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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | May 10, 1992
From expeditions five centuries ago when stars guided explorers across the oceans to modern-day missions guided by satellites, Baltimore's Operation Sail '92 will remember them all during a four-month waterfront exposition that will begin May 29.Officials expect to attract about 250,000 people to the waterfront exhibitions in the Inner Harbor and Fells Point.The event will continue through June 8, when authentic replicas of Christopher Columbus' ships -- the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria -- will parade up the Chesapeake Bay and into Baltimore's harbor.
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NEWS
June 19, 2012
"And all I ask for is a tall ship and a star to sail her by. " Those words are from John Masefield's "Sea-Fever," a poem that evokes strong feelings of nostalgia for the maritime life of the past and all the beauty and adventure that came with it. Baltimore had its own bout of sea fever this past week, and it was just what the doctor ordered. It will be months before Sailabration organizers have an official tally of exactly how many people came to Baltimore to see the 17 tall-masted ships and 28 military vessels that arrived last Wednesday to launch Maryland's War of 1812 bicentennial celebration, but it's safe to assume tourists numbered in the hundreds of thousands (if not 1 million or more)
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NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | May 1, 1993
Ships from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States will drop anchor at the Inner Harbor and Fells Point over the next four months for Baltimore Operation Sail '93."We have a variety of ships this year, from one of the world's largest tall ships to one of the smallest replicas," said Mary Sue McCarthy, executive director of Operation Sail.That replica is the Half Moon, a first-time visitor that is a copy of a ship built in 1608 by the Dutch East India Co. and sailed by Henry Hudson in 1609.
NEWS
By Holton F. Brown | September 2, 1994
DANES DOWNTOWNThe Danish tall ship Danmark is scheduled to arrive at the Inner Harbor about 11 a.m. today, docking at the West Wall through the Labor Day weekend.The three-masted, full-rigged, 253-foot-long training vessel has been a popular attraction during its several visits to the city over the past 18 years.The ship maintains a long heritage. The seafaring Danes' first training ship is thought to have sailed during the 16th century.The Danmark, which is used to train 80 Danish merchant marine cadets, will be open to the public for free tours from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.
NEWS
May 24, 1992
One of the unique joys of the 1976 bicentennial year was the visit of the tall ships to Baltimore. Over the summer, 11 of those graceful vessels sailed up the Chesapeake to moor at the Inner Harbor basin. Tens of thousands of Baltimoreans came to view them. Even at 4 a.m., night owls could be seen admiring those ocean-goers.Happily for those who missed the 1976 event, those moments and memories will soon be repeated. From May 29 to Sept. 9, close to 30 sailing ships from Spain, Brazil, the Netherlands, Uruguay, Portugal, Italy, Germany and England are scheduled to visit the Inner Harbor as part of Baltimore's Operation Sail '92. They range from tall ships to frigates and schooners.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Robby Burch stood on deck of the Nina at the Inner Harbor yesterday, wrapped in a yellow slicker, pelted by rain, fielding questions from a stream of curious visitors.The questions went like this: How long did it take the replica of Christopher Columbus' famous ship to cross the Atlantic Ocean? (Thirty days.) Do people live below-deck? (Yes.) How many crew members are there? (Fourteen.) How about on the larger Santa Maria? (Twenty-nine.) Why is the deck curved? (So water runs off.)Mr. Burch, 24, had volunteered as a guide for Operation Sail, a committee that is host to the Baltimore stop of a tour commemorating the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage to the New World.
NEWS
By Holton F. Brown | September 2, 1994
DANES DOWNTOWNThe Danish tall ship Danmark is scheduled to arrive at the Inner Harbor about 11 a.m. today, docking at the West Wall through the Labor Day weekend.The three-masted, full-rigged, 253-foot-long training vessel has been a popular attraction during its several visits to the city over the past 18 years.The ship maintains a long heritage. The seafaring Danes' first training ship is thought to have sailed during the 16th century.The Danmark, which is used to train 80 Danish merchant marine cadets, will be open to the public for free tours from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
The Kruzenshtern, a 378-foot, four-masted sailing vessel from the Soviet Union, is scheduled to begin a 10-day goodwill visit to the Inner Harbor tomorrow. And during its stay, some crew members will meet with state officials to observe Maryland's research into techniques of aquaculture.Operated by the USSR Ministry of Fisheries and carrying a crew of more than 200, including 160 cadets and eight school teachers, the ship was in Norfolk last weekend. It is making Baltimore its only other U.S. port of call before embarking July 22 to its home port of Talin, Estonia.
