Advertisement
HomeCollectionsOpus
IN THE NEWS

Opus

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
The easiest part of forming a string quartet may be finding four good musicians. Much trickier is finding players who can get along with one another, on- and offstage. Michael Hollinger's absorbing and often funny 2006 play "Opus," which has been given a taut production at the Olney Theatre Center, examines a fictional ensemble from the inside out. The Lazara Quartet is in crisis mode as the work opens. The original violist, Dorian, has been fired by the other members, and there isn't much time to regroup before a televised concert at the White House.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 10, 2013
An old reporter often begins his daily routine by turning to the newspaper's obituary page with mild trepidation, fearing another friend has gone to that great newsroom in the sky. So it was this week in reading of the death in Baltimore, at only 62, of Richard Ben Cramer, arguably the best writer of a presidential campaign chronicle ever. That would be his 1,047-page opus of one of the less memorable contests, in 1988, among six less-than-heroic candidates: Republicans George H.W. Bush, the eventual winner, and Bob Dole; and Democrats Michael Dukakis, the eventual party nominee, Richard Gephardt, Joe Biden and Gary Hart.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 21, 2003
You've seen him in the ads. The one with the "Who, me?" expression. Opus the Penguin returns Sunday to The Sun's Sunday comics pages in a new strip, Opus, but with little explanation for his whereabouts the past eight years. This called loudly for further investigation. Asked for comment, Bloom County, Outland and Opus creator Berkeley "Berke" Breathed declined all comment (mysterious), agreeing instead to arrange an interview - but only via e-mail - with his star (more mystery!). We didn't just want to chat with Opus, we were looking for answers to the tough questions, even if we ruffled a few feathers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
The witch had been weeping in the boxwoods for more than half a century before Laura Amy Schlitz picked up her pen and set her free. The 57-year-old Schlitz is the librarian at Park School and a Newbery Medal-winning author whose newest novel, "Splendors and Glooms," will be published Tuesday by Candlewick Press. But in 1959, she was a small child in the throes of a nightmare. "This book is a deeply personal story, and it goes back a very long way," she says. "When I was 4 years old, I woke up in the middle of the night and told my parents there was a witch crying outside in the boxwood bushes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2003
Next Sunday, Opus, the first regular comic strip from Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Berke Breathed in eight years, begins appearing each Sunday in The Sun's comics pages. Breathed was the creator of the much-loved Bloom County in the 1980s, and followed that strip with Outland, which was published until 1995. Opus features the penguin hero of the same name from both of those strips, now living with his mother back in Antarctica, trying to adjust to life as a penguin. We hope you enjoy this new addition to our comics lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003
It's no red herring. Or pickled, for that matter. Opus the cartoon penguin, chronicler of all that is true and right and aerodynamically incorrect, is returning from a self-imposed exile. Opus, the first regular comic strip from Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Berke Breathed in eight years, begins its Sundays-only run in The Sun Nov. 23. Breathed broke into newspapers with Bloom County in 1980, and won the Pulitzer for that pioneering strip in 1987. Bloom County was succeeded by Outland, which featured many of the same characters and was published until 1995.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | September 13, 2006
Near the end of Michael Hollinger's play Opus, a violist imagines the sound a magnificent string quartet can make: "Not a four-way compromise, but something greater than the sum of its parts." Hollinger's play, receiving a stirring area premiere at Everyman Theatre, is about a string quartet. But in more general terms, it's about artistic collaboration of any type -- the beautiful harmony that can result when the parts coalesce and the dissonance, disillusionment and even despair that can result when they don't.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 1, 1999
Pianist Helene Grimaud's program Saturday night in the Shriver Hall Concert Series was simple and without frills -- well-suited to her honest, direct and passionate pianism. Beethoven's late Sonatas in E major (opus 109) and A-flat major (opus 110) were followed after intermission by Brahms' early Sonata in F-sharp minor (opus 2). Although numbered second, Brahms' F-sharp minor Sonata is actually the first of the composer's three early piano sonatas. That it is the least familiar of those works must have something to do with its musical challenges: It is the most lavishly virtuosic and daringly rhapsodic of the three and the most difficult to hold together.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
The first building on the 400-acre research and development complex under development at Aberdeen Proving Ground has opened and is fully leased. Rockville-based Opus East, which is developing the Government and Technology Enterprise, or GATE, site in partnership with the Army, designed the $12 million structure to suit the needs of CACI International Inc., a technical consultant and federal contractor headquartered in Arlington, Va. The 60,000-square-foot structure...
