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By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | September 2, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- In yet another stunning turnaround, Mexico's ruling party helped elect an opposition-party member as interim governor of Guanajuato, a key central state torn by election fraud.The election by the state legislature late Saturday opens the way for the center-right National Action Party (PAN) to capture the governorship in a special election next year. If the PAN captures the governorship, it would be only the second time an opposition party has occupied a state house since 1929.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 16, 2014
Every two-term president since the 22nd Amendment was ratified in 1951 has faced being a lame-duck upon his re-election. Barack Obama clearly is no exception. With approximately 28 months left in his presidency, the clock is running out as he seeks to achieve a favorable legacy. Unless Mr. Obama's party defies the odds and retains control of the Senate and recaptures the House in the November elections, the outlook seems dim to reverse the Republican obstructionism that has hobbled most of his White House tenure.
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NEWS
June 9, 1997
PRESIDENT Liamine Zeroual's idea was that a parliamentary election in Algeria would confer credibility on his regime and repudiate the Islamic extremists whose civil war has taken 60,000 lives in five years. More than two-thirds of eligible Algerians turned out last Thursday in a demonstration for legitimacy and against terror.The party winning the most seats in the National Assembly was the National Democratic Rally, which President Zeroual created as an afterthought to sever his connection from the National Liberation Front (NLF)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 28, 2014
In the already tiresome guessing game of whether or not Hillary Clinton will run for president in 2016, there's a wide assumption among Democrats that the nomination is hers for the asking. One apparent rationale is that the party has no one else to turn to who has comparable national recognition or appeal. The assumption is somewhat predicated on an expectation that Vice President Joe Biden would step aside, either out of a conviction that he could not beat her in primary competition or that his public image is so tattered as to render his nomination inconceivable.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Ten days after Zimbabwe voted and by most accounts rejected its long-serving, autocratic president, the mood of the country grew more ominous yesterday. The opposition reported widespread attacks on its supporters, black youths drove white farmers off their land and elections officials were arrested on charges of vote tampering. As President Robert G. Mugabe sought to cling to power beyond his 28th year in office, Zimbabwe's High Court began to weigh the opposition Movement for Democratic Change's demand for the immediate release of the presidential election results.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- The most serious rioting in decades erupted yesterday in downtown Jakarta, with anti-government protesters hurling rocks and setting fire to buses, cars and several office buildings, then fleeing wildly as police and soldiers charged at them with bamboo canes.The rapid spread of the rioting and the anger of the people in the streets seemed to take authorities by surprise and raised questions about the government's ability to control popular protest as the country enters a contentious pre-election period.
TOPIC
By THE NATION | November 17, 2002
THE PRESIDENT, let's understand, won a historic victory by committing politics --shrewd, aggressive, old-fashioned, take-no-prisoners politics -- while the opposition party did the opposite. That is why Republicans reclaimed control of the Senate and added to their House majority. They are in a position to do real damage with long-term consequences for the republic, from gutting the federal tax code to packing the Supreme Court with more right-wingers, advancing an agenda that we continue to believe Americans at large neither want nor support.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 1997
NEZAHUALCOYOTL, Mexico -- When Valentin Gonzalez took office as mayor of this suburb of Mexico City in January, he found 120 reporters on the city payroll. Former mayors were renting buildings to the city at exorbitant rates. The water system hadn't been repaired in 25 years.His experience is typical of what the growing number of opposition party mayors have encountered as they try to reform cities that have been run for years on graft and back-room deals.In Tuxtla Gutierrez, in the southern state of Chiapas, Mayor Enoch Araujo of the center-right National Action Party (PAN)
NEWS
October 20, 2011
The Democrats in Annapolis, it seems, are trying to draw congressional district lines to their advantage. Gee whiz. Can't you imagine the controlling political party saying, "I think we should be very nice this time around and give the opposition party the advantage while redrawing districts"? Roger L. Kegley, Abingdon
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 1, 2003
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Opponents of Zimbabwe President Robert G. Mugabe apparently sealed their political control over Harare in weekend parliamentary elections, but the triumph was marred yesterday by the arrest of an opposition leader. Gibson Sibanda, vice president of the Movement for Democratic Change, the nation's main opposition party, was arrested in his hometown of Bulawayo as security forces increased their patrols of the capital's main boulevards and around Mugabe's home.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 3, 2014
