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By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
In a Carroll County field, the plot to restore the long-deposed King of the Forest to its arboreal throne is afoot. Royalty in this case is the American chestnut, and the host for this attempted restoration is the State Highway Administration, which has set aside a 2-acre plot by the newly opened Route 30 Hampstead bypass to plant an orchard of the same spreading tree that sheltered Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's village smithy. Assisting in the effort is a retired physicist-turned-woodcarver named Gary Carver, an Ijamsville man who doubles as president of the Maryland chapter of the American Chestnut Federation - a group dedicated to reviving a once-proud species that was devastated by a fungal blight during the first half of the 20th century.
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May 1, 2014
The Temple for World Peace, Baltimore's first Buddhist temple, will open Friday after more than a year of construction. The nearly two-acre property, east of Belvedere Square on Northern Parkway, includes an orchard, playground, cafe and bookstore, as well as the central worship and meditation space. The temple will celebrate the opening with a blessing ceremony Friday evening, an open house and talk on mindfulness Saturday and a workshop on compassion in the modern world on Sunday.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Lohr's Orchard is not out of business, and its owner wants t set the record straight."We've simply relocated," Andrew Lohr Jr. said as he inspected cider mill machinery in a renovated dairy barn on his 100-acre TTC orchard in Churchville. "When my brother George and I dissolved our partnership last spring, obviously many people thought we were closing the orchard for good. Our sales fell off approximately 35 percent."George decided to leave the operation, but this is what I like to do best.
NEWS
Staff Reports | April 23, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Department of Public Works says a portion of Piney Orchard Parkway in Odenton was closed on Wednesday morning in both directions from Waugh Chapel Road to Strawberry Lake Way as crews restore the roadway damaged by a water main break this morning. The break was reported at 5 a.m. and repaired by Bureau of Utilities crews, but badly damaged approximately 150 feet of Piney Orchard Parkway.   Officials said efforts to restore the damaged section of Piney Orchard Parkway to safe driving standards were under way Wednesday morning and were expected to be completed by the end of the day.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | August 10, 2003
Orchard, by Larry Watson. Random House. 256 pages. $24.95. If there exists a literary equivalent to the artist's play of light on a canvas, then Larry Watson has mastered it. Author of the best-selling Montana, 1948, Watson deftly uses light to inform his subjects in this story of grief, betrayal and jealousy. Set against the backdrop of the rugged, rural towns of Door County, Wis., in the 1950s, every scene of Orchard is painted with deliberate, vivid strokes of radiance: the soft glow of the moon, the intense whites of a horse's eyes, sun so hot it burns the blue out of a cloudless sky. The story centers on Ned Weaver, an artist made famous for his paintings of resplendent landscapes.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
State and local officials hailed the Orchard Crossing apartment development in Ellicott City yesterday as a model for providing affordable housing in a high-income setting."
NEWS
By MAUREEN RICE | November 9, 1993
Looking for some great apples to make that American pie for those who don't like pumpkin at Thanksgiving?Carolyn Orchards on Route 32 in Gamber has a dozen varieties, including old-time favorites smokehouse and Grimes golden.Operating since 1955, Carolyn Orchards is named after co-owner Eva Carolyn Brothers."A lot of people think that it's my name, and that's what they call me." Ms. Brothers said. My children used to think it was very funny that people called me Carolyn, but they liked it even better when we went to the supermarket and they heard kids saying to their parents, 'Look!
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 14, 1991
Here are a few recent letters to the household environmentalist:Dear H.E.: I recently received a present from my in-laws -- a basket of fancy fruit and jam from a mail-order orchard in Oregon. Imagine my growing dismay as I opened the box, lifted out the foam rubber padding, peeled away the plastic film wrapper, unwrapped the waxed tissue from around each individual fruit and candy, and even found a gigantic Styrofoam insert under the goodies. The packaging dwarfed the edibles. Here's my question: Shouldn't I let my in-laws know that the present they sent contained an unconscionable amount of trash?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | February 17, 1995
If you haven't been to the Orchard Market and Cafe in Towson lately, you'll find that it's prettier than ever, with a new look to the small dining room. The menu of Baltimore's only Persian restaurant has been redone, too, with such dishes as duck breast in pomegranate sauce with wild currants, and more seafood, including a Persian bouillabaisse and paella made with basmati rice.* Every other month, Rudys' 2900 in Finksburg holds a themed dinner for $39.50 per person -- the one coming up is called "Viva Italia."
