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By Daniel Meltzer | March 26, 2003
BRITISH PRIME Minister Tony Blair "brought down the house" (of Commons) a few of weeks ago when he was asked what other nation, besides Britain and the United States, supports an invasion of Iraq. "Poland," he replied. The laughter in the chamber took nearly a full minute to subside as he looked about him with an expression of, well, shock and awe. Backing from the Poles for the war against Iraq is credible, if of questionable value. The polls are another matter. Americans would do well to doubt the degree of citizen support for the war being reported here.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A breathless article by Rebekah Metzler at USNews.com informs us that Sen. Mitch McConnell is in trouble in my native state because "his Democratic opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, leads him in his 2014 re-election race, according to a new poll. " Though this may make the hearts of Kentucky Democrats go pitty-pat, once you look past the opening paragraph the whole thing evaporates. Ms. Grimes's exciting lead, it turns out, is one percentage point, 45 percent to 44 percent.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It is probably safe to say that President Clinton would not have held his prime-time news conference the other night if there had not been public opinion polls showing that his approval rating had dropped below 50 percent in the last few weeks. These days, almost every political decision is dictated, at least in part, by polls.Indeed, it is fair to say that both the politicians and the press have become captives of the polling data. The president had no sooner ended his news conference than the question became, "How did it play?"
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | April 14, 2008
In a now-famous recent exchange on Good Morning America, ABC reporter Martha Raddatz asked Vice President Dick Cheney about the fact that "two-thirds of the American people say [the war in Iraq] is not worth fighting." The vice president said, "So?" and Ms. Raddatz asked, "So you don't care what the American people think?" Mr. Cheney responded that "you cannot be blown off course by the fluctuations in the public opinion polls." Six days later, Mr. Cheney reasserted that his answer was about "polls," adding, "The point I wanted to make, and I would make again ... is the president of the United States ... can't make decisions based on public opinion polls.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- No one should be surprised at the disclosure by two political scientists that Richard Nixon conducted extensive and covertly funded public opinion polling while he was in the White House.What makes the story intriguing, however, is the discovery that Nixon kept the results secret even from many of his own political advisers. That was vintage Nixon, a politician who always kept his cards close to his vest.It was also probably characteristic of Nixon that he would rely so heavily on polls while publicly disdaining them.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As Speaker Newt Gingrich & Co. drive toward the end of the 100 days in which they've pledged to get House action on their "Contract with America," they diligently strive for the impression that they are merely riding on a great wave of voter support for their objectives.But only a few weeks ago, a New York Times/CBS News poll reported that most voters surveyed disagreed with some basic tenets of the contract. They favored, for example, putting a higher premium on reducing the deficit than on cutting taxes, TC centerpiece of the document.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 24, 1997
LONDON -- Life is tough for Britain's political pollsters.Five years ago, they trumpeted a Labor victory only to find the Conservatives pulling away for a fourth-straight election triumph.Now, the pollsters are again on the hot seat after election surveys with wildly different numbers were published yesterday.The ICM poll for the Guardian of London showed Labor's lead shrinking to 5 points over the Conservatives, 42 percent to 37 percent, with 14 percent for the Liberal Democrats. Only a week earlier, ICM showed Labor with a 14-point advantage.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | April 14, 2008
In a now-famous recent exchange on Good Morning America, ABC reporter Martha Raddatz asked Vice President Dick Cheney about the fact that "two-thirds of the American people say [the war in Iraq] is not worth fighting." The vice president said, "So?" and Ms. Raddatz asked, "So you don't care what the American people think?" Mr. Cheney responded that "you cannot be blown off course by the fluctuations in the public opinion polls." Six days later, Mr. Cheney reasserted that his answer was about "polls," adding, "The point I wanted to make, and I would make again ... is the president of the United States ... can't make decisions based on public opinion polls.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 2001
LIMA, Peru - With polls showing a tightening race and many voters disillusioned or undecided, Peru's presidential election today may yield no clear winner but another difficult challenge for the country's young democracy, international observers say. The election is the second for president in the 13 months after the collapse of President Alberto K. Fujimori's government and an intelligence network that throttled democracy through vote fraud, manipulation of...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
LONDON -- In what the opposition called the "biggest climb-down in modern political history," the British government retreated yesterday from the unpopular poll tax and announced a major switch from local to central funding of services.The move shifted the cost of $8 billion worth of services previously financed by local communities to the central government. This will lower the average cost of the local poll, or head, tax by $250 per person.To enable the central government to cover the tab, Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont announced an increase in the value-added tax (VAT)
NEWS
By Steven Kull | April 1, 2008