As President Obama greets the new year amid the balmy breezes of Hawaii, he must brace himself for the stiff winds that await him back here in the nation's dysfunctional capital. Desperate to accentuate the positive, his political strategists back on the mainland have heralded the news that more than a million Americans have signed up for insurance through federal and state exchanges under the auspices of his troubled Affordable Care Act, far short of earlier expectations that 3 million would have done so by now. Dampening down administration pleasure that a budget compromise was reached through the rare bipartisan teamwork of Republican Paul Ryan in the House and Democrat Patty Murray in the Senate, the opposition party has renewed and sustained its pushback against Obamacare.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 6, 2013
In President Barack Obama's running argument with the Republicans in Congress over who's responsible for the legislative stalemate on Capitol Hill, he suffers self-inflicted wounds by continuing to run up the same white flag that undermined his own efforts in his first term. He did it again in his embarrassing cave-in to Congress' makeshift response to the air traffic controllers' furloughs that briefly stalled travel, acquiescing in shifting $253 million in Federal Aviation Administration funds to keep them on the job. In so doing, he invited allegations of crumbling to legislators more concerned about getting to and from their districts than solving the fiscal sequester nightmare paralyzing the government.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 9, 2013
The musical "Annie" is enjoying another revival on Broadway. The show opened during the Carter administration, when America was in need of some optimism. "The sun'll come out tomorrow," sang Annie, and with the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980, for a while, it did. Now we're back in "Hooverville," the name given to shantytowns that popped up during the Great Depression. It isn't that bad yet, though the Obama administration is forecasting gloom and doom if Republicans don't cave on another tax increase.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Rep. Nancy Pelosi has returned as the Democratic House minority leader. While I can't speak to the internal operation of the Democratic caucus, I can speak to the public persona that Ms. Pelosi presents, and it is not good. When speaker of the House, her disheveled leadership on health reform took far too long for the Democrats to develop a unified position on an issue that had been around since my high school debate topics in the 1960s. At President Obama's first State of the Union address, Mrs. Pelosi was like a Jack-in-the-Box jumping up at every occasion.
NEWS
October 20, 2011
The Democrats in Annapolis, it seems, are trying to draw congressional district lines to their advantage. Gee whiz. Can't you imagine the controlling political party saying, "I think we should be very nice this time around and give the opposition party the advantage while redrawing districts"? Roger L. Kegley, Abingdon
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 7, 2010
One of the first political themes of the new year is the speculation that President Barack Obama, after less than a year in office, is already on the skids, and that his Democratic Party is doomed to major defeats in November's congressional elections. Such talk is widely heard despite the fact that it has also been less than a year since arguably one of American history's worst presidents left office, leaving in his wake two wars - one of which he unnecessarily started - and the worst economic meltdown since the Great Depression.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2000
MUTOKO, Zimbabwe - In 1975, at age 17, Maxwell Hodzi left his family in this rural mountain village eager to fight alongside Robert Mugabe in a liberation war against white rule. Now, some 20 years after victory, as his country teeters on the brink of economic ruin, Hodzi appears ready to go to battle again for his president and former commander. Wearing a black beret, Hodzi led a group of teen-agers in Mugabe T-shirts down the potholed streets of his hometown over the weekend hoping to develop a new generation of ruling party members.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Zimbabwe's leading opposition party declared yesterday that it would suspend its participation in parliamentary and local elections because the ruling ZANU-PF party, led by President Robert G. Mugabe, has effectively eliminated any chance of a fair vote. Leaders of the opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change, said they would take part in the voting only if Mugabe's government adopted political reforms, including establishing an independent authority to oversee the voting.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2008
Johannesburg, South Africa -- Nyasha Putana could not help crying in pain as ruling party supporters used sticks to whack his buttocks and soles of his feet in front of hundreds of fellow villagers. At least five people died from beatings at Monday's "political meeting" at Dakudzwa village, about 60 miles north of Harare, in Mashonaland, according to witnesses, the opposition Movement for Democratic Change and a human rights worker who requested anonymity for fear of reprisals. "They were saying, `We are saving the country by pain,'" said Putana, 32, speaking softly from his hospital bed in Harare yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's government quickly distanced itself from an editorial in the state-run newspaper yesterday that called for a transitional unity government headed by the country's longtime strongman, Robert G. Mugabe, until new elections could be organized. Zimbabwe has been plunged into political crisis since its disputed elections last month, with the government refusing to announce who won the race for president. Still, the ruling party has repeatedly argued that neither Mugabe nor his chief rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, won a majority of the votes, forcing the two into a runoff.
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