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | February 10, 1995
Representatives of a Minneapolis-based development company unveiled plans last night for a Ellicott City shopping center that would include a grocery store, pharmacy and clothing stores."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
The easiest part of forming a string quartet may be finding four good musicians. Much trickier is finding players who can get along with one another, on- and offstage. Michael Hollinger's absorbing and often funny 2006 play "Opus," which has been given a taut production at the Olney Theatre Center, examines a fictional ensemble from the inside out. The Lazara Quartet is in crisis mode as the work opens. The original violist, Dorian, has been fired by the other members, and there isn't much time to regroup before a televised concert at the White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Debruge, Variety | May 5, 2011
Intriguing title aside, the mythical fire-breathers in "There Be Dragons" are strictly metaphorical. In both ambition and approach, "Dragons" echoes Roland Joffe's career-defining early work as he brings sweeping production values to overtly Christian subject matter, tracking the life of Opus Dei founder and modern-day Catholic saint Josemaria Escriva against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War. Overlong and unnecessarily burdened by...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Watching the Roller Derby movie "Whip It" is like spending roughly two hours with a frisky group of girls in a female empowerment camp. In the young-adult source book of the same name, the heroine, Bliss Cavendar, says in her first-person narration that "for the record, the roller-derby sisterhood is the real thing, not tainted by that fake you-go-girl, Oprah vibe you get from Noxzema commercials." She states she "really knows this" because "no one actually says 'you go, girl,' " - instead they say things like "you rock the house."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
The financially troubled developer of a huge business park being built at Aberdeen Proving Ground to serve base restructuring has backed out of the project and handed it off to Baltimore-based St. John Properties. Under plans approved by the Army, Rockville-based Opus East assigned development rights to St. John, which announced the agreement Tuesday and said it plans to start work on three or four research and office buildings. The 400-acre project, Government and Technology Enterprise, or GATE, is being developed as a 2 million- to 3 million-square-foot research and development park in partnership with the Army to handle growth from BRAC - military base restructuring.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
The first building on the 400-acre research and development complex under development at Aberdeen Proving Ground has opened and is fully leased. Rockville-based Opus East, which is developing the Government and Technology Enterprise, or GATE, site in partnership with the Army, designed the $12 million structure to suit the needs of CACI International Inc., a technical consultant and federal contractor headquartered in Arlington, Va. The 60,000-square-foot structure...
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | September 6, 2007
Cartoon lunacy has returned once again with the usual menu of outrage, effigy-burning, hurt feelings and apologies. As artists and literalists duke it out in the United States and in Europe, it no longer seems implausible that the world will go up in a mushroom cloud because some fevered fanatic couldn't take a joke. Or even get it. In Europe, it's the Swedes this time who have offended Muslims with cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, including one that shows the prophet's head on the body of a dog. Outrage was swift.
NEWS
By Berkeley Breathed | May 9, 2001
* Editor's note: A ragtag group of explorers discovers the truth behind the myth of a mysterious beast is nothing to sneeze at. Whispered legends tell of a race of razor-horned, slobbery-fanged beasts more ferocious than the others. Stories also say that a few of these brutes survived those terrible times. They say that just beyond our backyards, deep within the forest gloom, the very last one of them is still hiding, snarling, eating grizzly bears whole and waiting to be discovered. They call him the Last Basselope.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
The financially troubled developer of a huge business park being built at Aberdeen Proving Ground to serve base restructuring has backed out of the project and handed it off to Baltimore-based St. John Properties. Under plans approved by the Army, Rockville-based Opus East assigned development rights to St. John, which announced the agreement Tuesday and said it plans to start work on three or four research and office buildings. The 400-acre project, Government and Technology Enterprise, or GATE, is being developed as a 2 million- to 3 million-square-foot research and development park in partnership with the Army to handle growth from BRAC - military base restructuring.
FEATURES
September 16, 2006
Go See Half Nelson -- This is a portrait of the artist as a junior high history teacher and girls' basketball coach. He's also a coke addict. But the bond he shares with one of his student-players is a sign of life in a blighted urban landscape, and the performances of Ryan Gosling as the teacher and Shareeka Epps as the girl who befriends him will make you feel whole. Sun score: A-. The Black Dahlia -- Top cops Aaron Eckhart and Josh Hartnett try to solve the instantly infamous case of a would-be starlet whose murder seemed to sum up the sick soul of post-World War II L.A. Director Brian De Palma imbues the imagery with an obsessive grandeur even as the narrative falls apart.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | September 13, 2006
Near the end of Michael Hollinger's play Opus, a violist imagines the sound a magnificent string quartet can make: "Not a four-way compromise, but something greater than the sum of its parts." Hollinger's play, receiving a stirring area premiere at Everyman Theatre, is about a string quartet. But in more general terms, it's about artistic collaboration of any type -- the beautiful harmony that can result when the parts coalesce and the dissonance, disillusionment and even despair that can result when they don't.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.