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | October 13, 1991
George Lohr walks the rows of apple trees, checking the fruit that will make the last harvest at his family's Joppatowne orchard. Come next fall, you will not find him conducting this ritual here.After 60 years of growing apples, peaches, plums, pears and pumpkins, Lohr's Orchard -- considered by some longtime residents to be a veritable county institution -- will close at year's end.Instead of trees blossoming in the spring, work will begin on roads and sewer and water lines to serve a new community of 378 houses and town houses to be built on the 85-acre orchard farm.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
The Orchard Beach Volunteer Fire Company recently accepted a grant of $6,400 from Exelon Energy Company to help purchase a new thermal imaging camera for the station. The cameras use infrared technology to see through smoke and darkness to assist firefighters in finding victims, pinpoint fires and recognize structural dangers. Pictured, from left, are Exelon Industrial Services Vice President Glen Robinson, Orchard Beach Chief James Evans, Company President Walt Snyder, Anne Arundel County Fire Chief Michael Cox, Lt. Frank Smith, volunteer firefighters Wayne Snyder and Susan Kirby and Senior Safety Consultant Dennis Conlan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Here's what we like to see at Midnight Sun: A trusted local brewery collaborating with nearby farms to create something new. Frederick's Flying Dog announced last week that it has teamed up with Jefferson's Distillery Lane Ciderworks and Purcellville, Va.'s Breaux Vineyards for two small-batch beers. The Orchard Ale was made with fresh-pressed apple juice from Distillery Lane, and the Vineyard Blonde - a Belgian-inspired ale - was made with Vidal Blanc grape juice from Breaux Vineyards, according to Flying Dog's director of communications, Erin Weston.
SPORTS
By Roman Stubbs, The Washington Post | December 1, 2012
Isaiah Black threw a go-ahead 24-yard touchdown pass to Micah Till with 2 minutes, 14 seconds left, and Wise's defense held off a furious late drive by Quince Orchard to capture its first Class 4A football state championship with a 12-7 victory Friday night at M&T Bank Stadium. Black did not attempt a pass in the first half as the Pumas (13-0) from Upper Marlboro stuck to their run-heavy offensive script, but the junior took over at just the right time in a game controlled by two dominant defenses.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel, For The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
The power, size and speed of the Henry A. Wise football team ended Meade's dream season with a nightmare. After two surprising road playoff victories over then-No. 4 Arundel and then-No. 6 Old Mill, No. 5 Meade hoped to keep rolling in the Class 4A state semifinal Saturday afternoon. But Wise used its bulk to take control early and steamroll the visiting Mustangs, 40-0. Wise (13-0) advances to the Class 4A state final Friday at M&T Bank Stadium against Quince Orchard, who edged No. 3 Westminster, 21-19, in the other state semifinal Friday night.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 24, 2012
In a season where everything had gone right, the Westminster football team had put itself in position to win its biggest game in years. If the Owls could make a field goal on the game's last play, they would defeat perennial power Quince Orchard and advance to their first state title game since 2005.  But after 48 minutes of football, a missed field goal signaled the end of Westminster's dream season.  Justin Cohen's 37-yard field goal...
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
No. 3 Westminster finally ran into a team that could stifle its prolific passing offense. The Owls' struggled against a Quince Orchard defense that was more athletic, better able to cover their stellar corps of receivers than the previous teams they had met in the playoffs and put a lot of pressure on senior quarterback Deryk Kern, who was sacked four times. The Cougars used that defense and good special teams play to power their 21-19 win in Friday night's Class 4A state semifinal football game before a standing-room only crowd at Westminster.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2002
NEW KENT, Va. - Five weeks ago in the Belmont, aboard a 70-1 unknown named Sarava, Edgar Prado dashed California jockey Victor Espinoza's hopes of winning the Triple Crown with War Emblem. Yesterday, Prado bested Espinoza again, this time in the $500,000 Virginia Derby at Colonial Downs. Riding the Bill Mott-trained Orchard Park, Prado crossed the wire 1 1/2 lengths ahead of Espinoza and his mount, the Neil Drysdale-trained Flying Dash. Espinoza's horse in both races was the favorite.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
Three weeks ago, the auctioneer's gavel was about to slam on Nancy and Lou Hoffman's farm, threatening to end operations at the largest -- and one of the oldest -- orchards in Baltimore County.But thanks to neighbors and a local land trust, the Hoffmans are harvesting another apple crop at the farm in Glen Arm.In an example of the increasing sophistication of land preservationists nationwide, Long Green Valley Conservancy raised $100,000 and pushed to get a $290,000 interest-free state loan to buy the 101-acre Maple Hill Farm three days before the foreclosure sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Would you rather be loved or respected? The Mo's group of seafood restaurants and markets gets a lot of the former and not much of the latter. When Anthony Bourdain chose Mo's to represent Baltimore dining on a 2009 "No Reservations" episode, Baltimore foodies were annoyed. Why Mo's, of all places? Mo's might not be where you'd send someone to form a lasting impression of Maryland seafood. But two locations near the Inner Harbor have outlived a number of highfalutin seafood restaurants that weren't as smart about catering to tourist tastes.
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A new nonprofit organization aims to turn the fruits of its labors into fresh food for the hungry. The Baltimore Orchard Project will glean gather otherwise unwanted fruit from trees on public and private land and donate the harvest to food banks, congregations and soup kitchens, says founder and director Nina Beth Cardin, a rabbi and community activist. The group's founding team has 25 members from such agencies as the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future, Tree Baltimore and Baltimore Green Space.
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