone is Gatto's final concert as music director of the orchestra, which he founded 50 years ago. During that time, he mentored an estimated 3,000 students from the area, inspiring many to pursue musical careers. Alumni can be found in such major orchestras as the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and on podiums leading ensembles of their own. To the players rehearsing at the Center for the Arts on the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County, Gatto offered his trademark instruction: "Don't just play notes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
The Anne Arundel Community College Symphony Orchestra continues to surpass audience expectations under music director and conductor Anna Binneweg, now in her eighth season at the college. Having performed six concerts in its first European tour in March, the orchestra - made up of students and county residents of all ages - continues to explore new challenges and polish new facets of this gem. The "Made in America" concert last weekend displayed the orchestra's expertise: in the first half, delivering 20th-century American masterworks along with premiering an intriguing 21st-century work composed by adjunct professor Gregory Pascuzzi - with a huge surprise in the second half.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
William Leonard Hobbs, a society band leader known as the "Meyer Davis of Baltimore," died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 89.Mr. Hobbs, a resident of Towson for 30 years, began his career in the Roaring '20s playing piano with the Capitolians and the Maryland Collegians. He later conducted the pit orchestra at the Hippodrome Theater and led his own orchestra at Baltimore's Chanticleer nightclub in the 1940s.He went on to work as manager of Morgan Baer Orchestras and Lenny Hobbs Music, booking bands for society functions, weddings and private parties.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | October 27, 1994
The BBC National Orchestra of Wales and its music director, Tadaaki Otaka, played at the Meyerhoff Tuesday night in the first of two concerts by visiting orchestras while the Baltimore Symphony is on its East Asia tour. Although this orchestra is no match for the BSO, it is a fine ensemble and it was a shame the hall was barely half-filled.The opening number was Tchaikovsky's "Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture," which was given a routine reading. There was was none of the passion or longing that can be brought to the music when one plays more than just notes.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Last weekend found two of the area's orchestral ensembles in fine form. Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an imaginative mix of standard and far-from-standard fare Saturday night at the Gordon Center. The familiar work was Mendelssohn's "Scottish Symphony," which received an absorbing performance conducted by Edward Polochick. He paid great attention to subtle details, especially the woodwind voices, and he ensured that the most atmospheric elements in the score came through vividly (slicing string attacks in the finale evoked a brisk highland breeze)
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
The Columbia Orchestra gets to do a lot of big pieces during the season, but it also has a free chamber music concert series that puts the focus on smaller pieces. Its next chamber concert is on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Orchestral performers really appreciate such opportunities to explore the chamber music repertory. The upcoming concert features the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio, composed of music director Jason Love on cello, concertmaster Brenda Anna on violin and Nancy Smith on piano.
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