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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 22, 2002
The University of Maryland Medical Center hopes to win Army approval for a $2.5 million grant to help develop an "operating room of the future" for military hospitals. A Department of Defense appropriations bill signed recently by President Bush includes money to help the Army's Telemedicine and Advanced Research Center at Fort Detrick develop new operating room technology. The hospital wants to use part of this money to work with the Army on devices such as wireless communications systems, which surgeons could use to talk with doctors throughout the building, said Timothy Ganous, the medical center's technology planner.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. Jay N. Karpa, a retired Baltimore surgeon who was also certified in chronic wound care, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 79. "As a person, he was a true gentleman. He was kind and compassionate and treated his patients like they were his family," said Dr. Alan S. Davis, who is chairman of the department of surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. "And he was a superb surgeon and was always cool and calm in the OR. " The son of Isador Karpa, a pharmacist, and Dora Karpa, a homemaker, Jay Norman Karpa was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Dr. Jay N. Karpa, a retired Baltimore surgeon who was also certified in chronic wound care, died Friday of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 79. "As a person, he was a true gentleman. He was kind and compassionate and treated his patients like they were his family," said Dr. Alan S. Davis, who is chairman of the department of surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. "And he was a superb surgeon and was always cool and calm in the OR. " The son of Isador Karpa, a pharmacist, and Dora Karpa, a homemaker, Jay Norman Karpa was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
I read with interest Susan Reimer 's April 21st column: "A gender gap in confidence," expressing concern about women's lack of confidence. In the 1960s and early 1970s, very few women went to medical school. Our 1969 graduating class at the University of Maryland School of Medicine included six women out of 125 graduates. Nevertheless the following incident occurred to the first woman surgical resident at a major hospital. The first day, when she showed up in the Operating Room anteroom to undress and gown, she was confronted with two doors: "Doctors" and "Nurses.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
I read with interest Susan Reimer 's April 21st column: "A gender gap in confidence," expressing concern about women's lack of confidence. In the 1960s and early 1970s, very few women went to medical school. Our 1969 graduating class at the University of Maryland School of Medicine included six women out of 125 graduates. Nevertheless the following incident occurred to the first woman surgical resident at a major hospital. The first day, when she showed up in the Operating Room anteroom to undress and gown, she was confronted with two doors: "Doctors" and "Nurses.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Stacey Gaskin's life is filled with scalpels, blood and antiseptic scrub. It also is rich in frilly dresses, painted nails and shiny patent leather shoes.The balancing act feels perfectly natural to Ms. Gaskin, an operating room assistant at Anne Arundel Medical Center and owner of a modeling school for low-income children in Annapolis.Yesterday, Ms. Gaskin left her blue scrubs at home and donned fancy clothes for her fifth annual Mother's Day fashion show, at the Annapolis Marriott Waterfront Hotel.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
FOCUS ON PEOPLE Longtime Catonsville resident Helen Trump retired Dec. 31 from St. Agnes Hospital, after devoting more than 44 years as a nurse in the hospital's Coronary Care/Intensive Care Unit, except for a 12-month assignment in the operating room. She was honored as Hospital Nurse of the Year in 2004. On Sept. 7, 1969, Trump graduated from the Chesapeake & Ohio Hospital School of Nursing, in Clifton Forge, Va. After her wedding two weeks later, she and her husband moved to Catonsville.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
SINGAPORE -- More than 48 hours into their marathon operation to separate conjoined Iranian twins, surgeons today finished separating the girls, who were in critical condition, a spokesman at Raffles Hospital said. "We should pray very hard for them," Dr. Prem Kumar Nair said. Nair said the surgery had been slowed because the brain tissues of Ladan and Laleh Bijani were tightly fused together. The separation of the brains was originally expected to take from eight to 10 hours. But Nair said the work -- which was done millimeter by millimeter -- had taken much longer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 19, 2008
Dr. James Russo, a retired anesthesiologist who established the department of anesthesiology at what is now Mercy Medical Center, died Saturday of heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 91. Dr. Russo, the son of an immigrant Italian grocer, was born and raised in Norristown, Pa. He was a 1935 graduate of Norristown High School and earned a bachelor's degree from Ursinus College in 1939. "He had a brother who was 18 years older who had gone to medical school, and he wanted to follow in his footsteps," said a daughter, Elena R. Trentalange of Glen Arm. After earning his medical degree in 1943 from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, he completed an internship at what is now Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby, Pa., and an internship in anesthesia at the Lahey Clinic in Boston.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | August 29, 1991
