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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 8, 2012
After a months-long hiatus, the city-owned Hollywood Diner has reopened under new operators. Formerly known as the The Hollywood Diner presents Thomasino's, the restaurant is open for breakfast and lunch on weekdays, and on Sunday mornings during the Baltimore Farmers' Market. The breakfast menu includes omelets, pancakes and platters. The lunch line-up features panini, sandwiches, pastas and wings. Late last year, the city terminated its lease with the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development, the nonprofit organization that ran the diner since 1991. In July, the city announced that it had selected the bid of Thomasino's Pizza Subs & Pasta, LLC, owned by Richard T. White.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When the new six-screen, 752-seat cinema opens in mid-November in the Sun Valley Shopping Center in Glen Burnie, it will be the second theater in the community operated by the same man. Ira Miller, president of Sun Valley Movie Theaters Inc., also owns Marley Station Movies in Glen Burnie. The Sun Valley 6, which will show first-run discounted movies, is under construction as part of the remodeling of the center at the intersection of Mountain Road and Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
With a little more than two weeks to go before a contract extension between East Coast and Gulf dockworkers and port operators expires, the federal mediator said Thursday that progress is being made toward a long-term settlement. George Cohen, director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, said the International Longshoremen's Association representing 14,500 union members and United States Maritime Alliance, which represents 14 ports and shipping companies, met between Tuesday and Thursday, and have agreed "that the negotiations will continue under our auspices.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A man who was operating a mini steamroller that rolled over and trapped him Wednesday afternoon has died, Baltimore County authorities said Thursday. Michael Ray Mathews, 64, of Freeland, was using the mini steamroller to flatten out a pile of dirt when the pile collapsed, causing the steamroller to roll over and trap him underneath, county police said. Another worker at the site, in the 600 block of Belfast Road in Sparks, used another piece of equipment to lift the steamroller so that Mathews could be pulled out. Mathews was taken to St. Joseph's Medical Center, where he later died.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
A grand jury indicted two operators of a prescription drug clinic in Timonium arrested in a Tuesday raid on charges of conspiracy to distribute Schedule II narcotics. A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge set a $50,000 cash-only bail Thursday for Gerald Wiseberg of Boca Raton, Fla., and Michael Jacob Reznikov of Brooklyn, N.Y., operators at the Healthy Life Medical Group in the 1100 block of York Road. At a preliminary hearing, Wiseberg, 78, and Reznikov, 51, were prohibited from leaving the country and were ordered to give up their passports.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2001
Anne Arundel County police have fired two emergency operators who they say botched a 911 call about the carjacking that resulted in the death of a Glen Burnie pharmacist, police and union officials confirmed yesterday. Officials from the union representing the operators said they will appeal the decision. Police commanders said the firings of the 911 call taker and dispatcher were in the best interest of public safety. Yvette A. Beakes was assaulted Aug. 8. She was later found shot to death.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
Response to the easing of restrictions on assisted living housing has been so high that Baltimore County will hold a seminar today for prospective operators.The County Council passed a bill in January that allows homes for as many as 15 elderly residents without special zoning approval, if the house to be used needs no more than a 25 percent expansion.Construction of a building or any expansion of more than 25 percent would require a special zoning exception, a slow, expensive process that includes a public hearing.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
The operators of the state's thoroughbred and harness track will meet Friday at Laurel Race Course to discuss their inter-track wagering agreement.On the agenda will be a renegotiation of the financial terms of the arrangement, which so far has weighed heavily in favor of the harness management.In a letter to harness officials last week, Joe De Francis, thePimlico-Laurel track operator, vowed to end the inter-track agreement unless the terms are changed.Jim Mango, general manager of the thoroughbred group, said yesterday that "it appears on face value that our operation at Rosecroft is not benefiting from this.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
Anne Arundel's sand and gravel operators say they face financial ruin if the County Council doesn't soften a tough new bill governing the excavation industry.Representatives of the county's 31 sand and gravel firms who packed the council chambers Monday night said they will support the new county regulations -- if the council makes key changes regarding the permitting process, hours of operation and the kind of machinery that can be used on site."It's a very tough bill," said William Natter, president of Natter Services Inc., an Annapolis sand and gravel firm.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | May 24, 1993
WARRENTON, Va. -- Potential operators of a racetrack in Virginia met for the first time in one public forum yesterday at the annual meeting of the Virginia Thoroughbred Association and disagreed sharply on how racing should be conducted in the state.Five of the six potential operators, who must file an application with the Virginia Racing Commission by Oct. 1 to gain licensing approval, either attended the meeting at the Airlie Conference Center or sent a representative.At one end of the spectrum is James J. Wilson, a Middleburg, Va., farm owner and president and chief executive officer of Interstate General Company, L.P., a real estate firm that operates El Comandante Race Course in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
Staff Reports and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Ironmark, a printing and image consultant company that was formed through the 2011 merger of Frank Gumpert Printing and Corporate Printing Solutions, announced Monday it will consolidate its Annapolis and Hunt Valley operations into a new headquarters in Howard County. In a news release, company officials said Ironmark's 110 employees will relocate to a 50,000-square-foot facility in Annapolis Junction by Oct. 8. The move comes three years after Frank Gumpert Printing, in Annapolis, and Corporate Printing Solutions, in Hunt Valley, merged to become CPS Gumpert.
