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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 1997
An audience of about 400 came Saturday to Quiet Waters Park and remained, despite mid-90-degree heat, for the entire Annapolis Opera program of "Operetta in the Park."All three singers were in fine voice and had stage presence, charm and more than enough stamina to qualify as dedicated troupers.Tenor Douglas Bowles sang in a pseudo-military uniform, including a high-collared shirt plus jacket, and still managed a romantic gaze at soprano Mary Gresock. Baritone Thomas Zielinski also seemed to enjoy performing in the heat.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Albert Hall, a professional opera singer and choirmaster who began his singing career during his student days at City College, died May 13 from colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Towson resident was 89. The son of a plumber and a homemaker, Albert Hall was born in Baltimore and raised on Rose Street. It was while he was attending City College in the late 1930s that he came to the attention of Blanche F. Bowlsbey, the legendary music teacher whom her students fondly called "Mrs.
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NEWS
By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 23, 1999
Perched at the piano between the stage and chorus bleachers, Marian Briscuso had her hands full.She tapped the keys and mouthed the words to help soloists on stage with the lyrics, then swung around to the chorus in midsong, mouthed some more words, then ran on stage to yell about a prop.She was almost as busy as, well, Benjamin Banneker.Briscuso was in the middle of a rehearsal of an operetta telling Banneker's life story. The approximately 70-member cast, including chorus singers, will perform today and tomorrow when the show will be presented at McCormick Elementary School in the Overlea area of Baltimore County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2010
In February 1971, a hearty bunch of teens sang in a production of Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado" at the Gilman School and enjoyed the experience so much that they decided to try another G&S operetta five months later, this time largely on their own. The students — most were from Gilman and Bryn Mawr schools in the beginning — called themselves the Gilman Summer Theater and chose as their inaugural venture that July a staging of...
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 2001
You might think that to avail yourself of choral music, operettas, an organ concerto, a Broadway show and an appearance by one of the greatest opera singers of all time, you'd have to subscribe to several concert series. But with the slate of concerts recently announced by the Annapolis Chorale for its 2001-2002 season, nothing could be further from the truth. The local music lover need travel no further than Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts and historic St. Anne's Church in downtown Annapolis to experience all this and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 3, 2002
If you needed evidence to support the (now outre) maxim that behind every successful man is a woman, the case of Jetty Treffz and her husband, Johann Strauss the Younger, works very well. If it weren't for her, he might never have gotten serious about composing operettas. And for a delectable example of how a philandering husband can have a clever wife right behind him, plotting and executing the perfect revenge, you can't do much better than Strauss' greatest operetta -- the greatest Viennese operetta, period -- Die Fledermaus.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 1996
The best thing about the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's youth production of Gilbert and Sullivan's wonderful operetta "The Pirates of Penzance" is that the kids are having a marvelous time entering into the snappy atmosphere that only a G&S show can create.As a result, facial takes are hammed up, pink parasols spin with abandon, mustachioed policemen shake their knees in abject fear, and most of W. S. Gilbert's spicy patter comes across like gangbusters.It's a fun show, as a large, enthusiastic audience found out Wednesday evening at the charming outdoor theater diagonally across from City Dock.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2004
Annapolis Opera began its 2004-2005 season with a "Vienna Dreams" program featuring Viennese and American operetta - a nostalgic diversion and welcome antidote to all the political news on the weekend before Election Day. Operetta is distinguished by gorgeous melodies, which seemed to flow from the pens of Viennese composers Franz Lehar and Johann Strauss, and Americans Sigmund Romberg and Victor Herbert. This lyrical music held sway in the mid- to late 19th-century Vienna and reached its American peak in the Depression-era films of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy, America's singing sweethearts, through the late '40s.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 17, 2000
An emperor's son disguised as "a second trombone." An executioner who wouldn't hurt a fly. A bribe-hungry bureaucrat who has managed to secure every official job worth having, including archbishop and first commissioner of police. Out of such stuff Gilbert and Sullivan concocted a time-resistant masterwork of tuneful comedy and satire. The enduring powers of "The Mikado" can be savored in the Young Victorian Theatre Company's production at the Bryn Mawr School, which celebrates the company's 30 years of devotion to the G & S canon.
