Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOral History
IN THE NEWS

Oral History

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
June 13, 2012
June if a festive month for young people! Graduations and special events! This year just happens to be particularly significant in the lives of some very deserving students. Harford County has been participating in the Smithsonian Journey Stories Youth Oral History Project for the past four months, and on June 2 presented at the Hosanna School Museum one of the first exhibitions in the country. In a remarkably short time, many groups came together to present a program thanks to the Smithsonian Institution, the Maryland Humanities Council, Harford County Public Library, the Historical Society of Harford County and the Havre de Grace Boys and Girls Club.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 17, 2014
The Historical Society of Harford County will open its doors on Saturday, Jan. 18, to share it rich collections detailing the history of the county. The special open house, called "History on Parade," will present an extensive collection of authors, books, pamphlets, artwork, videos, playbills and experts that are all available to anyone interested in almost any aspect of life in Harford County, explains Larry Carmichael, the Historical Society's publicity chairman. "History on Parade" will run from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the society's headquarters at 143 N. Main St. in Bel Air. There is no admission charge.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
In the 1990s and early 2000s, the HFStival was a summit for area alt-rock lovers. Organized by the late WHFS-FM, the festival boasted acts such as the Violent Femmes, Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Coldplay, as well as myriad local and regional bands. It was many firsts for many people: Their first concert, their first time crowd surfing, their first time in a mosh pit. Saturday, the HFStival returns to Merriweather Post Pavilion , the site of the last HFStival in 2006.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2012
June if a festive month for young people! Graduations and special events! This year just happens to be particularly significant in the lives of some very deserving students. Harford County has been participating in the Smithsonian Journey Stories Youth Oral History Project for the past four months, and on June 2 presented at the Hosanna School Museum one of the first exhibitions in the country. In a remarkably short time, many groups came together to present a program thanks to the Smithsonian Institution, the Maryland Humanities Council, Harford County Public Library, the Historical Society of Harford County and the Havre de Grace Boys and Girls Club.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 22, 2012
Former Cleveland Browns and soon-to-be-former Denver Broncos quarterback Brady Quinn is being scrutinized for honest comments he made about Broncos teammate Tim Tebow to GQ magazine during the 2011 season. Ravens linebacker and 2011 NFL Defensive Player of the Year Terrell Suggs was also quoted by Michael Silver in “An Oral History of Tebow Time” -- and it seems Suggs eventually became a believer by the season's end. Here's an oral history of Suggs on Tebow based on a few quotes Silver used in his article in GQ's March issue . Week 8, after the Detroit Lions beat the Broncos: “They say we were giving him a hard time because he's a Christian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett | August 1, 1996
Although not connected with the AFRAM festival, the Maryland Humanities Council (which is a member of the Coalition for Maryland History and Culture) is presenting "The African-American Experience in Maryland" on Saturday. It takes place at Baltimore City Community College, 2901 Liberty Heights Ave., from 9: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. The free public forums will focus on family roots, oral history, family photographs, documents and artifacts.This is the fifth of six scheduled presentations that are being held around the state.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | June 6, 1993
LET US BEGIN ANEW:AN ORAL HISTORY OFTHE KENNEDY PRESIDENCY.Gerald S. andDeborah R. Strober.HarperCollins.540 pages. $25.THE KENNEDY LEGACY.Theodore C. Sorenson.MacMillan.414 pages. $22. Of books about the Kennedys there is no end, to paraphrase historian V. O. Key. Here are a couple more.The first proceeds from an interesting premise. The authors, newcomers to political writing, interviewed 140 women and men (practically all men) who knew John F. Kennedy in some political context, 26 to 28 years after his death.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 11, 2000
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Bernie Tschirhart taps his temple, remembering the kamikaze attack that almost destroyed his ship 55 years ago. The Shawnee, Kan., man was a gunner's mate on the USS Mullany in World War II. On April 6, 1945, the destroyer was stationed off Okinawa when a Japanese suicide pilot drew a bead on the Mullany and slammed his plane into the ship. Shrapnel from that collision lies beneath the skin of Tschirhart's temple. "It happened so fast" says Tschirhart, now age 74. Dozens of sailors were killed in the attack.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
