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By Marc Arkin and Marc Arkin,Special to The Sun | July 2, 1995
"Saints and Schemers: Opus Dei and Its Paradoxes," by Joan Estruch. Translated by Elizabeth Ladd Glick. 352 pages. New York: Oxford University Press. $27.50On May 17, 1992, more than 200,000 people, including 33 cardinals and 200 bishops, assembled under the hot sun in Saint Peter's square to watch Pope John Paul II beatify Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer. It was a mere 17 years after Msgr. Escriva's death and seemed to betoken a swift ascent to sainthood for the founder of Opus Dei, the secretive traditionalist organization within the Catholic Church whose ties reach from Franco Spain to Latin America and the Philippines, with allies as various as Belgium's Queen Fabiola, Italy's Northern League and influential members of the Vatican curia.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 15, 2013
Dan Brown, who is know for mixing science, religion and history into his thrillers, announced today that his latest book will focus on "The Inferno," by Dante Alighieri. Brown's latest blockbuster-to-be, "Inferno," follows "The Lost Symbol" and "The Da Vinci Code," which highlighted mysteries behind such topics as the U.S. Capitol, da Vinci's The Last Supper, Masons and Opus Dei. The publisher said the new book will again feature Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon and "is set in Italy and centers on one of history's most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces, Dante's Inferno.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 1992
ROME -- In one of the most hotly debated acts of his papacy, Pope John Paul II beatified the Spanish founder of the conservative Opus Dei religious movement yesterday, elevating Monsignor Jose Maria Escriva de Balaguer to a status just short of sainthood, 17 years after his death.The crowd overflowing St. Peter's Square numbered more than 200,000 and was one of the biggest ever seen at the Vatican -- testimony to the reach and influence that inspire many liberal Catholics to label Opus Dei a sinister and powerful force for conservatism in the church and elsewhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Debruge, Variety | May 5, 2011
Intriguing title aside, the mythical fire-breathers in "There Be Dragons" are strictly metaphorical. In both ambition and approach, "Dragons" echoes Roland Joffe's career-defining early work as he brings sweeping production values to overtly Christian subject matter, tracking the life of Opus Dei founder and modern-day Catholic saint Josemaria Escriva against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. Overlong and unnecessarily burdened by...
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
NEW YORK -- For most of its existence, Opus Dei has maintained a low profile within the Roman Catholic Church, content to pursue its work of helping a mostly lay membership grow closer to God in everyday life without drawing attention to itself - even as the popular image grew of a secretive sect that wielded disproportionate influence at the Vatican. Now a fictional albino monk is bringing the organization into the spotlight. Silas, the supposed Opus Dei monk who cuts a bloody swath through The Da Vinci Code, has drawn protests from the real-life organization since the novel was published three years ago. With the Ron Howard film of Dan Brown's blockbuster novel due out Friday, Opus Dei has launched an unprecedented campaign to explain the much-discussed but little-understood spiritual path that 3,000 adherents in the United States call "The Work."
NEWS
January 18, 1997
Frank Angelo, 49, a co-founder of M.A.C. cosmetics, a line known for its innovative advertising, died Sunday of cardiac arrest after surgery in Florida. Mr. Angelo was in Coral Gables planning the opening of a M.A.C. boutique in Miami Beach. He co-founded the Toronto-based company in 1985. M.A.C. was lauded for its bold advertisements and promotions, which featured the likes of transvestite entertainer RuPaul and singer k. d. lang. In 1994, Mr. Angelo founded the M.A.C. AIDS fund, which has raised $5.5 million to finance education on and prevention of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as services to those with the disease.
NEWS
March 24, 1994
* Bishop Alvaro del Portillo, 80, leader of the controversial and conservative Roman Catholic organization Opus Dei, died of a heart attack yesterday in Rome. The bishop, a Spaniard, had been Opus Dei's leader since the death of the organization's founder, Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, in 1975. Opus Dei (God's Work) has 77,000 lay members worldwide who receive spiritual guidance from the movement's 1,500 priests. The organization has for decades fended off criticism from liberal Catholics who accuse it of being secretive and elitist and of trying to create a church within the church.
NEWS
November 17, 2009
On November 12, 2009 Estelle C. Jendrek Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26) on Tuesday from 6 to 8 P.M. and Wednesday from 2 to 4 and and 6 to 8 P.M. A funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Anthony of Padua Church on Thursday at 10:00 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Opus Dei, Clevemont Center, 2709 36th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20007.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 15, 2013
Dan Brown, who is know for mixing science, religion and history into his thrillers, announced today that his latest book will focus on "The Inferno," by Dante Alighieri. Brown's latest blockbuster-to-be, "Inferno," follows "The Lost Symbol" and "The Da Vinci Code," which highlighted mysteries behind such topics as the U.S. Capitol, da Vinci's The Last Supper, Masons and Opus Dei. The publisher said the new book will again feature Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon and "is set in Italy and centers on one of history's most enduring and mysterious literary masterpieces, Dante's Inferno.
NEWS
By Andrew M. Greeley | June 23, 1994
Rome -- IT'S NO secret in this city that the pope is ill.How ill he is and what is the nature of his illness is debated everywhere. One rumor is as good as another, and there's no point in paying any attention to most of them.Clearly, however, the church is in a "fin du regime" situation, but no one is sure how long that could last.It's a grisly business, this speculation on the pope's health, made no less grisly by the fact that no one ever believes the Vatican is telling the truth about any pope's health.
