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By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
WHEN THE FINAL rounds of the 2002 Joseph S. Rumbaugh Historical Oration Contest were over on the Fourth of July, Severna Park resident Greg Price was named top teen-age orator in the nation and winner of the $3,000 grand prize. The 18-year old Severn School graduate can teach us all a thing or two about how to celebrate Independence Day. Not only did he out-talk five other talented finalists in the annual contest sponsored by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, but he came away from the patriotic competition with an increased appreciation of our nation's founding fathers, sons and brothers.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | September 4, 2012
Barack Obama has given some great speeches since his national debut as the keynote speaker at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. Don't expect his speech Thursday night in Charlotte to be one of them. This is not a moment to announce his arrival on the national political scene. Nor will this speech be anything like the Philadelphia speech of May 2008, where he explained how racial identity shaped his life and the fate of the nation. Because asking to be returned to the Oval Office for a second term is a task quite different from asking for the first four years, Thursday's speech may not even look much like Mr. Obama's acceptance speech four years ago at Denver's Invesco Field.
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
On a rainy afternoon, 20 teens unleashed a river of eloquence in the 11th annual Black History Oratory Contest held yesterday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Some made it look effortless, reciting their three-minute speeches with poise. Three speakers -- a football player with dreams of politics, a boy who plans to be a minister, and a girl who loves to write -- were the official winners in the field of 20 students. Others made it plain that they had obstacles to overcome, such as a 15-year-old girl who had such a struggle to remember her text that she stopped and asked, "Can I try again later?"
NEWS
By Jean Marbella | jean.marbella@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
M aybe it was denial, maybe it was just a need to never let 'em see you sweat - whoever 'ey are. But even as some of her lawyers, staff and supporters were visibly upset by her conviction Tuesday, Mayor Sheila Dixon kept her game face on, a bit moist-eyed at one point but projecting a mostly stoney expression at least while in public. Did the trial happen to someone else? Obviously not, but as her trial has consumed much of the oxygen in town for the past three or so weeks, Dixon is surely among the few Baltimoreans who have yet to make their feelings known on the subject.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
Three qualities will almost certainly characterize today's deliberations in the House of Representatives on whether or not to take another step toward the impeachment of President Clinton: The debate will be nasty, brutish and short.Brilliance will elude the House chamber, which has, on rare occasions, served as the scenery for the making of foolish history. The debate will not dazzle. No stunning speeches will be heard, no flights of golden oratory launched into the national posterity.Such are the expectations of some, if not all, people professionally interested in today's outcome.
NEWS
July 17, 2000
John O. Pastore, 93, a former Rhode Island governor and U.S. senator with a gift for oratory, died Saturday of kidney failure at a nursing home in North Kingstown, R.I., where he was being treated for Parkinson's disease. His political career included four years as the state's governor and 26 years in the Senate.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER | January 29, 1994
Jerry Seinfeld notes in his delightful best-seller, "SeinLanguage," that the No. 1 fear of Americans (according to surveys) is public speaking.No. 2 is death. ''Does that seem right?'' he asks. ''That means to the average person, if you have to go to a funeral, you're better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.''I was thinking along similar lines last spring when I was asked by the Loch Raven Optimist Club to judge an oratory contest. The competition took place in a Parkville church social hall, and I watched as eight well-dressed young teen-agers came before us in turn, paused for a dramatic second (during which I silently prayed they would not run from the hall in panic)
NEWS
January 17, 1996
STEVE FORBES is now the recipient of the finest form of flattery a long-shot political candidate can have: Attack, attack and attack. Front-runner Bob Dole is on the attack, finally responding to a fusillade of hostile TV ads from the magazine publisher. Lamar Alexander, Pat Buchanan and Phil Gramm are on the attack, sensing that the Forbes surge reduces their chances of grabbing the coveted No. 2 finish in Iowa and New Hampshire. Even Fortune magazine is on the attack, accusing Forbes magazine and its namesake publisher of violating "journalism ethics" in allowing big advertisers to influence stories.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Standing at the dais before a packed State House crowd of delegates, senators, members of Congress, Cabinet members, family and friends, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. lopped off a third of the speech that took three months to write. He interrupted himself to point out old friends and introduce new Cabinet members. He cracked a few jokes, turned serious, then forceful, then conciliatory and drew applause on more than a dozen occasions. And 31 minutes after it began yesterday, the governor's State of the State address was over.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 8, 1993
It's Jack Kent Cooke's desire to minimize talking about the palace for football he intends to create midway between Baltimore and Washington. Obviously, he believes the idea sells itself and doesn't require any explanation.This is an unusual posture for a billionaire sportsman who rarely rations his words and, upon expressing himself, does it with a distinctive flow of oratory -- backed up by intent that only a fool would challenge.In an interview, almost all of which the Washington Redskins owner wanted off the record, there were few things he allowed open for discussion.
