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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
LITTLE DO THE squirmy kindergartners realize that the silver-haired woman among them in the main Enoch Pratt Free Library knows them well. "Please," Iona Opie asks librarian and storyteller Selma Levi, "I haven't got a blue and a green." Levi tears bits of blue and green crepe paper from her own streamers, hands them to Opie and proceeds with Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are."When the children, fired up by Levi's telling of the tale, roar, gnash their teeth and wave their streamers in the wild rumpus that ensues, so does Opie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
The forthcoming Belvedere Square restaurant from Woodberry Kitchen owner Spike Gjerde has a name: Shoo-Fly . First announced in May, the "farmhouse diner" is being readied for a mid-September opening in the free-standing building that was formerly Crush, according to Gjerde. Shoo-Fly will share its 5,000-square-foot space with Gjerde's burgeoning canning and preservation operations, which are currently housed at Woodberry Kitchen . Details of the opening and operations were confirmed by Patrick "Opie" Crooks , who has been hired as the new restaurant's chef de cuisine.
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NEWS
May 14, 2004
Hume Opie Annan Jr., a retired vice president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, died of cancer May 7 at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland. He was 77 and a resident of Fort Ashby, W.Va., and formerly lived in Loch Raven Village. He was born in Tampa, Fla., and raised in Cumberland, and he worked his studies at Princeton University around merchant marine service in World War II. He graduated from the school in 1949 and was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa honors fraternity. After serving in the Army from 1950 to 1952, he moved to Baltimore and became vice president of corporate planning and research for Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
SPORTS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Buck Showalter means business. As manager of the Orioles, Showalter has brought a shot of mojo to a moribund baseball team, thanks in no small part to his grim determination to win. In photos, his facial expressions usually range from "quasi-stern" to "full-on scowl. " But Showalter, 56, does have a soft side for Sader, Webster, Jasper and Opie - four floppy-eared basset hounds he and his wife, Angela, shuttle between their countryside home in northern Baltimore County and their off-season house in Texas.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | August 18, 2008
Katherin Marie Sullivan Opie Johnson, a longtime Essex resident who tended bar well into her 60s, died Friday at a nursing home in Martinsburg, W.Va. She was 82. Katherin Marie Sullivan was born in Baltimore to Irish immigrant parents. She was an only child and grew up on Ashland Avenue. As a young girl, she got 25 cents from her neighbors to wash their front steps - her first job. After she graduated from high school, she met Clyde Nesbit Opie at a downtown Baltimore lounge. She married Mr. Opie, who was a maintenance worker for airplane manufacturer Martin Marietta in Middle River, when she was 25. The two had six children, three boys and three girls, before they divorced.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2004
On the night seven years ago that Mark Waddell was first presented to the congregation at Catonsville United Methodist Church, a few members took their new pastor out to Tastee Zone for snowballs and ice cream. Tastee Zone has a fiercely loyal following, so it was not surprising to find Waddell and his daughter, Haley, there again last week, enjoying a caramel sundae. "The caramel here tastes like caramel," he says. "The caramel at Opie's tastes like butterscotch." In Catonsville, a town divided by snowball stands, there are two kinds of people: Opie's people and Tastee Zone people, and Waddell has just identified himself as one of the latter.
SPORTS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Buck Showalter means business. As manager of the Orioles, Showalter has brought a shot of mojo to a moribund baseball team, thanks in no small part to his grim determination to win. In photos, his facial expressions usually range from "quasi-stern" to "full-on scowl. " But Showalter, 56, does have a soft side for Sader, Webster, Jasper and Opie - four floppy-eared basset hounds he and his wife, Angela, shuttle between their countryside home in northern Baltimore County and their off-season house in Texas.
FEATURES
By David Hinckley and David Hinckley,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | August 10, 2004
NEW YORK - Radio bad boys Opie and Anthony are coming back, and they just might be badder than ever. This time, however, they do come at a price for listeners. Starting Oct. 4, the former syndicated afternoon hosts will do a four-hour show each morning on XM Satellite Radio, where there are almost no content restrictions and which is creating a premium channel just for Gregg (Opie) Hughes and Anthony Cumia. That means fans have to buy an XM radio, pay the regular $9.99 monthly subscription fee and then pay an additional $1.99 per month for the new channel, which will start with just Opie and Anthony before it adds other programming.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | December 17, 1996
Hey, if you wish big, mean Baltimore could be just a little like small, friendly Mayberry, N.C., this gift's for you. "Say 'Hey' to these Happy Mayberry Accessories!," offered this holiday season Hawthorne Village sculptures, maker of those ubiquitous Christmas villages. "Bring your Mayberry town to life!" Hark, do tell us more! The $21.90 "Have a Great Day" set, for example, features Opie dashing to school and Aunt Bee in her Sunday best, headin' for church -- a sweet, timeless TV image captured in handcrafted pewter figurines.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 22, 1992
The only thing wrong with "Far and Away" is that it's near and close.A somewhat simple-minded, overwrought mock epic, it ought to get poor David Lean spinning in his grave. Imagine an Irish "Dr. HD as directed by Opie and you've got it.It was directed by Opie -- by the grown-up Ron Howard, that is -- and his worst move is to give the movie a lush, sprawling visual vocabulary. It has more helicopter shots than an air assault in Vietnam 20 years back, and when the camera in an opening sequence climbs a craggy spume---ed cliff, ascends a steep though emerald hill in the blazing sunshine to find a shanty Irish farmstead rusticating at a 90-degree angle in poverty so picturesque it could be a theme park in Orlando called Poorland, you know exactly where you are: in a movie.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 8, 2012