Financially strapped Kirschner Medical Corp. received a lift from Maryland National Bank in the form of an agreement to restructure $17.3 million in debt, Kirschner said yesterday.Arrangements were also made to link a $12 million line of credit to inventory and receivables, according to Dr. C. Scott Harrison, chairman of the board, president and chief executive officer."Kirschner had a large amount of debt that was demand debt, which means that it could be called at any time," Dr. Harrison said.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
FOCUS ON PEOPLE Longtime Catonsville resident Helen Trump retired Dec. 31 from St. Agnes Hospital, after devoting more than 44 years as a nurse in the hospital's Coronary Care/Intensive Care Unit, except for a 12-month assignment in the operating room. She was honored as Hospital Nurse of the Year in 2004. On Sept. 7, 1969, Trump graduated from the Chesapeake & Ohio Hospital School of Nursing, in Clifton Forge, Va. After her wedding two weeks later, she and her husband moved to Catonsville.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
I have followed Dr. Ben Carson's accomplishments over the years and watched as he has saved lives. In the quiet of an operating room, he saved children's lives with no regard of race, creed or gender. If it was any one of these people's children he saved, would they be barking about him right now ("Dr. Ben Carson steps down as speaker at Hopkins graduation," April 11)? Or would they stand up for him because he believes in something they don't? Dr. Carson says what he believes in. I never heard him say everyone else must believe in it also.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
John Stewart Croucher, a retired hospital assistant engineer and World War II naval veteran, died of a stroke Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Bel Air resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, he was a graduate of the old Thomas A. Edison Vocational School on Howard Street. Many years later, he completed adult night school at City College. He also studied physics at what was then Essex Community College. Family members said Mr. Croucher was an accomplished machinist and worked at the Flynn & Emrich foundry on Holliday Street in downtown Baltimore in the early 1940s.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
Marion Snyder Goldstein, a nurse who supervised operating rooms for decades at the now-closed Children's Hospital on Greenspring Avenue, died Tuesday at Stella Maris assisted living in Timonium. The longtime Baldwin resident was 92. The family was not provided a cause of death, though Mrs. Goldstein's physical and mental health had been in decline for several years, said daughter Deborah Drimer of Lutherville. Marion Snyder was born in Scranton, Pa., where she was raised and lived across the street from the Nay Aug Park zoo. She regularly visited Tilly the elephant there, often taking a banana as a snack for the pachyderm.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Leasing office space in this economy can be a challenge, especially in older buildings, but Taylor Fields is working on getting an edge: a super-fast fiber-optic broadband connection. "One of the first things [prospective tenants] ask is what kind of Internet service we have," said Fields, a Timonium-based commercial leasing agent for the James F. Knott Realty Corp. "They all want fast Internet. " As work begins on a fiber-optic broadband network that will connect every Maryland school, hospital, police station — and even more public buildings — businesses also want to get involved.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
Elizabeth D. "Bette" Ermer, a registered nurse and former operating room supervisor, died Tuesday from complications of a brain tumor at Sinai Hospital. The Lochearn resident was 88. Elizabeth Davis, the daughter of a sheet metal worker and a registered nurse, was born and raised in Scranton, Pa. She was a 1938 graduate of Central High School and earned her nursing degree in 1943 from the Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing in Scranton. She moved to Baltimore during World War II after marrying Jack Morgan, who was an ensign in the Navy.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 29, 2007
There were no relatives in the hospital when the young man died, so Millie Brown and her co-workers in the operating room reached for a wallet in his pants to find some identification. The pants were wet, and so were the wallet and the thick stack of cash inside - blood money from the streets of Baltimore. Another young, African-American male lay on an operating table at Johns Hopkins Hospital, dead from five, maybe six bullets to the upper body. Many young men come, bleeding or unconscious, by ambulance to one of the greatest hospitals in the world, direct from the streets of East Baltimore - sometimes from only a few blocks away, where the paramedics and homicide detectives find them.
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