NEWS
November 17, 2009
On November 12, 2009 Estelle C. Jendrek Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26) on Tuesday from 6 to 8 P.M. and Wednesday from 2 to 4 and and 6 to 8 P.M. A funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Anthony of Padua Church on Thursday at 10:00 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to Opus Dei, Clevemont Center, 2709 36th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20007.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
NEW YORK -- For most of its existence, Opus Dei has maintained a low profile within the Roman Catholic Church, content to pursue its work of helping a mostly lay membership grow closer to God in everyday life without drawing attention to itself - even as the popular image grew of a secretive sect that wielded disproportionate influence at the Vatican. Now a fictional albino monk is bringing the organization into the spotlight. Silas, the supposed Opus Dei monk who cuts a bloody swath through The Da Vinci Code, has drawn protests from the real-life organization since the novel was published three years ago. With the Ron Howard film of Dan Brown's blockbuster novel due out Friday, Opus Dei has launched an unprecedented campaign to explain the much-discussed but little-understood spiritual path that 3,000 adherents in the United States call "The Work."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | August 17, 2003
In the early 1980s, when President Ronald Reagan fired up his rhetoric about the Evil Empire, top Soviet military and intelligence officials took him seriously. Believing that Reagan might attempt a nuclear surprise attack, they gave their intelligence outposts in the West orders to hunt for any hint that a missile attack might be imminent. One directive ordered Soviet spies to track the price of blood, on the shaky theory that authorities would purchase large blood supplies in preparation for war. Another required officers to monitor lights on at night in key government buildings in Western capitals, according to Christopher Andrew and Oleg Gordievsky's lively 1991 history, KGB: The Inside Story (HarperCollins, 832 pages, $20)
NEWS
January 18, 1997
Frank Angelo, 49, a co-founder of M.A.C. cosmetics, a line known for its innovative advertising, died Sunday of cardiac arrest after surgery in Florida. Mr. Angelo was in Coral Gables planning the opening of a M.A.C. boutique in Miami Beach. He co-founded the Toronto-based company in 1985. M.A.C. was lauded for its bold advertisements and promotions, which featured the likes of transvestite entertainer RuPaul and singer k. d. lang. In 1994, Mr. Angelo founded the M.A.C. AIDS fund, which has raised $5.5 million to finance education on and prevention of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as well as services to those with the disease.
NEWS
By Marc Arkin and Marc Arkin,Special to The Sun | July 2, 1995
"Saints and Schemers: Opus Dei and Its Paradoxes," by Joan Estruch. Translated by Elizabeth Ladd Glick. 352 pages. New York: Oxford University Press. $27.50On May 17, 1992, more than 200,000 people, including 33 cardinals and 200 bishops, assembled under the hot sun in Saint Peter's square to watch Pope John Paul II beatify Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer. It was a mere 17 years after Msgr. Escriva's death and seemed to betoken a swift ascent to sainthood for the founder of Opus Dei, the secretive traditionalist organization within the Catholic Church whose ties reach from Franco Spain to Latin America and the Philippines, with allies as various as Belgium's Queen Fabiola, Italy's Northern League and influential members of the Vatican curia.
NEWS
By Andrew M. Greeley | June 23, 1994
Rome -- IT'S NO secret in this city that the pope is ill.How ill he is and what is the nature of his illness is debated everywhere. One rumor is as good as another, and there's no point in paying any attention to most of them.Clearly, however, the church is in a "fin du regime" situation, but no one is sure how long that could last.It's a grisly business, this speculation on the pope's health, made no less grisly by the fact that no one ever believes the Vatican is telling the truth about any pope's health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff | August 17, 2003
In the early 1980s, when President Ronald Reagan fired up his rhetoric about the Evil Empire, top Soviet military and intelligence officials took him seriously. Believing that Reagan might attempt a nuclear surprise attack, they gave their intelligence outposts in the West orders to hunt for any hint that a missile attack might be imminent. One directive ordered Soviet spies to track the price of blood, on the shaky theory that authorities would purchase large blood supplies in preparation for war. Another required officers to monitor lights on at night in key government buildings in Western capitals, according to Christopher Andrew and Oleg Gordievsky's lively 1991 history, KGB: The Inside Story (HarperCollins, 832 pages, $20)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Debruge, Variety | May 5, 2011
Intriguing title aside, the mythical fire-breathers in "There Be Dragons" are strictly metaphorical. In both ambition and approach, "Dragons" echoes Roland Joffe's career-defining early work as he brings sweeping production values to overtly Christian subject matter, tracking the life of Opus Dei founder and modern-day Catholic saint Josemaria Escriva against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. Overlong and unnecessarily burdened by...
NEWS
March 24, 1994
* Bishop Alvaro del Portillo, 80, leader of the controversial and conservative Roman Catholic organization Opus Dei, died of a heart attack yesterday in Rome. The bishop, a Spaniard, had been Opus Dei's leader since the death of the organization's founder, Monsignor Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, in 1975. Opus Dei (God's Work) has 77,000 lay members worldwide who receive spiritual guidance from the movement's 1,500 priests. The organization has for decades fended off criticism from liberal Catholics who accuse it of being secretive and elitist and of trying to create a church within the church.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 1992
ROME -- In one of the most hotly debated acts of his papacy, Pope John Paul II beatified the Spanish founder of the conservative Opus Dei religious movement yesterday, elevating Monsignor Jose Maria Escriva de Balaguer to a status just short of sainthood, 17 years after his death.The crowd overflowing St. Peter's Square numbered more than 200,000 and was one of the biggest ever seen at the Vatican -- testimony to the reach and influence that inspire many liberal Catholics to label Opus Dei a sinister and powerful force for conservatism in the church and elsewhere.
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