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By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
MOSCOW - The pro-Western government that swept to power in Ukraine's "Orange Revolution" collapsed yesterday when President Viktor A. Yushchenko fired his popular prime minister and accepted the resignations of other key political allies. Paralyzed with savage infighting among his supporters and stung by allegations of corruption surrounding the new democratic government, Yushchenko emptied the top ranks of his administration in a bid to reassert his leadership of the tumultuous nation of 47 million on the eastern edge of Europe.
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NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY AND VICTORIA BUTENKO and DAVID HOLLEY AND VICTORIA BUTENKO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Viktor F. Yanukovych, the humiliated loser two years ago when Orange Revolution protests forced a presidential runoff election to be repeated, completed a remarkable political comeback yesterday by becoming Ukraine's prime minister. Yanukovych swiftly declared that he intended to govern as a partner with President Viktor A. Yushchenko, his 2004 rival. Yushchenko ended months of political uncertainty Thursday by agreeing to nominate Yanukovych as prime minister rather than dissolve parliament and call new elections.
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NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez | September 23, 2005
KIEV, UKRAINE -- Struggling to find a way out of his country's deepening political crisis, President Viktor A. Yushchenko persuaded parliament to back his choice for prime minister yesterday, but only after striking a deal with the politician thousands of Ukrainians rallied against during last year's Orange Revolution. Parliament's approval of Yuriy Yekhanurov came just two days after lawmakers had rejected his nomination. He replaces Yushchenko's Orange Revolution ally, Yulia Tymoshenko, whom Yushchenko fired Sept.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Less than a year and a half ago, Viktor A. Yushchenko became president of Ukraine in a peaceful revolution and declared the beginning of a new political era that seemed destined to take firm hold and influence Ukraine's neighbors. He has been proved right, even as democratic change has followed a course that Yushchenko and promoters of civil society didn't expect. On Sunday, Yushchenko's party placed third in the first parliamentary elections since he became president.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 27, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Loathed by many Ukrainians during the Orange Revolution that reversed his rigged presidential victory in 2004, Viktor Yanukovych appeared to engineer the unlikeliest of political comebacks yesterday, as voters disillusioned with Ukraine's pro-West leadership elected a new parliament. Exit polls released late yesterday had Yanukovych's Party of Regions garnering the largest share of votes in a contest regarded as crucial to Ukraine's future. Recent constitutional changes transfer from the president to parliament the power to select a prime minister and much of the Cabinet.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY AND VICTORIA BUTENKO and DAVID HOLLEY AND VICTORIA BUTENKO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Viktor F. Yanukovych, the humiliated loser two years ago when Orange Revolution protests forced a presidential runoff election to be repeated, completed a remarkable political comeback yesterday by becoming Ukraine's prime minister. Yanukovych swiftly declared that he intended to govern as a partner with President Viktor A. Yushchenko, his 2004 rival. Yushchenko ended months of political uncertainty Thursday by agreeing to nominate Yanukovych as prime minister rather than dissolve parliament and call new elections.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Less than a year and a half after President Viktor A. Yushchenko rose to power in a historic contest filled with clashes over corruption and fraud, voters head into parliamentary elections today in which the tone is much closer to the nuanced politics expected of a democracy. The pro-Western coalition that brought Yushchenko victory through the Orange Revolution has broken up into competing factions. That sets the stage for a three-way race featuring the Party of Regions, headed by Viktor Yanukovich, the pro-Russian former prime minister who lost in the 2004 presidential race, Yushchenko's Our Ukraine and the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | February 11, 2005
WHO CAN FORGET the pockmarked face of Ukrainian President Viktor A. Yushchenko after his soup apparently was poisoned by dioxin during the recent presidential campaign? Tens of thousands of Ukrainians demonstrated peacefully against the rigging of the election in favor of Mr. Yushchenko's opponent, who was openly backed by Ukraine's big neighbor, Russia. Miraculously, grass-roots pressure worked - with European and U.S. support. A rematch on Dec. 26 reversed the election results. Recently, at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, I asked Mr. Yushchenko the $64,000 question: "Do you know who tried to kill you?"