NEWS
Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A new anti-violence program led Baltimore police to raid the home of a convicted drug dealer they had hoped to reform, and to nearly $4 million worth of drugs and cash, a significant seizure for the department. Standing over a table displaying $825,000 cash and nearly 12 kilograms of heroin, police officials said Shawn Antonio Hearn, a 41-year-old with a prior federal drug conviction, had been given a chance through the Operation Ceasefire program. He didn't take that chance, they said.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The former beverage manager at the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is suing the hotel's operator for wrongful or abusive discharge, harassment, gender discrimination and for creating a hostile work environment.  In the suit, Tiffany Dawn Cianci claims she was harassed repeatedly by her superiors and ultimately terminated after refusing to sell alcohol that she believed was acquired outside of Maryland law. She also cites what the suit called “humiliating”...
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A chain of more than 50 mid-Atlantic physical therapy clinics that rebranded itself Pivot Physical Therapy earlier this month has added five clinics in West Virginia, officials said Wednesday. The chain has 37 facilities in Maryland, some of which were known as Maryland SportsCare & Rehab. Operations won't change at the facilities, but officials believe operating as one organization enables the company to leverage the reputation of more than 500 physical therapists, certified athletic trainers and support staff.
NEWS
By Dan Ervin | August 26, 2014
Maryland is failing to deal squarely with the problem of carbon emissions from electricity production. Given growing public concern about climate change, a fundamental change in our energy policy should be to reduce the burning of fossil fuels and pursue the development of emission-free nuclear power. That will take time and resources, with far greater emphasis on developing a diverse mix of low-carbon energy sources. Revising Maryland's renewable electricity standard to include nuclear power would provide a good beginning, since it would recognize the importance of the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in meeting the Environmental Protection Agency's requirement to curb greenhouse gases from electricity generation by 36.5 percent by 2030.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 7, 1992
For the first passengers on the Howard Street section of the light-rail line, it was deja vu.Years ago, these veteran Mass Transit Administration employees, most in their 50s and 60s, operated the city's fleet of streetcars and trackless trolleys. Today, they are training as light-rail motormen.They clearly enjoy their new jobs. When their big white streetcar coasted through the longtime retail district yesterday, awed pedestrians waved their hands. The streetcar's operator rang its bell in response.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
PORTLAND, Maine -- In a cavernous, festively decorated room far to the north of Baltimore, hundreds of workers busily take orders day and night to make sure that holiday wishes are fulfilled come Christmas morning.They are not concerned whether you've been naughty or nice. Your credit card number will do. For these resolutely cheerful workers with the telephone headsets don't report to Santa Claus.They answer to another icon in these parts, "L.L.," as he's referred to here, the late founder of L.L. Bean, one of the largest, oldest and most famous mail-order catalog companies in the world.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Following two days of controlled demonstrations, Horseshoe Casino Baltimore won state regulators' approval Monday as to open as scheduled Tuesday night. The $442 million development near M&T Bank Stadium becomes Maryland's fifth casino to receive an operating license. MGM Resorts expects to open the sixth at National Harbor in Prince George's County in two years The Horseshoe's license was signed by Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency Director Stephen Martino. Thousands of customers, including local politicians and celebrities, are expected at Tuesday night's opening.
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