NEWS
June 19, 2012
"And all I ask for is a tall ship and a star to sail her by. " Those words are from John Masefield's "Sea-Fever," a poem that evokes strong feelings of nostalgia for the maritime life of the past and all the beauty and adventure that came with it. Baltimore had its own bout of sea fever this past week, and it was just what the doctor ordered. It will be months before Sailabration organizers have an official tally of exactly how many people came to Baltimore to see the 17 tall-masted ships and 28 military vessels that arrived last Wednesday to launch Maryland's War of 1812 bicentennial celebration, but it's safe to assume tourists numbered in the hundreds of thousands (if not 1 million or more)
NEWS
May 1, 1993
Here are the ships and other events scheduled by Baltimore Operation Sail and CSX Corp. this year, including where the visitors are expected to dock. Dates are subject to change.APRIL 30-MAY 4: Whiting, a 163-foot survey vessel used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Inner Harbor, West Wall.MAY 20-30: Spirit of Massachusetts, a 125-foot schooner. Broadway Pier, Fells Point.JUNE 2-6: Bluenose II of Nova Scotia, a 161-foot gaff-rigged, two-masted schooner. Inner Harbor, Finger Piers.
NEWS
May 1, 1993
Here are the ships and other events scheduled by Baltimore Operation Sail and CSX Corp. this year, including where the visitors are expected to dock. Dates are subject to change.APRIL 30-MAY 4: Whiting, a 163-foot survey vessel used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Inner Harbor, West Wall.MAY 20-30: Spirit of Massachusetts, a 125-foot schooner. Broadway Pier, Fells Point.JUNE 2-6: Bluenose II of Nova Scotia, a 161-foot gaff-rigged, two-masted schooner. Inner Harbor, Finger Piers.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler and Karen Zeiler,Contributing Writer | May 1, 1993
Ships from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States will drop anchor at the Inner Harbor and Fells Point over the next four months for Baltimore Operation Sail '93."We have a variety of ships this year, from one of the world's largest tall ships to one of the smallest replicas," said Mary Sue McCarthy, executive director of Operation Sail.That replica is the Half Moon, a first-time visitor that is a copy of a ship built in 1608 by the Dutch East India Co. and sailed by Henry Hudson in 1609.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Robby Burch stood on deck of the Nina at the Inner Harbor yesterday, wrapped in a yellow slicker, pelted by rain, fielding questions from a stream of curious visitors.The questions went like this: How long did it take the replica of Christopher Columbus' famous ship to cross the Atlantic Ocean? (Thirty days.) Do people live below-deck? (Yes.) How many crew members are there? (Fourteen.) How about on the larger Santa Maria? (Twenty-nine.) Why is the deck curved? (So water runs off.)Mr. Burch, 24, had volunteered as a guide for Operation Sail, a committee that is host to the Baltimore stop of a tour commemorating the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage to the New World.
NEWS
May 24, 1992
One of the unique joys of the 1976 bicentennial year was the visit of the tall ships to Baltimore. Over the summer, 11 of those graceful vessels sailed up the Chesapeake to moor at the Inner Harbor basin. Tens of thousands of Baltimoreans came to view them. Even at 4 a.m., night owls could be seen admiring those ocean-goers.Happily for those who missed the 1976 event, those moments and memories will soon be repeated. From May 29 to Sept. 9, close to 30 sailing ships from Spain, Brazil, the Netherlands, Uruguay, Portugal, Italy, Germany and England are scheduled to visit the Inner Harbor as part of Baltimore's Operation Sail '92. They range from tall ships to frigates and schooners.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | May 10, 1992
From expeditions five centuries ago when stars guided explorers across the oceans to modern-day missions guided by satellites, Baltimore's Operation Sail '92 will remember them all during a four-month waterfront exposition that will begin May 29.Officials expect to attract about 250,000 people to the waterfront exhibitions in the Inner Harbor and Fells Point.The event will continue through June 8, when authentic replicas of Christopher Columbus' ships -- the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria -- will parade up the Chesapeake Bay and into Baltimore's harbor.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | July 11, 1991
The Kruzenshtern, a 378-foot, four-masted sailing vessel from the Soviet Union, is scheduled to begin a 10-day goodwill visit to the Inner Harbor tomorrow. And during its stay, some crew members will meet with state officials to observe Maryland's research into techniques of aquaculture.Operated by the USSR Ministry of Fisheries and carrying a crew of more than 200, including 160 cadets and eight school teachers, the ship was in Norfolk last weekend. It is making Baltimore its only other U.S. port of call before embarking July 22 to its home port of Talin, Estonia.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
As tall ships from around the world sail into Baltimore today on a goodwill tour, international intrigue roils beneath the decks. Operation Sail was conceived to smooth diplomatic waters between the United States and other nations, but this year's tour of East Coast ports has turned into a bidding war for ships among port cities, which has made some nations uncomfortable and a few ships change course. Cities including Baltimore, New York and Philadelphia refuse to pay ships, in part because it would be insulting to imply that symbols of national pride are for sale.
TOPIC
By Stacie Jonas and Sarah Anderson | June 18, 2000
TALL SHIPS FROM around the world are scheduled to sail into Baltimore's Inner Harbor on Friday for what organizers are touting as an event to promote "cultural exchange and good will." The ships will surely be a majestic sight. But behind the stately image of one of these ships, La Esmeralda, lies a terrifying history that should not be forgotten. In 1973, in the aftermath of a bloody coup against the democratically elected government, the Chilean Navy made a special contribution to the new military junta led by Gen. Augusto Pinochet.
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