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By LEONARD PITTS Jr | June 21, 1995
Miami. -- This is an open letter to young black America. People are asking me about you again. They're writing and calling, challenging me to explain why you sometimes call each other ''nigger,'' then profess anger and hurt when a white person uses the same word.They think you're hypocritical. They think you're hypersensitive. They think you should be more like the Italian guy who'll let a friend get away with the word ''wop'' or the Irish person who, in the spirit of good fun, now and then tolerates being called a ''mick.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
First The New York Times; now the Canton Kayak Club? The website for the group of urban paddling enthusiasts was the victim of an apparent hacking Wednesday and Thursday, bearing an image of a man on a horse with a spear and the messages "NO WAR!" and "All Hail the Islamic world, we're here!" "We have no idea who did it nor why someone would hack our site," c lub Vice President Cliff Charland said. "It is obviously something we're not happy about. " The website had been restored to normal as of 3:30 p.m. Thursday.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 25, 1993
It remains a haunting truth that out of the most abject of misery comes the most sublime of art. Thus it was that 400 years of oppression on this continent created the idiom known as jazz and thus it was in an island nation in the Caribbean that the same oppression created the idiom known as reggae.The best thing about "Stepping Razor -- Red X," a docu-biography of one of the original Wailers, Peter Tosh, is that it places him and the music at its truest source: the decrepit, violent and hopeless slums of Kingston, Jamaica.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The government of President Robert G. Mugabe in Zimbabwe was condemned this week in the strongest possible terms for a wave of violence against his political opponents that the U.N. Security Council declared has "made it impossible for a free and fair election to take place" this Friday. Mr. Mugabe's reign of terror has forced Morgan Tsvangirai, his would-be opponent in a runoff election for the Zimbabwean presidency, to withdraw and seek refuge in the Dutch Embassy. A defiant Mr. Mugabe says he plans to go forward with the election, regardless of the international outrage over his behavior.
NEWS
By Melissa Fletcher Stoeltje and Melissa Fletcher Stoeltje,SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | October 20, 2001
Since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, images have flowed out of the Middle East, scenes that depict fiery street protests, quiet prayer services or people just going about their day-to-day lives in the public sphere. After a while, something curious about these images emerges. There are no women in them. Ever. It's as if the other half of the population doesn't exist. When Al-Badr Al-Hazmi, the San Antonio radiologist who was first suspected and then cleared of complicity in the attacks, returned home after his detention, something equally curious happened, at least by Western standards.
NEWS
By Jared Taylor | February 4, 1994
PREDICTABLY, Colin Ferguson's killing of six commuters and wounding of 19 others on a Long Island train late last year has prompted speculation why he so resented whites that he killed them at random.The search for the causes of such crimes is welcome, but it is overdue. Although most Americans never hear about them, purely racial killings of whites by blacks are not that unusual.Earlier last year, Missy McLauchlin of Charleston, S.C., was abducted by blacks, gang-raped for several hours, shot and killed.
NEWS
By Shelby Steele | March 15, 1994
BRAVE though they were, A.M. Rosenthal's columns challenging black leaders to repudiate Louis Farrakhan for his (and his spokesman's) latest venture into anti-Semitism did not go far enough.Something much larger than Mr. Farrakhan must be repudiated, and many more of us than the black leadership must do the repudiating.Mr. Farrakhan personifies a specific territory in the collective imagination of black America. (Only this place in the imagination explains the vast disparity between his prominence and his rather small actual following.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | December 17, 1995
In this space last week, I suggested that literary theory is irrelevant, and ultimately poisonous, to the purposes and values of serious literature. Predictably, there was dissent. My position, I was instructed, was political and exposed my crass insensitivity to human oppression.By predisposition and by trade, I am on the side of the downtrodden, the oppressed. I toil in newspapers, have all my life. The noblest vocation of newspapers in America, it has been long and honorably established, is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 2005
A tug of war is under way inside black churches over who speaks for African-Americans and what role to play in politics, spurred by conservative black clergy who are looking to align themselves more closely with President Bush. The struggle, mainly among black Protestants, is taking place in pulpits, church conventions, on op-ed pages and on the airwaves, and the president himself began his second term with a meeting in the White House with black clergy and civic leaders who supported his re-election.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 4, 2013
Earlier this year, I saw a powerful play set in Zimbabwe in the 1890s (when it was called Rhodesia) that brought back some disturbing memories of my visit there about 15 years ago. "The Convert," the first in a trilogy being written by Zimbabwean award-winning playwright Danai Gurira, ran from mid-February to March 10 at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company. The play centered on Jekesai, a young girl from a rural village, who moved in with an aunt who worked for a Zimbabwean Catholic priest.
