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By Dr. Neil Solomon and Dr. Neil Solomon,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 28, 1992
Dear Dr. Solomon: I started using a mouthwash after a dental hygienist recommended it. But it burned my mouth so much that I soon stopped using it. I usually follow the recommendations of my doctor and dentist, but I'm wondering if something that burns as much as that mouthwash can actually be good for you. -- Dale, Reston, Va.Dear Dale: I suggest you check the mouthwash for its alcohol content. The results of a study indicate that the regular use of a mouthwash that has a high alcohol content may increase the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer.
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NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Tobacco manufacturers call it chew or snuff and extol the product as a smokeless alternative to cigarettes.Joe Garagiola calls it "spit tobacco."" 'Spit' is a gross, ugly word, not part of dinner-time conversation," said Garagiola, a former major league catcher and popular television figureWhat spit tobacco, the leading cause of oral cancer, can do to users is even uglier, he told about 140 children yesterday at a 4-H camp near Westminster."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Deborah A. Rice, a former software designer and volunteer, died Monday of head and neck cancer at her Timonium home. She was 42. Deborah A. Budacz, the daughter of a steamship executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1985, she earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Loyola College. Mrs. Rice went to work for Century Computing, a Laurel software development company, as a member of a team that developed software for certain control systems used on the NASA space shuttles.
NEWS
By Valerie Reitman and Valerie Reitman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2004
A growing number of anti-smoking researchers and public health advocates are adopting a tactic that not long ago would have been considered heresy: saying that hard-core smokers who can't kick the habit would be better off switching to new smokeless tobacco products. With slogans such as "Spit-free" and "For when you can't smoke," these products differ markedly from the messy snuff and chewing tobacco stereotypes associated with your granddad's spittoon or pro baseball players' stuffed cheeks.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Two Maryland youths have joined the battle against "spit tobacco."Winning posters designed by Jonathan Adams, 11, of Sykesville and Christian Davis, 14, of Tyaskin near Salisbury, are part of a national campaign to eradicate the leading cause of oral cancer.The boys won "really cool seats" for Monday's Orioles game against Minnesota."It was a great game," said Christian, who rarely gets to Camden Yards from his home in Wicomico County. "We got to see Eddie [Murray] on his first time back."
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
The picture of the man who accompanies him into clubhouses is indelibly stamped in Joe Garagiola's mind: former major-leaguer Bill Tuttle, half of his jaw gone, his face distorted after five operations for cancer brought on by chewing tobacco."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | June 3, 2005
Within two years, you may be able to go for a regular dental visit, spit into a cup and before your appointment is over, find out from an analysis of your saliva whether you're at risk for oral cancer. Currently, dentists have to do a thorough mouth exam to probe for oral cancer, which will strike more than 28,000 Americans a year and kill more than 7,000. Within a few more years, a fancier spit test may determine whether you're at risk for a number of other diseases as well, including breast cancer, Type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | January 20, 2006
Is it OK to listen to TV, music or tapes while falling asleep? I have been using books on tape or CDs to help me fall asleep for years. The only problem I've found is that the book has to have just the right level of stimulation - not so difficult that I have to work to follow the thread, but not so exciting that it keeps me awake. Sonia Ancoli-Israel, a psychologist at the University of California, San Diego, said that "falling asleep to a tape or the TV is not a bad thing if it helps you relax and fall asleep.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1995
THE SEVERNA PARK Newcomers Club is a resource for meeting residents through a variety of interest groups and social activities. The group has expanded its base to provide a network of civic volunteers.Last month, newcomer volunteers helped paint the interior of the YWCA Domestic Violence Shelter.Newcomers are also helping with the shelter's fall landscaping.Jan Clark, director of the YWCA shelter, will speak at the November general luncheon meeting from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Chartwell Country Club.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
The sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer in women has now been linked to an uptick of throat, tonsil and tongue cancers - in a younger and healthier group of patients than doctors have ever seen before. These head and neck cancers were once the scourge of older men - mostly the result of lifetimes of heavy smoking and drinking. The treatments often left victims disfigured. But with those cases on the decline, doctors are seeing a new group of victims. They're men in their 40s, and even 30s, whose cancer is brought on by the increasingly common human papillomavirus (HPV)
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | April 3, 2008
About 40,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. Caught early, many oral cancers are considered by doctors to be curable. But the key is early diagnosis, says Dr. Christine G. Gourin, associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Clinical Research Program in Head and Neck Cancer. To help publicize the warning signs of this disease, the third week of this month has been named oral, head and neck cancer awareness week, she says.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | January 20, 2006
Is it OK to listen to TV, music or tapes while falling asleep? I have been using books on tape or CDs to help me fall asleep for years. The only problem I've found is that the book has to have just the right level of stimulation - not so difficult that I have to work to follow the thread, but not so exciting that it keeps me awake. Sonia Ancoli-Israel, a psychologist at the University of California, San Diego, said that "falling asleep to a tape or the TV is not a bad thing if it helps you relax and fall asleep.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | June 3, 2005
Within two years, you may be able to go for a regular dental visit, spit into a cup and before your appointment is over, find out from an analysis of your saliva whether you're at risk for oral cancer. Currently, dentists have to do a thorough mouth exam to probe for oral cancer, which will strike more than 28,000 Americans a year and kill more than 7,000. Within a few more years, a fancier spit test may determine whether you're at risk for a number of other diseases as well, including breast cancer, Type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
The discovery that the painkillers Vioxx and Celebrex may increase the risk of heart problems wasn't just a disappointment to people with chronic pain and the doctors who treat them. The news has threatened to cut off a promising arm of research in cancer prevention. For the last decade, scientists have been compiling evidence that those and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to interfere with the early processes that can give rise to cancer, particularly cancers of the digestive tract.
NEWS
April 11, 2005
TODAY Madeleine Albright lecture Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright will talk about women in leadership in America at 7:30 p.m. at the LeClerc Auditorium at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 4701 N. Charles St. She also will discuss her autobiography, Madam Secretary: A Memoir. The lecture is free. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. 410-532-5556, or www.ndm.edu. TOMORROW Redistricting committee The Carroll County Commission Redistricting Committee will meet at 7 p.m. in the Westminster Senior Center's large meeting room, 125 Stoner Ave. A five-member Board of County Commissioners will be elected by district in the 2006 election.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Deborah A. Rice, a former software designer and volunteer, died Monday of head and neck cancer at her Timonium home. She was 42. Deborah A. Budacz, the daughter of a steamship executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1985, she earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Loyola College. Mrs. Rice went to work for Century Computing, a Laurel software development company, as a member of a team that developed software for certain control systems used on the NASA space shuttles.
NEWS
By Valerie Reitman and Valerie Reitman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2004
A growing number of anti-smoking researchers and public health advocates are adopting a tactic that not long ago would have been considered heresy: saying that hard-core smokers who can't kick the habit would be better off switching to new smokeless tobacco products. With slogans such as "Spit-free" and "For when you can't smoke," these products differ markedly from the messy snuff and chewing tobacco stereotypes associated with your granddad's spittoon or pro baseball players' stuffed cheeks.
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