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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2005
Dr. Abraham Kremen, a retired ophthalmologist and former Maryland General Hospital department chairman, died of multiple organ failure Thursday at Roland Park Place, where he had lived for the past eight years. He was 100. Born and raised in Baltimore, he was a 1923 graduate of City College. Teachers there recognized his musical ability and sent him to piano classes at the Peabody Conservatory, where instructors advised him against becoming a professional musician. Dr. Kremen earned a Bachelor of Science degree at the Johns Hopkins University and graduated from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Ann Elizabeth Stromberg, a retired orthoptist who worked with children with eye conditions and trained medical students during her six-decade career, died of Alzheimer's disease June 4 at Somerford Home in Columbia. The Ellicott City resident was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville on Delrey Avenue, she was the daughter of Henry Stromberg, a News American advertising salesman, and Edna Amanda Ray, a homemaker. She was a 1941 graduate of Mount de Sales Academy and earned a diploma at Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Pioneer Eye Care, founded by well-known retinal surgeon Bert M. Glaser, announced yesterday a contract with NYLCare Health Plans of the Mid-Atlantic to provide ophthalmology care for its 350,000 members, making Pioneer the largest provider of managed eye care in the region.Just a year after signing its first managed-care contract, Pioneer now covers eye care for half a million people. Its other major contract is with CIGNA HealthCare Mid-Atlantic, covering 120,000 members, according to Dr. Judith Goldstein, Pioneer's director of clinical services.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | October 15, 2013
Wearing cosmetic contact lenses might seem like a nice way to finish off a good Halloween costume, but they can cause serious eye injury, according to an association of ophthalmologists. Non-prescription contacts have been illegal since 2005 because they are considered medical devices but are still available in some stores and online, and customers seeking to augment their holiday outfits. Wearing them can result in permanent vision loss, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology . They may not be manufactured to meet federal health and safety standards, the group says, and cause cuts and sores in the protective layer of the iris and pupil or bacterial infections.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
William F. Bruther, whose career as an Annapolis ophthalmologist spanned nearly 40 years and included having served as chief of ophthalmology at Anne Arundel Medical Center, died Thursday of liver failure at the medical center. He was 70. Dr. Bruther was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Annapolis, where his father was chief of personnel at the Naval Academy and his mother was a registered nurse. After graduating from St. Mary's High School in Annapolis in 1957, he entered Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in biology.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Kathryn Klein, M.D., M.P.H. and an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Krieger Children's Eye Center at the Wilmer Institute, is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). She has subspecialty training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus. Klein received her bachelor's degree from Amherst College. She completed medical school at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and received a master's degree in public health from Columbia University.
NEWS
March 10, 1997
People in the newsDr. Ross D. Elliott has been appointed chief of the Department of Ophthalmology at Anne Arundel Medical Center. His office is at 2003 Medical Parkway, Suite G-90, in Anne Arundel Medical Center's Office Park, off Jennifer Road. Information: 571-0011.Pub Date: 3/10/97
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Dr. Herman Krieger Goldberg, former chief of ophthalmology at Sinai Hospital and ophthalmologist-in-chief at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, died of cardiac arrest Monday while golfing at Suburban Club. He was 91 and lived in Brooklandville. Dr. Goldberg, whose ophthalmological career spanned more than 60 years, was working, advising patients and writing until his death. "He was a very important national and international figure in 20th-century ophthalmology and a beloved figure at Hopkins," said Dr. Morton F. Goldberg, director of Johns Hopkins Hospital's Wilmer Eye Institute.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Christina R. Prescott, M.D., Ph.D. and an assistant professor of ophthalmology is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute of Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). Prescott specializes in medical and surgical management of serious corneal diseases including artificial corneas (keratoprosthesis) and modern forms of corneal transplants including Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty and deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. She also specializes in complex cases for laser vision correction and cataracts.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | March 8, 1991
THE highest-paid people in American higher education aren't presidents. They aren't administrators. They aren't business professors and others currently in high demand. They are professors in medical schools.The Chronicle of Higher Education is just out with its annual listing of the salaries earned by presidents and the five highest-paid employees at 25 prestigious private universities in 1988-89. At not one school did a president earn as much as his (or her, in the lone case of Hanna H. Gray of the University of Chicago)
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Kathryn Klein, M.D., M.P.H. and an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Krieger Children's Eye Center at the Wilmer Institute, is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). She has subspecialty training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus. Klein received her bachelor's degree from Amherst College. She completed medical school at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and received a master's degree in public health from Columbia University.
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Christina R. Prescott, M.D., Ph.D. and an assistant professor of ophthalmology is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute of Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). Prescott specializes in medical and surgical management of serious corneal diseases including artificial corneas (keratoprosthesis) and modern forms of corneal transplants including Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty and deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. She also specializes in complex cases for laser vision correction and cataracts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Dr. William Richard Green, the former head of the eye pathology laboratory of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital who was also a world-renowned pathologist-ophthalmologist, died July 5 from complications of heart disease and diabetes at his Ruxton home. He was 76. Dr. Green, the son of an Illinois Central Railroad inspector and a seamstress, was born and raised in Paducah, Ky. After graduating from Tilghman High School in 1952, he earned a bachelor's degree from Centre College in Danville, Ky., in 1955.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
William F. Bruther, whose career as an Annapolis ophthalmologist spanned nearly 40 years and included having served as chief of ophthalmology at Anne Arundel Medical Center, died Thursday of liver failure at the medical center. He was 70. Dr. Bruther was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Annapolis, where his father was chief of personnel at the Naval Academy and his mother was a registered nurse. After graduating from St. Mary's High School in Annapolis in 1957, he entered Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in biology.
NEWS
September 15, 2008
* Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Dr. Jeremy Nathans, professor of molecular biology and genetics and ophthalmology, and Dr. King-Wai Yau, professor of neuroscience and ophthalmology, have been awarded the $1.45 million 2008 Antonio Champalimaud Vision Award. The award, presented last week by the Champalimaud Foundation in Lisbon, Portugal, recognizes the researchers for their "ground-breaking discoveries in the laboratory that enhance our knowledge and understanding of vision."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Dr. Alfred Anthony Filar, a retired ophthalmologist and early retina specialist who found the time to make house calls during a lengthy career in eye care, died in his sleep of congestive heart failure April 13 at his Glen Arm home. He was 77. The Baltimore native was raised above his parents' florist shop at Eastern Avenue and Ann Street. As a young man he delivered floral arrangements by streetcar. He was a 1949 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he ran track, swam and played football.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | October 15, 2013
Wearing cosmetic contact lenses might seem like a nice way to finish off a good Halloween costume, but they can cause serious eye injury, according to an association of ophthalmologists. Non-prescription contacts have been illegal since 2005 because they are considered medical devices but are still available in some stores and online, and customers seeking to augment their holiday outfits. Wearing them can result in permanent vision loss, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology . They may not be manufactured to meet federal health and safety standards, the group says, and cause cuts and sores in the protective layer of the iris and pupil or bacterial infections.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | October 27, 1991
When Dr. Andrew Kessler finished his three-year ophthalmology residency at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore in 1990, he had seen enough of the city."
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 22, 2007
Nursing home residents with proper glasses enjoy life more and are less depressed than those with uncorrected vision problems, a study has found. Obvious? Perhaps, but nursing home residents have three to 15 times higher rates of uncorrected vision impairment than seniors living independently. Before testing their vision, researchers led by Cynthia Owsley, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, scored 150 nursing home residents on scales of quality of life and depression.
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