In a recent interview with Vice President Dick Cheney, ABC News correspondent Martha Raddatz presented polling data showing that most Americans are critical of the Iraq war. Mr. Cheney responded, cryptically, "So?" Ms. Raddatz then asked, "So - you don't care what the American people think?" Mr. Cheney replied, "No," explaining, "I think you cannot be blown off course by the fluctuations in the public opinion polls." Subsequently, White House spokeswoman Dana Perino, fielding questions about Mr. Cheney's comments, was asked whether the public should have "input" on decisions about Iraq.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | May 3, 2007
Sometimes it seems as if everybody is trying to rip off his own little piece of America, until we are all torn apart. A reader writes: "Liberals hold us individually responsible for nothing but collectively responsible for everything." The last time I saw a Republican express outrage was 1991, when Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas told the senators what he thought of the smear tactics used against him. Before that, it was Ronald Reagan saying, "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
A majority of county residents support a mixture of tax increases and cost cuts to tackle looming budget challenges, yet about the same number don't trust the local government to strike the right balance, according to a new Anne Arundel Community College survey. Fifty percent of the 529 residents polled two weeks ago also said they supported a school system that is of "absolute top quality regardless of the cost." Only a quarter, however, supported raising taxes to pay for the $133 million increase in education spending proposed by Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - The long war over judicial nominations comes to a head in the Senate this week, but opinion polls show that outside the Beltway, the focus is on issues much closer to home. The disconnect seems to be souring many Americans on the people they sent here to represent them. "The big theme of public opinion about Congress this year has been that they're not really addressing the issues that people really care about, and that goes for both parties," said Carroll Doherty, director of research at the Pew Research Center for People and the Press, which released a poll last week showing poor approval ratings for lawmakers in both parties.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gail Gibson and Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - After rushing headlong into the emotional fray over the life of a brain-damaged Florida woman just a week ago, political leaders reacted to the apparent end of the wrenching saga with another near-unanimous position - silence. For Republicans who led the frenzied effort to help prolong the life of Terri Schiavo, there was good reason by week's end to quietly pull back. Their actions had been slapped down by the courts and scorned by the public, and new opinion polls showed slipping approval rates for Congress and the president.
NEWS
By Maria L. La Ganga and Maria L. La Ganga,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 2004
LAS VEGAS - Sen. John Kerry said yesterday that the Bush administration has been "shortchanging" members of the National Guard, many of whom have been killed or wounded alongside active-duty troops in Iraq. Speaking yesterday at the National Guard's annual convention, the Massachusetts Democrat delivered perhaps his sharpest critique to date of President Bush's leadership and the war in Iraq. Kerry pledged to improve health coverage, training and equipment for the tens of thousands of Guard members who have been pressed into full-time duty because of the conflict.
NEWS
By Steven Kull | April 1, 2008
In a recent interview with Vice President Dick Cheney, ABC News correspondent Martha Raddatz presented polling data showing that most Americans are critical of the Iraq war. Mr. Cheney responded, cryptically, "So?" Ms. Raddatz then asked, "So - you don't care what the American people think?" Mr. Cheney replied, "No," explaining, "I think you cannot be blown off course by the fluctuations in the public opinion polls." Subsequently, White House spokeswoman Dana Perino, fielding questions about Mr. Cheney's comments, was asked whether the public should have "input" on decisions about Iraq.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A breathless article by Rebekah Metzler at USNews.com informs us that Sen. Mitch McConnell is in trouble in my native state because "his Democratic opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, leads him in his 2014 re-election race, according to a new poll. " Though this may make the hearts of Kentucky Democrats go pitty-pat, once you look past the opening paragraph the whole thing evaporates. Ms. Grimes's exciting lead, it turns out, is one percentage point, 45 percent to 44 percent.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2004
JERUSALEM - With opinion polls indicating for the first time that his Gaza withdrawal plan would be rejected by his Likud Party, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon scrambled yesterday to shore up support for the proposal, portraying a coming party referendum on the plan as a vote of confidence in him. In radio and newspaper interviews, Sharon predicted victory and warned that a defeat in the referendum Sunday would bring down the Likud-led government and...
NEWS
By Paul West and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Paul West and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush's standing with voters hasn't been significantly hurt by a weeklong barrage of criticism over his anti-terrorism policies before Sept. 11, 2001, according to two new opinion surveys. The public polls, completed over the weekend, show that Bush has erased Sen. John Kerry's earlier advantage in a head-to-match, despite the contentious debate over whether the Bush administration did enough to prevent the terrorist attacks. That upswing for Bush might help explain why the White House has so far been willing to ride out the storm over National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice's refusal to testify publicly before the Sept.
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