NEWS
By Becky S. Yoshitani and Becky S. Yoshitani,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1998
A visit to Howard County Community College's Rep Stage for a rehearsal proves staging a musical is a workout.Mark Aldrich, romantic lead, perches on a chair next to the piano and croons his wistful ballad. His voice soars and sighs as the music director coaches him, extending the pure dulcet notes to balance softly in the air.After the final tones drift away, he clasps an ice pack to his knee and hobbles offstage.Rep Stage is presenting "Man With a Load of Mischief" -- the second musical in its five-year existence at the Theatre Outback at Howard County Community College in Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
There is something gloriously indestructible about the operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan. The music sounds fresh and charming, even in the most jaded or cynical of times. The plots manage to hold up, even when their seams show, and still generate sufficient interest and humor. The Pirates of Penzance is a particularly strong example, boasting a felicitous score that reveals the remarkable depth of Sullivan's lyrical craft and his ability to complement Gilbert's clever words imaginatively.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | February 18, 2008
An obscure and fascinating chapter of African-American history came vibrantly to life Saturday night, along with an obscure and fascinating example of 19th-century entertainment. This dual exploration of the past was a result of an ambitious venture by the Music Center at Strathmore, which moved from its usual presenter mode into producer status with Free to Sing: The Story of the First African-American Opera Company. Such a hefty title might arouse suspicions of stuffiness, but this sold-out multimedia presentation steered clear of a lecture-y tone.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | July 10, 2007
For its annual production of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, the Young Victorian Theatre Company has not so much sprinkled Baltimore-isms on H.M.S. Pinafore as drowned the old vessel in them. That's not to say the result is all wet, but merely to point out that anyone who prefers G&S reasonably undiluted may have some trouble swallowing this concoction. Saturday night's opening performance at the Bryn Mawr School generated enough musical values and high spirits, though, to keep the ever-fresh spark of Sullivan's brilliant score burning nicely.
NEWS
May 5, 2007
Nancy S. Pendleton, a retired city schools guidance counselor, died of heart disease April 26 at St. Joseph Medical Center. A resident of the Edenwald retirement community in Towson, she was 82. Born Nancy Tyson Lee Scott in Baltimore and raised on a northern Baltimore County farm, she was a 1943 graduate of Bryn Mawr School and that year made her debut at the Bachelors Cotillon. After attending Bryn Mawr College, she earned a master's degree in psychology from what is now Towson University.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | July 16, 2006
Fringe Festival A little bizarre, a bit offbeat and quite definitely original, the Capital Fringe Festival is all about art outside the lines. The festival, the first of its kind in Washington, offers a celebration of the avant-garde in the performing arts. More than 100 performers from theater, music, dance, spoken word and puppetry will present more than 400 performances at about 30 venues during the 11-day festival, which runs Thursday through July 30. From Cordelia's Fool, a one-woman clown show with Wyckham Avery inspired by Shakespeare's King Lear (July 23-30 at Sixth and I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. N.W.)
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 9, 2006
It is not too much of a stretch to say that the world might not know Gilbert and Sullivan today had it not been for The Sorcerer, the first full-length operetta they created together. It's also not much of a stretch to say that an awful lot of people don't know a note or a line of The Sorcerer. And that's a pity. THE SORCERER -- 3 p.m. today and July 16, and 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday -- Bryn Mawr School, 109 W. Melrose Ave. // Tickets $35 -- 410-323-3077 or yvtc.org.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 17, 1999
The summer concert series at Quiet Waters Park begins at 6 p.m. Saturday with operetta and musical comedy favorites by the Annapolis Opera.The program, to feature some of the most beloved melodies by operetta's greatest composers, might well be called "It's a Grand Night for Singing," the Rodgers and Hammerstein tune from "State Fair," that will open and close the evening. Among other favorites the opera will perform are Victor Herbert's "Will You Remember" from "Maytime," "Art is Calling for Me" from "Enchantress," Sigmund Romberg's "Serenade" and "Deep in My Heart," from "Student Prince" and "One Kiss" from "New Moon."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 20, 1998
Gilbert and Sullivan's famed operetta "H.M.S. Pinafore" is generally produced on a lavish scale with a slew of sailors, not to mention the Lord of the Admiralty's myriad sisters, cousins and aunts.But Center Stage has shrunk the ship down to dinghy size and turned the show into a chamber operetta with a crew of only six sailors and a mere quartet of sisters, cousins and aunts. "Pinafore," however, is not only a sturdy enough vessel to remain afloat, it comes through shipshape.This charming and amusing production is the theater's first Gilbert and Sullivan, and it's hardly surprising that director Irene Lewis has tampered with tradition in staging it. After all, G&S can be seen as the Shakespeare of operettas, and this is a theater -- and a director -- never content to stage Shakespeare as it was done in his day.Nor is size (which is mainly a budgetary concern)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2005
Winter festival The lowdown -- The Winter Family Festival at the Walters Art Museum may not be your typical wintry celebration, but it is still true to its name. The winter arts festival, Saturday throughout the museum, celebrates winter south of the equator. Families can enjoy music from Inca Son and Downtown Rhythm Express, storytelling of Candace Wolf, rainforest-themed music from the Fun Company, flamenco dancing from Arte Flamenco, and exotic arts-and-crafts activities. If you go -- The festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. Free.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to the Sun | September 23, 2005
Fully recovered from the financial crisis that allowed for only one fully staged production last season, the leaders of Annapolis Opera anticipate a much brighter 2005-2006. "We're starting this season with no long-term debt and with money in the bank," opera President Dennis Monk said recently. From 2000 until 2003, Annapolis Opera staged two operas each season. But in the 2003-2004 season, the opera was able to put on only Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado. The production was critically acclaimed and well attended.
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