MAYBERRY, N.C. -- Former sheriff Andy Taylor died here last week. Mayberry is in mourning. Sheriff Taylor was one of the last links to another, simpler time. Before there was a traffic light or drive-through banking here, before we got our first cellphone tower or Wi-Fi connection, before the Dairy Queen, the Wal-Mart and the Subway were built out on Route 89, before color was invented, back when people still appeared to one another in shades of black and white, Mayberry was a very different town in a very different America.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | August 18, 2008
Katherin Marie Sullivan Opie Johnson, a longtime Essex resident who tended bar well into her 60s, died Friday at a nursing home in Martinsburg, W.Va. She was 82. Katherin Marie Sullivan was born in Baltimore to Irish immigrant parents. She was an only child and grew up on Ashland Avenue. As a young girl, she got 25 cents from her neighbors to wash their front steps - her first job. After she graduated from high school, she met Clyde Nesbit Opie at a downtown Baltimore lounge. She married Mr. Opie, who was a maintenance worker for airplane manufacturer Martin Marietta in Middle River, when she was 25. The two had six children, three boys and three girls, before they divorced.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
It's been four months since Howard Stern, the self-proclaimed King of All Media, abandoned terrestrial radio, but the personalities who sought to fill his shoes are still struggling to find their footing. Audience ratings released last week for the first three months of the year show dismal numbers for most of Stern's successors in morning drive-time on terrestrial radio. One, the former rock singer David Lee Roth, who never took to his new gig and admitted as much on the air, was fired, and replaced last week in seven major markets -- including New York, Boston and Philadelphia -- by a duo more in tune with Stern's shock-jock persona, Opie and Anthony.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2004
On the night seven years ago that Mark Waddell was first presented to the congregation at Catonsville United Methodist Church, a few members took their new pastor out to Tastee Zone for snowballs and ice cream. Tastee Zone has a fiercely loyal following, so it was not surprising to find Waddell and his daughter, Haley, there again last week, enjoying a caramel sundae. "The caramel here tastes like caramel," he says. "The caramel at Opie's tastes like butterscotch." In Catonsville, a town divided by snowball stands, there are two kinds of people: Opie's people and Tastee Zone people, and Waddell has just identified himself as one of the latter.
FEATURES
By David Hinckley and David Hinckley,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | August 10, 2004
NEW YORK - Radio bad boys Opie and Anthony are coming back, and they just might be badder than ever. This time, however, they do come at a price for listeners. Starting Oct. 4, the former syndicated afternoon hosts will do a four-hour show each morning on XM Satellite Radio, where there are almost no content restrictions and which is creating a premium channel just for Gregg (Opie) Hughes and Anthony Cumia. That means fans have to buy an XM radio, pay the regular $9.99 monthly subscription fee and then pay an additional $1.99 per month for the new channel, which will start with just Opie and Anthony before it adds other programming.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Hume Opie Annan Jr., a retired vice president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, died of cancer May 7 at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland. He was 77 and a resident of Fort Ashby, W.Va., and formerly lived in Loch Raven Village. He was born in Tampa, Fla., and raised in Cumberland, and he worked his studies at Princeton University around merchant marine service in World War II. He graduated from the school in 1949 and was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa honors fraternity. After serving in the Army from 1950 to 1952, he moved to Baltimore and became vice president of corporate planning and research for Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 22, 1992
The only thing wrong with "Far and Away" is that it's near and close.A somewhat simple-minded, overwrought mock epic, it ought to get poor David Lean spinning in his grave. Imagine an Irish "Dr. HD as directed by Opie and you've got it.It was directed by Opie -- by the grown-up Ron Howard, that is -- and his worst move is to give the movie a lush, sprawling visual vocabulary. It has more helicopter shots than an air assault in Vietnam 20 years back, and when the camera in an opening sequence climbs a craggy spume---ed cliff, ascends a steep though emerald hill in the blazing sunshine to find a shanty Irish farmstead rusticating at a 90-degree angle in poverty so picturesque it could be a theme park in Orlando called Poorland, you know exactly where you are: in a movie.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 8, 2012
MAYBERRY, N.C. -- Former sheriff Andy Taylor died here last week. Mayberry is in mourning. Sheriff Taylor was one of the last links to another, simpler time. Before there was a traffic light or drive-through banking here, before we got our first cellphone tower or Wi-Fi connection, before the Dairy Queen, the Wal-Mart and the Subway were built out on Route 89, before color was invented, back when people still appeared to one another in shades of black and white, Mayberry was a very different town in a very different America.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
When Scott Pohlman showed up one afternoon for a pickup game with Auburn basketball players for the first time as a freshman, Bryant Smith figured that the scrawny kid who looked like he was about 12 was "a manager or something."Pohlman wasn't a manager.But he is something.Now a sophomore, the 6-foot-2, 160-pound shooting guard saved the top-seeded Tigers from elimination last weekend in the NCAA tournament's South Regional in Indianapolis.Against ninth-seeded Oklahoma State, Pohlman scored a career-high 28 points in an 81-74 victory that put Auburn (29-3)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | December 17, 1996
Hey, if you wish big, mean Baltimore could be just a little like small, friendly Mayberry, N.C., this gift's for you. "Say 'Hey' to these Happy Mayberry Accessories!," offered this holiday season Hawthorne Village sculptures, maker of those ubiquitous Christmas villages. "Bring your Mayberry town to life!" Hark, do tell us more! The $21.90 "Have a Great Day" set, for example, features Opie dashing to school and Aunt Bee in her Sunday best, headin' for church -- a sweet, timeless TV image captured in handcrafted pewter figurines.
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