NEWS
By LIONEL BEEHNER | December 30, 2005
Country after country in the former Soviet sphere has held up Ukraine as its model for democratic upheaval, down to the campaign tactic of adopting a dopey color. Why? A year after the Orange Revolution, polls show that most Ukrainians are dissatisfied with the direction of their country. The economy has tanked. Corruption remains endemic. And the reformist Cabinet was sacked in September for political infighting. Things are so bad that the party of Viktor F. Yanukovich, the pro-Kremlin stooge who lost last year's election runoff, has emerged as Ukraine's most popular political group.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 26, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - Huddling around space heaters inside their tents near Independence Square, the "Orange Revolution" faithful are nervous. Their candidate, opposition leader Viktor A. Yushchenko, is the clear favorite in today's repeat presidential runoff. Election law changes have been passed to prevent the kind of fraud that tainted the Nov. 21 runoff, won by Prime Minister Viktor F. Yanukovych. More than 12,000 international election observers are expected to scrutinize the voting. But this is Ukraine, where a presidential candidate was poisoned, where thugs appeared at polling stations to steal ballot boxes.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 27, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Loathed by many Ukrainians during the Orange Revolution that reversed his rigged presidential victory in 2004, Viktor Yanukovych appeared to engineer the unlikeliest of political comebacks yesterday, as voters disillusioned with Ukraine's pro-West leadership elected a new parliament. Exit polls released late yesterday had Yanukovych's Party of Regions garnering the largest share of votes in a contest regarded as crucial to Ukraine's future. Recent constitutional changes transfer from the president to parliament the power to select a prime minister and much of the Cabinet.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2006
KIEV, Ukraine -- Less than a year and a half after President Viktor A. Yushchenko rose to power in a historic contest filled with clashes over corruption and fraud, voters head into parliamentary elections today in which the tone is much closer to the nuanced politics expected of a democracy. The pro-Western coalition that brought Yushchenko victory through the Orange Revolution has broken up into competing factions. That sets the stage for a three-way race featuring the Party of Regions, headed by Viktor Yanukovich, the pro-Russian former prime minister who lost in the 2004 presidential race, Yushchenko's Our Ukraine and the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 13, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- Anatoly Lebedko keeps a bouquet of miniature flags next to his office desk, including one that commemorates the Orange Revolution in neighboring Ukraine. For him, an opposition politician in Belarus, a country seemingly trapped in Soviet-style politics, the flag is a reminder that the impossible sometimes is possible. In Ukraine, thousands of orange-clad demonstrators peacefully brought to power in 2004 a president who promised democratic rule. Lebedko was in the crowds there, and he couldn't help but imagine revolution also shaking Belarus.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 11, 2006
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's parliament fired the country's prime minister and Cabinet yesterday to protest the government's handling of the recent gas price war with Russia, a move political experts said was an attempt to weaken the beleaguered Orange Revolution bloc ahead of crucial legislative elections this spring. Parliament ordered Prime Minister Yuri Yekhanurov and his Cabinet to stay on until a new Cabinet can be formed. President Viktor A. Yushchenko denounced the move as unconstitutional and said he would challenge it in court.
NEWS
By LIONEL BEEHNER | December 30, 2005
Country after country in the former Soviet sphere has held up Ukraine as its model for democratic upheaval, down to the campaign tactic of adopting a dopey color. Why? A year after the Orange Revolution, polls show that most Ukrainians are dissatisfied with the direction of their country. The economy has tanked. Corruption remains endemic. And the reformist Cabinet was sacked in September for political infighting. Things are so bad that the party of Viktor F. Yanukovich, the pro-Kremlin stooge who lost last year's election runoff, has emerged as Ukraine's most popular political group.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez | September 23, 2005
KIEV, UKRAINE -- Struggling to find a way out of his country's deepening political crisis, President Viktor A. Yushchenko persuaded parliament to back his choice for prime minister yesterday, but only after striking a deal with the politician thousands of Ukrainians rallied against during last year's Orange Revolution. Parliament's approval of Yuriy Yekhanurov came just two days after lawmakers had rejected his nomination. He replaces Yushchenko's Orange Revolution ally, Yulia Tymoshenko, whom Yushchenko fired Sept.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 13, 2006
MINSK, Belarus -- Anatoly Lebedko keeps a bouquet of miniature flags next to his office desk, including one that commemorates the Orange Revolution in neighboring Ukraine. For him, an opposition politician in Belarus, a country seemingly trapped in Soviet-style politics, the flag is a reminder that the impossible sometimes is possible. In Ukraine, thousands of orange-clad demonstrators peacefully brought to power in 2004 a president who promised democratic rule. Lebedko was in the crowds there, and he couldn't help but imagine revolution also shaking Belarus.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 11, 2006
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's parliament fired the country's prime minister and Cabinet yesterday to protest the government's handling of the recent gas price war with Russia, a move political experts said was an attempt to weaken the beleaguered Orange Revolution bloc ahead of crucial legislative elections this spring. Parliament ordered Prime Minister Yuri Yekhanurov and his Cabinet to stay on until a new Cabinet can be formed. President Viktor A. Yushchenko denounced the move as unconstitutional and said he would challenge it in court.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
MOSCOW - The pro-Western government that swept to power in Ukraine's "Orange Revolution" collapsed yesterday when President Viktor A. Yushchenko fired his popular prime minister and accepted the resignations of other key political allies. Paralyzed with savage infighting among his supporters and stung by allegations of corruption surrounding the new democratic government, Yushchenko emptied the top ranks of his administration in a bid to reassert his leadership of the tumultuous nation of 47 million on the eastern edge of Europe.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | February 11, 2005
WHO CAN FORGET the pockmarked face of Ukrainian President Viktor A. Yushchenko after his soup apparently was poisoned by dioxin during the recent presidential campaign? Tens of thousands of Ukrainians demonstrated peacefully against the rigging of the election in favor of Mr. Yushchenko's opponent, who was openly backed by Ukraine's big neighbor, Russia. Miraculously, grass-roots pressure worked - with European and U.S. support. A rematch on Dec. 26 reversed the election results. Recently, at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, I asked Mr. Yushchenko the $64,000 question: "Do you know who tried to kill you?"
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