NEWS
By Patrick T. Reardon and Patrick T. Reardon,Chicago Tribune | January 18, 2009
In his first appearance on a national stage, Barack Obama rocked the house. Giving the keynote address at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston, the little-known Illinois state legislator running for the U.S. Senate electrified the packed hall with a speech about dreams, faith and a politics of hope. Obama evoked waves of standing ovations with such lines as, "There's not a liberal America and a conservative America; there's a United States of America. There's not a black America and white America and Latino America and Asian America; there's a United States of America."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | October 5, 2007
Jerry Hicks, 64, lives in Glen Burnie, but he prays several times a week at Our Lady's Center, off Rogers Avenue in Ellicott City. "I'm a roaming Catholic," he jokes, noting that he also attends churches in Washington and on the Eastern Shore. For almost six years, roaming to Ellicott City meant that Hicks had to pray in a double-wide rented trailer, because the original building had been destroyed by fire Dec. 22, 2001. After years of effort, mostly by retired engineer Philip Adinolfi, 84, the structure has been rebuilt and is roughly double its original size.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | May 31, 2007
Memorial Day is a lovely day in America, a day of reunion in small towns, where people drive up to the cemetery on Monday morning and file in, old-timers carrying lawn chairs, and even if you've missed a few years, people will come over and shake your hand and thank you for coming. You don't have to dress up or support the war in Iraq. You just come, and afterward there's hot dogs and potato salad at the Legion Club. It's the last patriotic holiday that still means something, and it persists year after year despite the wooden rituals and leaden speeches.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN REPORTER | January 16, 2007
Celebrators of Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemorated the national holiday yesterday with thunderous oratory, booming bass drums and good deeds across Baltimore - along with quiet introspection befitting the legacy of the civil rights leader. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings emphasized in an emotional speech at a memorial breakfast at Martin's West in Woodlawn that people must find the courage to speak out against injustice, just as King did a half-century ago in battling racial segregation. The six-term Democrat from Baltimore said no one has "the right to remain silent," and briefly criticized President Bush's decision for a troop surge in Iraq.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | March 13, 2006
On a day when the rest of the city seemed to be relaxing - enjoying warm weather and the St. Patrick's Day parade - 17 teenagers gathered yesterday at a downtown museum to compete at something many adults find terrifying: speaking in public. "I was so nervous when I got up there, my face was jumping all over the place and I didn't even remember what I said when I sat back down," said Khase Johnson, a senior at Carver Vocational Technical High School. Johnson conquered his demons: The 17-year-old Baltimore resident took third place.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 6, 2006
First came Wal-Mart, a clash over corporate health benefits that drew the nation's gaze to Annapolis. Legislators then, with their bags scarcely unpacked, took up undoing one Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. veto after another. Democrats, it seemed, scarcely let up on the green vote button, overriding and overriding until they had reversed more executive vetoes than any General Assembly in memory. And the party was just getting started. Senators filibustered on the floor and threatened more.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 15, 1992
It probably won't matter a hill of beans, but I keep hearing people who plan to vote for Bill Clinton complain that there's something about him they don't like. It has to do with style, not substance, which figures. We're pretty much gonzo about style in this country.Though they'll probably vote for him anyway, some people say they don't like the way Clinton speaks, the way he moves his hands.Almost everything he says sounds like a speech bordering on a sermon -- as if it were written, edited, memorized and rehearsed in front of a mirror.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2000
The judges admitted they weren't sure what to expect from Ashley Wilkerson, a 17-year-old with eyes of coal and braids that sprout every which way. But as soon as she spoke yesterday, they sat transfixed. Five minutes later, her giant hoop earrings swaying, the Dallas girl with a raspy twang hit her peak on the stage inside the Baltimore Convention Center meeting room. "I know that I'm beautiful," she proclaimed, her rising voice echoing faintly off the walls. "I know I am worthy of the very best.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Standing at the dais before a packed State House crowd of delegates, senators, members of Congress, Cabinet members, family and friends, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. lopped off a third of the speech that took three months to write. He interrupted himself to point out old friends and introduce new Cabinet members. He cracked a few jokes, turned serious, then forceful, then conciliatory and drew applause on more than a dozen occasions. And 31 minutes after it began yesterday, the governor's State of the State address was over.
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