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By Karol V. Menzie | December 12, 1997
Susan Forsyth of Owings Mills was on the phone congratulating her younger sister, Mary Elliott of Timonium, for winning fourth place in Good Housekeeping magazine's gingerbread-house contest when her husband brought in the mail -- with a notice that Forsyth had won first place in the contest.Winning the contest -- announced in the magazine's December issue -- with her Victorian-style creation brought Forsyth a prize of $2,000 and a lot of media attention, including an appearance this past week on the Oprah Winfrey show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
In the new world of endless channels and multiple ways to watch TV, you almost never see as dramatic a change in viewing as the one unfolding in Baltimore this fall. After a year of speculation about how the end of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" would affect the fortunes of local stations, the October "sweeps" ratings period shows WJZ surpassing longtime ratings champ WBAL in the afternoon and early evening. Call it the aftereffect of the legendary Oprah Factor. Even if she hasn't yet found a way to translate her ratings magic to her new cable channel OWN, Winfrey still has an impact on local TV. Last October, WBAL, Baltimore's Hearst-owned NBC affiliate, was drawing 74,700 total viewers from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 3, 1991
JUST WONDERING:* Is a chance to sit in the audience of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" a big deal?If so, take note. The talk show diva (who ironically used to sometimes have trouble filling a studio audience when she was a beginner on "People Are Talking" on WJZ-Channel 13) is taping a show in Baltimore on June 19. And WMAR-Channel 2 is giving away 232 tickets to fill the audience.Winners will be selected by random drawing, and the specifications for entering seem as detailed as an aerospace contract.
MOBILE
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
May 18, 2011 Oprah Winfrey is one great storyteller. So let her set the stage for the story of her years in Baltimore - seven and a half years starting in 1976 that would profoundly shape not only the life of the young anchorwoman, but also give birth to the media phenomenon known as Oprah. "I came to Baltimore when I was 22 years old. Drove my red Cutlass up from Nashville, Tenn., arrived and was as close to 'The Beverly Hillbillies' as I could be," Winfrey says in that rich, inviting voice that millions have tuned in to for decades.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
Have you talked to your money lately?Olivia Mellan, a psychotherapist specializing in money matters, thinks you should.An imaginary conversation with money is one way that Mellan suggests people deal with one of the most highly charged, emotional parts of their lives. If people don't explore their feelings about money, the feelings can become a "source of underlying tension, overt hostility and chronic conflict," she said.In a speech sponsored by Jewish Family Services, Mellan explained the different ways that people relate to money and how they can come to terms with those feelings and the feelings of their spouses.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo and Elizabeth L. Piccirillo,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
When Lochearn resident Adrienne Watson Carver inquired about getting her 15 minutes of fame, the request was processed and approved in a fitting amount of time: 15 minutes. Carver e-mailed producers at The Oprah Winfrey Show hoping to be part of Oprah's Oscar Extravaganza, and was almost instantly gratified, receiving a flight to the Chicago studio and nothing less than the star treatment as she underwent a celebrity-style makeover. Her fabulous new look will be unveiled on today's show, which airs at 4 p.m. on WBAL, Channel 11. A former Baltimore Ravens cheerleader and owner of Studio A: Model, Etiquette and Dance Academy in Randallstown, Carver has had dreams of being an entertainer since childhood.
NEWS
By Sheri L. Parks | November 29, 2009
W e miss her already. When Oprah Winfrey announced that she would end her daily syndicated show in 2011 after 25 years, it was big news. According to her Web site, "The Oprah Winfrey Show" has been the No. 1 talk show for 23 consecutive seasons, seen by an estimated 42 million viewers a week in the United States and broadcast internationally in 134 countries. Access Hollywood called her "the most beloved woman in America," and she is routinely at the top of Forbes Magazine's most powerful media people.
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | November 29, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- As 1999 dawned, there was deep concern among civic leaders of this economically battered city.They feared the campaign to succeed Mayor Ed Rendell, forced to step down by term limits, would turn into a divisive, nasty TV-ad driven season, drenched in racial overtones.It didn't happen. Even though the winner, City Council President John Street is an African American, and the Republican businessman he barely defeated, Sam Katz, is white, the contest was remarkably free of negative attacks and tactics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
In the new world of endless channels and multiple ways to watch TV, you almost never see as dramatic a change in viewing as the one unfolding in Baltimore this fall. After a year of speculation about how the end of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" would affect the fortunes of local stations, the October "sweeps" ratings period shows WJZ surpassing longtime ratings champ WBAL in the afternoon and early evening. Call it the aftereffect of the legendary Oprah Factor. Even if she hasn't yet found a way to translate her ratings magic to her new cable channel OWN, Winfrey still has an impact on local TV. Last October, WBAL, Baltimore's Hearst-owned NBC affiliate, was drawing 74,700 total viewers from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1992
Folk singer James Taylor succinctly summed up the relationship between television and popular music in a recent issue of TV Guide: "The national life takes place on TV, and if you're not there, you're not in the national consciousness."Perhaps Mr. Taylor was overstating the medium's importance as a mirror of society and culture. But when it comes to selling pop records and promoting rock artists, television is a force second to none.In the rock 'n' roll era, popular taste has often been shaped by televised events: Elvis' censored hips, Mick Jagger's lascivious lips and the Beatles' mop tops on "The Ed Sullivan Show," and the gyrating teens on "American Bandstand," "Soul Train," "Hullabaloo" and "Shindig" embodied the energy and ubiquity of teen culture, the "it's-got-a-good-beat-and-you-can-dance-to-it" generation.