In song, drama and craft, a Westminster music-and-arts festival is retelling stories from the Underground Railroad, relying on oral history and scant information culled from letters, diaries and memoirs to describe treacherous flights to freedom. Common Ground on the Hill, which opened this week for its ninth season at McDaniel College, has organized several classes on the dangers of escape routes, the safe houses that dotted the countryside, the freedom seekers and those who aided them, including the well-known abolitionist John Brown.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
Dorothy Baker remembers opening an Elkridge beauty shop in 1945, when World War II limited her ability to get hair clips, bobby pins or other metal equipment. Louise Fields Blackstone remembers when she was 17 and earned $6 a week cooking, caring for two children and serving three meals a day for a family at Lawyers Hill and Montgomery Roads in Elkridge. Russell Moxley remembers being chief of police in Ellicott City in the 1930s and 1940s and providing his own uniform, gun, car and receptionist (his wife)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 22, 2012
Former Cleveland Browns and soon-to-be-former Denver Broncos quarterback Brady Quinn is being scrutinized for honest comments he made about Broncos teammate Tim Tebow to GQ magazine during the 2011 season. Ravens linebacker and 2011 NFL Defensive Player of the Year Terrell Suggs was also quoted by Michael Silver in “An Oral History of Tebow Time” -- and it seems Suggs eventually became a believer by the season's end. Here's an oral history of Suggs on Tebow based on a few quotes Silver used in his article in GQ's March issue . Week 8, after the Detroit Lions beat the Broncos: “They say we were giving him a hard time because he's a Christian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
In the 1990s and early 2000s, the HFStival was a summit for area alt-rock lovers. Organized by the late WHFS-FM, the festival boasted acts such as the Violent Femmes, Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Coldplay, as well as myriad local and regional bands. It was many firsts for many people: Their first concert, their first time crowd surfing, their first time in a mosh pit. Saturday, the HFStival returns to Merriweather Post Pavilion , the site of the last HFStival in 2006.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2009
Last weekend, Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre opened Quilters: The Musical, which celebrates American womanhood as told through the experiences of 19th-century pioneer women. In the current issue of Applause, co-author and composer/lyricist Barbara Damashek describes Quilters "as a theatrical event of the early 1980s, a piece of oral history and feminist musical theater. ... It was one of the earlier explorations in the '80s of the use of oral history and monology as the source for plays."
NEWS
November 8, 2008
Studs Terkel, who died on the last day of October at his home in Chicago, made an art of oral history. He was a character and a treasure and, in his own words, a uniquely American voice. What has happened to the human voice? Vox Humana. Hollering, shouting, quiet talking, buzz. I was leaving the airport, this is in Atlanta. You know, you leave the gate, you take a train that took you to concourse of your choice. And I get into this train. Dead silence. Few people seated or standing. Up above you hear a voice.
NEWS
April 2, 2008
To learn more about attending the "Baltimore '68 Riots and Rebirth" conference at the University of Baltimore, go to www.ubalt.edu/baltimore68 or call 410-837-4079. If you are interested in providing an oral history of your experiences from April 1968, call 410-837-5296.
NEWS
By Jon Meacham and Jon Meacham,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Touch and Go By Studs Terkel New Press / 270 pages / $24.95 In the beginning, before blogs, there was Studs Terkel, who, more than anyone else in what Time-Life founder Henry Luce called the American Century, gave the great mass of Americans who were not Henry Luce a way to be heard. "I have, after a fashion, been celebrated for having celebrated the lives of the uncelebrated among us; for lending voice to the face in the crowd," Terkel, now 95, writes in Touch and Go, his new memoir.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 21, 2007
Two weeks ago on Real Time With Bill Maher, it was shocking to hear Mos Def, maybe the best actor in pictures today, express his belief that Sept. 11 was an inside job and the moon landing was a set-up. In the Shadow of the Moon, a vibrant documentary on the Apollo missions, is so inspiring it could turn conspiracy theorists like Mos Def into true believers. It's both irrefutably concrete and irresistibly uplifting. The British director David Sington uses stunning archival footage and a string of interviews with astronauts to construct a personal history of the race to beat the Soviets to the moon that has the buildup, velocity, setbacks and catharses of a classic drama.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.