Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOrange Order
IN THE NEWS

Orange Order

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1999
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The British government in Northern Ireland approved yesterday the holding of a perennially contentious Protestant Orange Order parade tomorrow near a Roman Catholic neighborhood in Belfast, the capital of the northern province.Despite the Catholic residents' objections that the event could produce violent clashes, as it has in the past, the Parades Commission said the Orange march could muster in a park across the narrow Lagan River, several hundred yards from the Catholic enclave on Lower Ormeau Road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 15, 2005
LONDON - After four nights of gunfire and Molotov cocktails, the latest outbreak of Protestant violence in Belfast's streets appears to be waning, but yesterday the British government formally declared the Ulster Volunteer Force, the paramilitary group behind the violence, to be in violation of its 1994 cease-fire agreement. "What I've done in this decision overnight is to send an absolutely crystal clear signal to everybody that we will not tolerate violence," said Peter Hain, the government's Northern Ireland secretary.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Rejecting pleas from political and religious leaders, officials with the Protestant-led Orange Order vowed last night to continue their protest "indefinitely" at Portadown's Drumcree Church.The anguished calls to halt the standoff came after the early morning killings of three young Roman Catholic brothers, who burned to death in their beds after a firebomb blast at their home in Ballymoney.Occurring after a week of growing religious unrest in the British-ruled province, with homes firebombed, cars hijacked and police attacked by Protestant rioters, the deaths of the Quinn brothers, Richard 11, Mark, 10, and Jason, 8, stunned Northern Ireland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1999
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The British government in Northern Ireland approved yesterday the holding of a perennially contentious Protestant Orange Order parade tomorrow near a Roman Catholic neighborhood in Belfast, the capital of the northern province.Despite the Catholic residents' objections that the event could produce violent clashes, as it has in the past, the Parades Commission said the Orange march could muster in a park across the narrow Lagan River, several hundred yards from the Catholic enclave on Lower Ormeau Road.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1997
DUBLIN, Ireland -- In a concession intended to prevent renewed sectarian violence in Northern Ireland this weekend, the Protestant Orange Order said yesterday that it would not hold parades through areas where Roman Catholic residents have threatened to block them.The Orange Order, an all-male Protestant group considered anti-Catholic by many of the Catholic minority in the Protestant-dominated Ulster, said its units would not march through potentially volatile areas tomorrow.Tomorrow's parades were planned to celebrate the victory of the Protestant forces of William of Orange over his Catholic father-in-law, King James II, at the Battle of the Boyne on July 12, 1690.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 1998
PORTADOWN, Northern Ireland -- Once again, Northern Ireland is shrouded in fear because of a parade. For the third year running, the British province is being brought to a standstill by the standoff at Drumcree Church.To Alan Milligan, this might be the last stand of the Protestant Orange Order. If Orangemen can't march along a disputed route, he believes, then their way of life, and their culture, will eventually be destroyed."All we're asking for is nine minutes of tolerance," he says.To Donna O'Hara, a Roman Catholic housewife, it's time for the Orangemen to find a new path that avoids her neighborhood.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 11, 1998
LONDON -- In a bid to quell the violence that has threatened to destroy Northern Ireland's fragile peace, Protestant Orange Order marchers and embattled Roman Catholic residents in Portadown yesterday accepted a British government offer to enter indirect talks.Thousands of the Orange Order marchers camped on a hillside by Drumcree Church are seeking to defy a government ban on their parade along the Garvaghy Road, while the Catholic residents want the parade rerouted.The standoff that began Sunday has left Northern Ireland on a knife edge, with cars and homes burned while police are attacked by rioters.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 15, 2005
LONDON - After four nights of gunfire and Molotov cocktails, the latest outbreak of Protestant violence in Belfast's streets appears to be waning, but yesterday the British government formally declared the Ulster Volunteer Force, the paramilitary group behind the violence, to be in violation of its 1994 cease-fire agreement. "What I've done in this decision overnight is to send an absolutely crystal clear signal to everybody that we will not tolerate violence," said Peter Hain, the government's Northern Ireland secretary.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
Md. state prosecutor not driven by politics to conduct his probeThe article by William F. Zorzi and Greg Garland "Scandals place Maryland prosecutor in spotlight" (July 9) was both fair and accurate. The Office of Special Prosecutor in Maryland is the one agency within the state government that succeeds in staying out of politics.Obviously, no one is happy to hear that he or she is the subject of an investigation. Those people or their attorneys will put their own spin on any investigation.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 14, 1998
RASHARKIN, Northern Ireland -- The thump of Orange Order drums and the lilt of accordions and flutes marching by could be heard inside the home where three small, white coffins lay in a bedroom."
