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February 14, 2013
What did you expect after such an uplifting 2012 season? The Orioles clubhouse is full of players who think that they can go even farther into October this year if they can stay reasonably healthy for the duration. “I do," said catcher Matt Wieters. “One, we're getting a healthy Nick [Markakis] back and a healthy Nolan [Reimold] back. We're comfortable with all the guys we have in this clubhouse and just what we did last year and improving on it. The good thing is we do have a lot of guys back from last year and now if everybody takes a step forward, we're right where we want to be.” The big question, after a year that produced some highly unusual statistics - 29-9 in one-run games, 16 consecutive extra-inning victories - is whether that winning chemistry will carry over into 2013.
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NEWS
By Marc B. Terrill | September 22, 2014
Jews around the globe will gather in synagogues Wednesday to mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. There is a change in the air as fall approaches; schools are back in session, temperatures begin to drop and there is a general atmosphere of renewal. Jewish tradition encourages us to gather together, reflect on the year that has passed and pray for peace and sustenance in the coming year. The collective strength and spirit felt during this time of year typically energizes all to look ahead with optimism.
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NEWS
January 1, 2010
B y just about any measure, 2009 was a pretty lousy year. The hope for a fresh start that radiated from Washington during President Barack Obama's inauguration quickly soured into some of the deepest partisanship in memory. The financial meltdown of 2008 quickly morphed into highest-in-a-generation unemployment in 2009. Casualties spiked in Afghanistan as President Hamid Karzai emerged victorious from a blatantly fraudulent election that underscored the depth of corruption in his government.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
There's guarded optimism that Ravens veteran free safety Will Hill could potentially have his six-game suspension for violating the NFL substance-abuse policy reduced, according to sources. Under a revised drug policy that's been approved in balloting by the NFL Players Association player representatives that still requires NFL approval, the threshold for testing positive for marijuana has increased from 15 ng/m to 35 ng/m. That falls below the international standard of 150 ng/m used by the World Anti-Doping agency.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune Newspapers | June 14, 2011
The drumbeat of an NFL labor resolution grew louder Tuesday as rumblings of a deal -- or at least the framework of one -- could be reached within the next month. That would avert the disastrous possibility of games being canceled for the first time since 1987. The league and players continued their talks before a mediator Tuesday and Wednesday in an undisclosed location in Maryland, just outside of Washington, and signs are that the sides have gotten past the rhetoric and are gaining traction on real progress.
NEWS
By John Freeman and John Freeman,Special to the Sun | May 6, 2007
The Pesthouse By Jim Crace Nan A. Talese / 272 /pages / $24.95 Deep down, Jim Crace swears he's as sunny as the next fellow. He has a strange way of showing it. His 1999 novel, Being Dead, begins with the blunt-force trauma deaths of two main characters. Others feature wind-gouged landscapes, starvation, even the ravages of Christ's journey through the wilderness. The two-time Man Booker Prize finalist insists that these locales and topics don't reveal a dark spirit. It is simply where he finds his particular brand of bracing optimism.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 15, 2004
BOSTON -- I never dreamed that I would be feeling quite so cranky this early in the campaign season. Or that I would be driven from my usual sunny disposition to grumpiness by the Optimism Imperative. Have you noticed that the second most overused word in presidential politics -- right after "values" -- is optimism? Optimism is not just an attitude anymore, it's an entire political platform. It's as if both candidates were competing for Optimist in Chief. The whole thing began, as far as I can tell, in February, that dourest of months, when President Bush's campaign manager said: "We're moving into a phase where we will begin contrasting the president's positive, optimistic vision with the alternative."
