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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy Newspapers | August 18, 2007
Got plenty of ice? Summer is all about cool drinks. Sangria just screams summer. We suggest using a Spanish white wine as a base. We tested this recipe using Vega Sindoa, a Spanish chardonnay. For added color, use red and green apple bits. Super White Sangria Makes 8 servings 1 (750-milliliter) bottle dry white wine, such as chardonnay 1 (6-ounce) can frozen lemonade concentrate 1/2 cup light rum 1/2 cup orange-flavored liqueur, such as a triple sec 1 (15.25-ounce) can pineapple tidbits packed in natural juices 1 large apple (about 1 1/4 cups diced)
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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy Newspapers | August 18, 2007
Got plenty of ice? Summer is all about cool drinks. Sangria just screams summer. We suggest using a Spanish white wine as a base. We tested this recipe using Vega Sindoa, a Spanish chardonnay. For added color, use red and green apple bits. Super White Sangria Makes 8 servings 1 (750-milliliter) bottle dry white wine, such as chardonnay 1 (6-ounce) can frozen lemonade concentrate 1/2 cup light rum 1/2 cup orange-flavored liqueur, such as a triple sec 1 (15.25-ounce) can pineapple tidbits packed in natural juices 1 large apple (about 1 1/4 cups diced)
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 2, 2006
A few weeks ago, my husband came home with a prized dinner invitation. One of his colleagues, a physics professor from India, had asked us over for a home-cooked Indian meal. Because I adore Indian food but rarely cook it, I was beside myself with excitement. When we RSVP'd, I asked if there was anything I might do to help. The host hesitated, then proposed I bring dessert, explaining that although he enjoyed cooking his country's celebrated entrees, he was not "a dessert person." A sweets aficionado, I enthusiastically volunteered to bring a confection to end our meal.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 2, 2006
A few weeks ago, my husband came home with a prized dinner invitation. One of his colleagues, a physics professor from India, had asked us over for a home-cooked Indian meal. Because I adore Indian food but rarely cook it, I was beside myself with excitement. When we RSVP'd, I asked if there was anything I might do to help. The host hesitated, then proposed I bring dessert, explaining that although he enjoyed cooking his country's celebrated entrees, he was not "a dessert person." A sweets aficionado, I enthusiastically volunteered to bring a confection to end our meal.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
Although it's easy to complain about the lack of inspiring produce in supermarkets this time of the year, shoppers sometimes overlook the obvious. There's a wealth of citrus available -- tangerines, oranges, lemons and even Key limes. Don't restrict citrus to breakfast. By taking advantage of these fruits in lunch and dinner menus, you'll revive winter-weary recipes with orange, yellow, green and pink hues and zesty flavors. Substitute lime juice for vinegar in salad dressings. Lime juice has a tangy, fresh taste that perks up seafood, chicken and vegetables.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 10, 1992
I am at Nick's in the Cross Street Market asking the guy to explain the big fish.By now he knows that I never buy the big fish -- large fish fascinate, but terrify me -- but he explains them anyway.Today the guy is wearing a brown mohair sweater that looks like it was old when Ronald Reagan was a boy. But if you had to stand behind counters full of iced fish all day, you'd probably want a sweater, too. And you might not want to wear your best one."That's a mahi-mahi," he says, pointing at the big fish, artistically bent on the ice bed around a school of smaller fish.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 28, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / FAMILY The family will want seconds of Orange Basil Roast Chicken today. Serve the tender bird with rice and fresh kale. Add dinner rolls.
