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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
A controversial operation that offered hope to elderly patients robbed of sight by a "stroke" of the eye does not improve vision and may actually make it worse, an ophthalmologist with the University of Maryland is reporting today.Until other treatments are found, he said, better to leave the eye alone.Dr. Shalom Kelman, a UM eye surgeon who directed a nationwide study at 25 medical centers, said patients treated with surgery were less likely to improve and more likely to get worse than were people who received no treatment at all.The finding, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, prompted the National Eye Institute to issue a nationwide alert last month warning doctors to abandon the operation.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 31, 2008
Glaucoma, a disease of the optic nerve that, left untreated, can cause blindness, occurs in approximately 1 percent to 2 percent of the population over the age of 40, says Dr. Donald Abrams, chief of Sinai Hospital's Department of Ophthalmology based at the Krieger Eye Institute. However, in some populations, such as among African-Americans, the disease occurs more frequently; and in some age groups, it can occur in 6 percent to 10 percent of the population. But the disease often goes undiscovered - and untreated.
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FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 31, 2008
Glaucoma, a disease of the optic nerve that, left untreated, can cause blindness, occurs in approximately 1 percent to 2 percent of the population over the age of 40, says Dr. Donald Abrams, chief of Sinai Hospital's Department of Ophthalmology based at the Krieger Eye Institute. However, in some populations, such as among African-Americans, the disease occurs more frequently; and in some age groups, it can occur in 6 percent to 10 percent of the population. But the disease often goes undiscovered - and untreated.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Faller and Mary Beth Faller,STAMFORD ADVOCATE | April 8, 2001
Glaucoma is called the "thief of sight" because it can blind its victims painlessly and irreversibly. There are no symptoms until victims begin to lose their vision. Treatment can slow the progression of the disease but cannot reverse the damage. Eye doctors are worried about an impending increase in the number of glaucoma patients. Those at highest risk are people older than 60, African Americans older than 40, and those with a family history of the disease. "As our population ages, we have more people entering into the glaucoma age group," says Dr. Robert J. Fucigna, a Stamford, Conn.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1996
Favored Allied Forces received an ideal ride from Edgar Prado yesterday and drew off in the stretch to win the $75,000 Woodlawn Stakes by 3 1/2 lengths over Optic Nerve.The race probably did not produce any Preakness starters with the first two finishers being primed for the Jersey Derby at Garden State Park Memorial Day.Prado kept his mount in good position behind pacesetting Currency Arbitrage and Optic Nerve, then began seriously moving him at the eighth pole.Allied Forces responded well in his first start in since last July, pulling away from Optic Nerve to the wire.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
The National Eye Institute today warned that many Americans who are at high risk for glaucoma and diabetic eye diseases are not seeking adequate eye care, based on findings from a new national survey.Dr. James Mason, head of the U.S. Public Health Service, urged people at risk for glaucoma, especially blacks over age 40 and all people over 60, to have an eye examination through dilated pupils every two years.He also said that people with diabetes should undergo an eye examination through dilated pupils at least once a year.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1994
Q: My eye doctor has just started me on eye drops for glaucoma. He warned me that there can be some side effects, but I have forgotten what they are. It may not be a side effect, but putting the drops in my eyes twice a day is not a pleasant prospect. Can't I take some kind of pill instead?A: Glaucoma damages the optic nerve and leads to a progressive loss of vision if untreated. In most cases glaucoma is due to increased pressure within the eye (intraocular pressure or IOP). Glaucoma cannot be cured and prevention of optic nerve )
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
The optic nerves of American blacks may be more susceptible than those of whites to internal eye pressures associated with glaucoma, say the authors of a new Johns Hopkins study.The study identified a dramatic difference in the prevalence of the blinding disease in blacks.American blacks have the disease at a rate four to five times higher than whites, investigators at the Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology at the Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute saidtoday in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1990
Luzanne Lichtfuss received terrifying news from a neuro-ophthalmologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center.Lichtfuss, who wore glasses only when she drove, was told she was going blind in both eyes -- quickly. Her peripheral or side vision was slipping away; her central vision could begin to erode at any time; she had episodes of darkness in both eyes and excruciating headaches.The culprit was an excess amount of spinal fluid circulating in the brain, Dr. Shalom E. Kelman informed her. This leads to a high level of pressure in the brain and swelling of all its structures, especially the optic nerve, which causes the visual loss.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Faller and Mary Beth Faller,STAMFORD ADVOCATE | April 8, 2001