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Business leaders are increasingly confident that the economy has shaken off recession and is entering a mild recovery, according to a new Conference Board survey to be announced today.The optimism of top corporate executives surged from January through early March, rebounding from a slide during the final three months of 1991, an index compiled by the New York-based business research center found."I think we're at a turning point right now," said Joseph W. Duncan, vice president and chief economist of Dun & Bradstreet, which issued a similar survey of business executives Wednesday.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 7, 2002
BERLIN -- If you think Germany is turning anti-American, pay attention to what happened here last month when the president visited Berlin. No, not President Bush -- President Clinton. Mr. Clinton, who helped unveil the refurbished Brandenburg Gate, was swarmed as Germans clamored to see, hear or shake hands with him. Elvis was in the house. If Mr. Bush visited Germany today there would also be street riots -- the sort they use tear gas to control. Why the difference? In fairness to Mr. Bush, it's partly because he had to order the bombing of Afghanistan, and may do the same in Iraq, and these are deeply controversial decisions on this increasingly pacifist continent.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
After three years of sporadic growth and rising optimism, Maryland retailers and service providers turned leery last month, as poor Easter sales raised fears that the economic recovery had ended.While the Maryland manufacturing sector continued to produce hopeful signs through April, service companies said their revenues fell last month, a survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va., reported yesterday.And service companies say they fear demand will keep dropping in the next six months.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
He remembered everything about that night. He remembered the song they slow danced to -- "You Are My Lady. " He remembered the play of the lights in her hair as he held her. He remembered her eyes as she looked up at him. He remembered wanting to spend the rest of his life with her. But it wasn't to be. Before they made it to forever, she died of cancer. So would Casey please play "You Are My Lady" in memory of that angel who was lost too soon? I may have rolled my eyes as I edited that listener's letter to be read on the air by Casey Kasem, who died on Father's Day at age 82 after suffering from dementia.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 3, 2014
It was one of those rare June days in Baltimore - warm and sunny, not yet hot and humid - so you could take a good, long walk through the city without shvitzing or getting terribly distressed. I mean, you could actually feel good about the place. There was a cooling breeze along North Charles, so nice you didn't even feel the after-burn from the buses and delivery trucks in the street. People were strolling, walking dogs, riding bikes, pushing skateboards or waiting for the Charm City Circulator to take them to the Inner Harbor.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
It's hard to overstate how bleak an outlook Maryland thoroughbred racing faced as recently as four years ago. Magna Entertainment Corp., which owned Pimlico Race Course and Laurel Park, had declared bankruptcy and squandered a chance to bring lucrative slot machines to its facilities. The General Assembly had in turn asserted its right to seize the tracks to protect the future of the Preakness Stakes, Maryland's largest sporting event. The state's breeding stock was in freefall.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 14, 2014
One chortles at Governor O'Maryland's response to Candy Crowley on CNN when she asked if he had been asleep at the switch during the development of this state's botched-and-still-botchy health insurance exchange. "Oh, no," the governor said. And I have to agree. It wasn't that Martin O'Malley was asleep at the switch. It's that he was in Israel or Brazil, or New Hampshire or Texas or South Carolina, or any of the many other places he visited during the last three years as a second-term governor and chair of the Democratic Governors Association, trying to make himself a viable presidential candidate.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
To view the latest measure of the state of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, the Chesapeake Bay Program's "Bay Barometer," is not unlike receiving the interim report card of a chronically underachieving student. Whatever modest progress is reported, it's difficult to get past the miserably low overall grades. This sort of science-based snapshot may be useful, but it's also a bit bracing - or "sobering" as some environmentalists have described it. Less than one-third of the Chesapeake Bay's tidal areas meet federally-approved water quality standards while three-quarters of 92 tidal areas tested positive for chemical contaminants, and underwater grasses continue to decline.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
How successful is Colonial Players' current production of "Annie?" Well, after the first weekend, available seats for this heart-warming family-friendly show were all but sold out — including a recently added matinee performance on Sunday, Dec. 8. All was not lost, though. Colonial Players noted that some standby seats were available, and the troupe's website noted that "we are very frequently able to seat several standby ticket holders for each performance. " Sold-out shows are rare in community theater, so why is this show — which opened 36 years ago on Broadway and has been seen numerous times by many of us — a 2013 sellout in Annapolis?
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 3, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose yesterday, led by technology and retail issues, amid optimism that consumers and businesses won't curtail their spending in the wake of higher interest rates.Better-than-expected earnings from ITT Corp. and Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., along with Boeing Co.'s move to trim costs by laying off more workers, also gave investors a reason to buy stocks."There's optimism about the corporate earnings picture, because the economy just seems poised to level off, not head down," said Thom Brown, managing director at Rutherford, Brown & Catherwood Inc. in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
Orioles manager Buck Showalter will take part in his second FanFest on Saturday, and he will be one of the first to say there's not as much buzz around the team's expectations as there was a year ago heading into the unofficial kickoff to the season. This time last year, the Orioles were coming off a 34-23 finish under Showalter. The team made moves that, while not flashy, were substantial, strengthening its lineup with the offseason acquisitions of shortstop J.J. Hardyand third baseman Mark Reynolds, and there was excitement to see how the club's stable of young, unproven pitchers would test in the American League East.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
The rebuilding project surrounding the Navy men's basketball team is in its third year under coach Ed DeChellis. And the hope this winter revolves around the return of all five starters from last season's squad. Junior forward Worth Smith (10.2 points and 5.4 rebounds per game), sophomore point guard Tilman Dunbar (9.5 points and 4.9 assists per game), junior guard Brandon Venturini (8.8 points per game) and senior guard Thurgood Wynn (3.9 points per game) are back. And sophomore center Will Kelly (2.7 points and 3.4 rebounds per game)
NEWS
By Ian Livingston and Michael O'Hanlon | October 13, 2013
Nearly two years have passed since the last U.S. combat troops associated with the war effort left Iraq. And on balance, it has been a very difficult two years, with a substantial increase in violence and much worse relations across Sunni-Shia lines than at any time since before the surge of 2007/2008. That said, there is reason for hope in Iraq - though it will require substantially better decision-making by Iraqi politicians than has been witnessed in the recent past. Three chief factors account for the reversals in Iraq.
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