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By Rob Kasper | September 18, 1996
THE MEALTIME rhythms have changed recently at our house. Breakfast has become a brisk affair, bowls of cereal are consumed, then bodies go flying out the kitchen door. Lunch has become a challenge. Guessing what kind of sandwich should go in the bag lunch is like figuring out the current top tune. The favorite seems to change daily. Supper time has become a sometime thing -- sometimes it is early, sometimes it is late.The kids are back in school, and like many other households in this situation, we have had to make adjustments at mealtime.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | August 5, 1998
Responses to requests for Frog Eye Salad and stewed tomatoes have been received and tested. You are in for a treat.Frog Eye Salad was the request of Debbie Trimp of Sioux Falls, S.D. She wanted a version of this quick and simple noodle dish that didn't use eggs. Her response came from Trina Herll of Brandon, S.D.Ann Bailey of Pasadena wanted stewed tomatoes, and Mary W. Earl of Baltimore responded with a recipe that she says "came from Ms. Brown's cookbook at the Hilltop House in Harpers Ferry, W. Va. I have made these for the last 40 to 50 years.
FEATURES
October 16, 1991
* Margaret Dutry of Sunbury, Pa., wants a recipe for a green tomato pie.* Bertha Ryder of Baltimore is searching for a baked potato soup recipe.* Katherine Goloway of Baltimore wants recipes for square blueberry and strawberry cakes, similar to those sold at bakeries.* Lois Raney of New Market, Ala., wants a recipe for rice cream. She says the recipe came off the back of Kraft marshmallow package back in 1974 or 1975. The recipe ingredients included either pineapple or orange slices.* Ellen Moffre of Lutehrville is looking for a candied apple recipe.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
Although it's easy to complain about the lack of inspiring produce in supermarkets this time of the year, shoppers sometimes overlook the obvious. There's a wealth of citrus available -- tangerines, oranges, lemons and even Key limes. Don't restrict citrus to breakfast. By taking advantage of these fruits in lunch and dinner menus, you'll revive winter-weary recipes with orange, yellow, green and pink hues and zesty flavors. Substitute lime juice for vinegar in salad dressings. Lime juice has a tangy, fresh taste that perks up seafood, chicken and vegetables.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 28, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / FAMILY The family will want seconds of Orange Basil Roast Chicken today. Serve the tender bird with rice and fresh kale. Add dinner rolls.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 18, 1996
THE MEALTIME rhythms have changed recently at our house. Breakfast has become a brisk affair, bowls of cereal are consumed, then bodies go flying out the kitchen door. Lunch has become a challenge. Guessing what kind of sandwich should go in the bag lunch is like figuring out the current top tune. The favorite seems to change daily. Supper time has become a sometime thing -- sometimes it is early, sometimes it is late.The kids are back in school, and like many other households in this situation, we have had to make adjustments at mealtime.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 10, 1992
I am at Nick's in the Cross Street Market asking the guy to explain the big fish.By now he knows that I never buy the big fish -- large fish fascinate, but terrify me -- but he explains them anyway.Today the guy is wearing a brown mohair sweater that looks like it was old when Ronald Reagan was a boy. But if you had to stand behind counters full of iced fish all day, you'd probably want a sweater, too. And you might not want to wear your best one."That's a mahi-mahi," he says, pointing at the big fish, artistically bent on the ice bed around a school of smaller fish.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 26, 2003
What's the correct way to rehydrate sun-dried tomatoes? Previously, I just soaked them in water and used them in my recipe, but they tasted bitter -- not at all like the sweet, juicy, plump tomatoes I've tasted in restaurant dishes. Thanks for your help. Unless you buy your sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil, they will need to be rehydrated with liquid. A rule of thumb is to cover sun-dried tomatoes with warm water and soak for two hours at room temperature. You can get a feel for how long they should soak by feeling how flexible they are -- the stiffer they are, the longer they should soak.
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By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | July 31, 1991
Even a stir-fry recipe can benefit from a simple low-fat makeover. By spraying the cold wok with non-stick coating rather than starting with oil, you'll save an average of 200 calories of fat per recipe.You can see the results below -- the low calorie count and fat content includes the zesty marinated chicken, the broccoli, brown rice and the tangy orange sauce.You'll have a head start on the sauce because you use some of the gingery tamari marinade to flavor it. Tamari is a soybean-based sauce that is slightly thicker and sweeter than soy sauce.
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