NEWS
July 15, 1998
Md. state prosecutor not driven by politics to conduct his probeThe article by William F. Zorzi and Greg Garland "Scandals place Maryland prosecutor in spotlight" (July 9) was both fair and accurate. The Office of Special Prosecutor in Maryland is the one agency within the state government that succeeds in staying out of politics.Obviously, no one is happy to hear that he or she is the subject of an investigation. Those people or their attorneys will put their own spin on any investigation.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 14, 1998
RASHARKIN, Northern Ireland -- The thump of Orange Order drums and the lilt of accordions and flutes marching by could be heard inside the home where three small, white coffins lay in a bedroom."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Rejecting pleas from political and religious leaders, officials with the Protestant-led Orange Order vowed last night to continue their protest "indefinitely" at Portadown's Drumcree Church.The anguished calls to halt the standoff came after the early morning killings of three young Roman Catholic brothers, who burned to death in their beds after a firebomb blast at their home in Ballymoney.Occurring after a week of growing religious unrest in the British-ruled province, with homes firebombed, cars hijacked and police attacked by Protestant rioters, the deaths of the Quinn brothers, Richard 11, Mark, 10, and Jason, 8, stunned Northern Ireland.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 11, 1998
LONDON -- In a bid to quell the violence that has threatened to destroy Northern Ireland's fragile peace, Protestant Orange Order marchers and embattled Roman Catholic residents in Portadown yesterday accepted a British government offer to enter indirect talks.Thousands of the Orange Order marchers camped on a hillside by Drumcree Church are seeking to defy a government ban on their parade along the Garvaghy Road, while the Catholic residents want the parade rerouted.The standoff that began Sunday has left Northern Ireland on a knife edge, with cars and homes burned while police are attacked by rioters.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 8, 1998
PORTADOWN, Northern Ireland -- Once again, Northern Ireland is shrouded in fear because of a parade. For the third year running, the British province is being brought to a standstill by the standoff at Drumcree Church.To Alan Milligan, this might be the last stand of the Protestant Orange Order. If Orangemen can't march along a disputed route, he believes, then their way of life, and their culture, will eventually be destroyed."All we're asking for is nine minutes of tolerance," he says.To Donna O'Hara, a Roman Catholic housewife, it's time for the Orangemen to find a new path that avoids her neighborhood.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1997
DUBLIN, Ireland -- In a concession intended to prevent renewed sectarian violence in Northern Ireland this weekend, the Protestant Orange Order said yesterday that it would not hold parades through areas where Roman Catholic residents have threatened to block them.The Orange Order, an all-male Protestant group considered anti-Catholic by many of the Catholic minority in the Protestant-dominated Ulster, said its units would not march through potentially volatile areas tomorrow.Tomorrow's parades were planned to celebrate the victory of the Protestant forces of William of Orange over his Catholic father-in-law, King James II, at the Battle of the Boyne on July 12, 1690.
NEWS
July 17, 1998
MEMORY is potent in Northern Ireland. Currently, it is memory of the Sunningdale agreement, which produced a brief provincial government in 1974. This was the model for the latest accord that has led to power-sharing between Protestant and Catholic parties.The Protestant Unionist Party today narrowly favors the current experiment, which its leader, David Trimble heads. The Protestant Orange Order, traditionally interlocked with the party, opposes it.Intransigents are using protests over a disputed Orange Order parade, which was re-routed away from a Catholic neighborhood in Portadown, for a larger political purpose.
NEWS
By ASSSOCIATED PRESS | July 11, 2000
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - Protestant hard-liners angry over restrictions on their traditional July parades mounted mass street protests yesterday, forcing shops to close early and inspiring more violence across Northern Ireland. Despite calls for peaceful protests by the leaders of the Orange Order brotherhood, trouble broke out within minutes in Belfast and other towns. Along the so-called "peace line," a network of fences and walls separating British Protestant and Irish Catholic communities in west Belfast, youths on both sides traded salvos of bottles and rocks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.