NEWS
April 2, 2012
There is a certain reliable pattern to each Maryland General Assembly session: The House and Senate will be at odds, 90 days worth of legislating will be condensed to about three weeks, and most bills of substance will be deferred or delayed. It's also predictable that at some point, local governments will groan and moan about how state government is usurping their authority. Well, with less than a week left in the session, it's that time of year again. Local leaders from Western Maryland to the Eastern Shore see Annapolis trampling local decision-making rights from land planning to government ethics, and they don't much like it. At some level, it's understandable that county executives, commissioners and council members want to make their choices unencumbered by state and federal mandates.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Catholics have it backward: Every god is made in the likeness of man. My mom created me (there is evidence for this). I have to object to "God's beautiful design," as we are a beautiful product of non-random selection. Sure, the church is making progress. It used to burn women and now it only suppresses them. Our self-made design is to attempt intercourse wherever and whenever we can, and our kids should be doing this vaccinated and with readily-available contraception. In this secular society, no one wears a scarlet letter for reproducing before marriage or being attracted to the same sex. Same-sex couples have a right to their sexuality in a free society.
SPORTS
By Steven Goff, The Washington Post | August 17, 2011
The women's pro soccer team in South Florida employs several of the U.S. stars from this summer's World Cup, including Abby Wambach and Hope Solo, but the figure who has drawn much of the attention this season has been its owner, Dan Borislow. As magicJack - which is named after Borislow's broadband telephone device - enters the Women's Professional Soccer playoffs this week, a cloud of contentiousness and uncertainty hovers over the club. The team was formerly known as the Washington Freedom before the 49-year-old entrepreneur purchased it from Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks last fall and moved it from Maryland SoccerPlex in Montgomery County to near his Palm Beach home.
NEWS
By Taraneh Ghajar Jerven | June 7, 2010
There's a misguided race to ban the face-veil in Europe, and France is taking the lead. On May 19, the French cabinet approved legislation to ban women in France from wearing full Islamic face-coverings, the burqa and niqab, in public areas. France, which contains Europe's largest Muslim population, has been headed in this direction for a while. In 2004, the government banned students and staff from wearing veils in schools. At that time, the rationale was French secularism.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea K. Walker | March 21, 2010
L ynda Siggers of Glen Burnie had fallen behind on her credit-card bill when the Mann Bracken law firm threatened to garnish roughly one-sixth of her monthly wages as a day-care worker. She panicked and said she called the firm to plead her case, agreeing to scrape together $100 as a good-faith payment after a firm representative indicated that might be enough to have the garnishment lifted. But soon after that December call, Mann Bracken had $154 docked from her paycheck anyway. She was forced to turn to her church for help paying rent.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 23, 2002
SO IN THE blink of an eye, the mouths of black America's liberal leadership have clamped shut tighter than the doors on Mumia Abu-Jamal's cell on death row. For a while there, we couldn't seem to shut them up. We had the Revvums Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton getting offended and criticizing jokes disparaging Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks in the movie Barbershop. Then we had Harry Belafonte -- a left-wing activist as well as a singer and actor -- dismissing Secretary of State Colin Powell as President Bush's house slave.
NEWS
January 20, 2003
Today is a national holiday in celebration of the life and work of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who was born in Atlanta on Jan. 15, 1929, and assassinated in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968, while trying to help striking garbage workers. King rose to prominence in 1955, when he was pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala. On Dec. 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat for a white passenger and go to the back of the bus. King emerged as one of the leaders of the bus boycott that ensued.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | September 21, 2009
The list of sins against women in the United States is long. We still badly lag our male counterparts in pay. We just about outnumber men in college but are only a fraction of the bosses in business. We just about outnumber men in law school, too. But there are only two women on the Supreme Court. We work outside the home but still handle most of the chores in it. We are in regular danger of having our reproductive rights revoked. Our daughters are muscled out of the way in science classes.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The government of President Robert G. Mugabe in Zimbabwe was condemned this week in the strongest possible terms for a wave of violence against his political opponents that the U.N. Security Council declared has "made it impossible for a free and fair election to take place" this Friday. Mr. Mugabe's reign of terror has forced Morgan Tsvangirai, his would-be opponent in a runoff election for the Zimbabwean presidency, to withdraw and seek refuge in the Dutch Embassy. A defiant Mr. Mugabe says he plans to go forward with the election, regardless of the international outrage over his behavior.
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