NEWS
By Sheri L. Parks | November 29, 2009
W e miss her already. When Oprah Winfrey announced that she would end her daily syndicated show in 2011 after 25 years, it was big news. According to her Web site, "The Oprah Winfrey Show" has been the No. 1 talk show for 23 consecutive seasons, seen by an estimated 42 million viewers a week in the United States and broadcast internationally in 134 countries. Access Hollywood called her "the most beloved woman in America," and she is routinely at the top of Forbes Magazine's most powerful media people.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander | September 20, 2004
Kelly Cook of Ellicott City went to Chicago to see Oprah and came home with a new car. On the season premiere of The Oprah Winfrey Show, which aired Sept. 13, Winfrey gave boxes to 276 unsuspecting audience members, telling them that one contained car keys. But, Cook said, even before she fully opened her box, people started waving keys. It turned out every guest would get a new Pontiac G6 as part of a promotion by General Motors Corp. "I was just floored," she said. The audience was taken outside to see hundreds of cars lined up in a lot beside the studio.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth L. Piccirillo and Elizabeth L. Piccirillo,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
When Lochearn resident Adrienne Watson Carver inquired about getting her 15 minutes of fame, the request was processed and approved in a fitting amount of time: 15 minutes. Carver e-mailed producers at The Oprah Winfrey Show hoping to be part of Oprah's Oscar Extravaganza, and was almost instantly gratified, receiving a flight to the Chicago studio and nothing less than the star treatment as she underwent a celebrity-style makeover. Her fabulous new look will be unveiled on today's show, which airs at 4 p.m. on WBAL, Channel 11. A former Baltimore Ravens cheerleader and owner of Studio A: Model, Etiquette and Dance Academy in Randallstown, Carver has had dreams of being an entertainer since childhood.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
Life is pretty good for Curtis Adamo. The Calvert Hall senior is working at a pharmacy, enjoying his final year of high school and planning for college. Quite a difference from the recent past. "I was diagnosed with depression when I was in the seventh grade," Adamo, 17, says. "I was sleeping a lot. I was reclusive. My grades were falling. I didn't eat very much. I had lack of energy, lack of motivation and spent a lot of time by myself." Since then, Adamo has gotten treatment and a mission: to get the word out to other teens that depression is nothing to be ashamed of, or denied; it's a medical condition that can be treated.
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | November 29, 1999
PHILADELPHIA -- As 1999 dawned, there was deep concern among civic leaders of this economically battered city.They feared the campaign to succeed Mayor Ed Rendell, forced to step down by term limits, would turn into a divisive, nasty TV-ad driven season, drenched in racial overtones.It didn't happen. Even though the winner, City Council President John Street is an African American, and the Republican businessman he barely defeated, Sam Katz, is white, the contest was remarkably free of negative attacks and tactics.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | December 12, 1997
Susan Forsyth of Owings Mills was on the phone congratulating her younger sister, Mary Elliott of Timonium, for winning fourth place in Good Housekeeping magazine's gingerbread-house contest when her husband brought in the mail -- with a notice that Forsyth had won first place in the contest.Winning the contest -- announced in the magazine's December issue -- with her Victorian-style creation brought Forsyth a prize of $2,000 and a lot of media attention, including an appearance this past week on the Oprah Winfrey show.
MOBILE
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
May 18, 2011 Oprah Winfrey is one great storyteller. So let her set the stage for the story of her years in Baltimore - seven and a half years starting in 1976 that would profoundly shape not only the life of the young anchorwoman, but also give birth to the media phenomenon known as Oprah. "I came to Baltimore when I was 22 years old. Drove my red Cutlass up from Nashville, Tenn., arrived and was as close to 'The Beverly Hillbillies' as I could be," Winfrey says in that rich, inviting voice that millions have tuned in to for decades.
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