Glaucoma is called the "thief of sight" because it can blind its victims painlessly and irreversibly. There are no symptoms until victims begin to lose their vision. Treatment can slow the progression of the disease but cannot reverse the damage. Eye doctors are worried about an impending increase in the number of glaucoma patients. Those at highest risk are people older than 60, African Americans older than 40, and those with a family history of the disease. "As our population ages, we have more people entering into the glaucoma age group," says Dr. Robert J. Fucigna, a Stamford, Conn.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1996
Favored Allied Forces received an ideal ride from Edgar Prado yesterday and drew off in the stretch to win the $75,000 Woodlawn Stakes by 3 1/2 lengths over Optic Nerve.The race probably did not produce any Preakness starters with the first two finishers being primed for the Jersey Derby at Garden State Park Memorial Day.Prado kept his mount in good position behind pacesetting Currency Arbitrage and Optic Nerve, then began seriously moving him at the eighth pole.Allied Forces responded well in his first start in since last July, pulling away from Optic Nerve to the wire.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 22, 1995
A controversial operation that offered hope to elderly patients robbed of sight by a "stroke" of the eye does not improve vision and may actually make it worse, an ophthalmologist with the University of Maryland is reporting today.Until other treatments are found, he said, better to leave the eye alone.Dr. Shalom Kelman, a UM eye surgeon who directed a nationwide study at 25 medical centers, said patients treated with surgery were less likely to improve and more likely to get worse than were people who received no treatment at all.The finding, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, prompted the National Eye Institute to issue a nationwide alert last month warning doctors to abandon the operation.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1994
Q: My eye doctor has just started me on eye drops for glaucoma. He warned me that there can be some side effects, but I have forgotten what they are. It may not be a side effect, but putting the drops in my eyes twice a day is not a pleasant prospect. Can't I take some kind of pill instead?A: Glaucoma damages the optic nerve and leads to a progressive loss of vision if untreated. In most cases glaucoma is due to increased pressure within the eye (intraocular pressure or IOP). Glaucoma cannot be cured and prevention of optic nerve )
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
The National Eye Institute today warned that many Americans who are at high risk for glaucoma and diabetic eye diseases are not seeking adequate eye care, based on findings from a new national survey.Dr. James Mason, head of the U.S. Public Health Service, urged people at risk for glaucoma, especially blacks over age 40 and all people over 60, to have an eye examination through dilated pupils every two years.He also said that people with diabetes should undergo an eye examination through dilated pupils at least once a year.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
The optic nerves of American blacks may be more susceptible than those of whites to internal eye pressures associated with glaucoma, say the authors of a new Johns Hopkins study.The study identified a dramatic difference in the prevalence of the blinding disease in blacks.American blacks have the disease at a rate four to five times higher than whites, investigators at the Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology at the Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute saidtoday in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1990
Luzanne Lichtfuss received terrifying news from a neuro-ophthalmologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center.Lichtfuss, who wore glasses only when she drove, was told she was going blind in both eyes -- quickly. Her peripheral or side vision was slipping away; her central vision could begin to erode at any time; she had episodes of darkness in both eyes and excruciating headaches.The culprit was an excess amount of spinal fluid circulating in the brain, Dr. Shalom E. Kelman informed her. This leads to a high level of pressure in the brain and swelling of all its structures, especially the optic nerve, which causes the visual loss.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2005
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating reports that Viagra and two other drugs taken to combat erectile dysfunction might be linked to a disorder that causes partial or total blindness. The agency confirmed yesterday that it is working with Pfizer, the maker of Viagra, to update labeling to advise men of the rare occurrences. Meanwhile, Eli Lilly, the maker of Cialis, a newer anti-impotence drug, said yesterday that it had changed its label. All told, the FDA said it has received 43 reports of the disorder among men who had taken the drugs.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1996
The Woodlawn Stakes, which has a long history of producing Preakness starters, has drawn a field of 10 today at Pimlico Race Course.Allied Forces is the probable favorite in the $75,000 race for 3-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles on the turf.Owned by Ahmed Al Tayer, Allied Forces is one of three Triple Crown nominees in the field (Optic Nerve and Currency Arbitrage are the others).He was under consideration for today's Kentucky Derby, but his connections decided against running when he "got beat in a couple of mock races against older horses in Dubai," according to trainer Kiaran McLaughlin.
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