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June 15, 2006
Rosemary M. Malooly, a homemaker and longtime Parkville resident, died Monday of complications from a stroke at her daughter's Homeland residence. She was 92. Rosemary Murphy was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. She was a graduate of the parish school of St. Martin Roman Catholic Church and attended the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. In 1942, she married William Francis Malooly and settled in Parkville, where she raised her family and lived the remainder of her life.
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NEWS
June 15, 2006
Rosemary M. Malooly, a homemaker and longtime Parkville resident, died Monday of complications from a stroke at her daughter's Homeland residence. She was 92. Rosemary Murphy was born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue. She was a graduate of the parish school of St. Martin Roman Catholic Church and attended the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. In 1942, she married William Francis Malooly and settled in Parkville, where she raised her family and lived the remainder of her life.
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NEWS
April 12, 2006
Dorothy M. Rembski, a former secretary and an opera buff, died of heart failure Monday at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. She was 87. She was born Dorothy Marie Klein in Baltimore and raised on Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore. She attended city public schools and a business school. She then worked as a secretary for Dr. Nathan Frank Spector, a Baltimore chiropractor, whom she married in 1943. He died in 1974. The former longtime Ten Hills resident was married in 1981 to Stanislav Rembski, the internationally known Baltimore portraitist, who died in 1998.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Dorothy M. Rembski, a former secretary and an opera buff, died of heart failure Monday at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. She was 87. She was born Dorothy Marie Klein in Baltimore and raised on Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore. She attended city public schools and a business school. She then worked as a secretary for Dr. Nathan Frank Spector, a Baltimore chiropractor, whom she married in 1943. He died in 1974. The former longtime Ten Hills resident was married in 1981 to Stanislav Rembski, the internationally known Baltimore portraitist, who died in 1998.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
Rose G. Breslau Harris, who outlived two husbands, her two sons, and at 98 still was living independently, loving music, walking, playing cards and being with relatives, died of pneumonia Monday at Sinai Hospital.The former Rose Glasser, a resident of the Highfield House on North Charles Street for more than 30 years, was the first-born child in Baltimore of Jewish immigrant parents who came to the city in 1894 from Latvia."She was one of six and the 'American baby' when she was born," said her grandson, Andrew Breslau of New York City.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | July 2, 1992
When Mike Svec's Annapolis High School orchestra performed Mozart's bubbly, rollicking overture to "Cosi fan tutte" a few years back, one of his young violinists, Robin Pomerance, fell in love with the music and wondered what the rest of the opera sounded like.She wasted no time finding out. Before long, the opera bug bit as only the opera bug can.Now a 24-year-old graduate of the University of California at Santa Cruz, Pomerance is in a wonderful position to indulge her passion for Verdi, Puccini and Mozart as a rehearsal department assistant for the San Francisco Opera Company.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
Reginald Calvert Orem, a retired Cambridge newspaper editor, bon vivant, bibliophile and opera buff, died Sunday at Dorchester General Hospital of heart failure. He was 89.Known as a man of refined tastes and charm who regularly indulged his passion for the printed word, he was known for his daily visits to the Dorchester County Public Library.The rhythmic tapping of his walking stick could be heard striking the ancient red bricks of High Street, the oldest street in Cambridge, as he made his regular midmorning passage to the library.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 20, 1992
MANY YEARS ago RCA Victor issued a record titled "Opera for People Who Hate Opera." It featured popular arias such as the toreador song from Bizet's "Carmen."I don't know if it actually made many converts to opera, but its premise, at least in theory, was an admirable one: Demonstrate that opera can be melodic and pleasing to the ear and not discordant and shrill, and the listener's interest may be stimulated. In other words, give it a little juice and they will come.What I am recommending for people who hate opera or who have never given it a fair chance is more drastic than RCA's concept: Go see an opera given by the Baltimore Opera Company.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 11, 1998
On the way to the opera, we heard a man belch. It was loud and clear and uninhibited, a belch with gusto, delivered on Mount Royal Avenue, about 100 paces from the front door of the Lyric Opera House. It was a startling sound, and it made us laugh. And our laughter made the man say, without apology: "Better now than during the opera, right?"Ah ... right. Good point.I have heard a lot of sounds in opera houses and concert halls. So far, a four-star belch is not one of them.I actually have a strange, twisted obsession with people who make noise in theaters.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1998
Opera-tunity knocks this weekend for those who prefer their musical theater in a more manageable format than Wagnerian epics and Verdian grand passions.The two programs of chamber opera that can be seen in Baltimore are polar opposites: three lightweight heralds of Valentine's Day by Peabody Conservatory of Music opera students; and "Bent Twig," a gritty urban tragedy of drugs, rape and teen pregnancy by the Municipal Opera Company of Baltimore.Dorothy Lofton Jones, a frequent performer with local musical groups and mezzo soloist at Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, founded Municipal Opera in 1991 as a venue in which minority singers could learn their craft.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 11, 1998
On the way to the opera, we heard a man belch. It was loud and clear and uninhibited, a belch with gusto, delivered on Mount Royal Avenue, about 100 paces from the front door of the Lyric Opera House. It was a startling sound, and it made us laugh. And our laughter made the man say, without apology: "Better now than during the opera, right?"Ah ... right. Good point.I have heard a lot of sounds in opera houses and concert halls. So far, a four-star belch is not one of them.I actually have a strange, twisted obsession with people who make noise in theaters.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1998
Opera-tunity knocks this weekend for those who prefer their musical theater in a more manageable format than Wagnerian epics and Verdian grand passions.The two programs of chamber opera that can be seen in Baltimore are polar opposites: three lightweight heralds of Valentine's Day by Peabody Conservatory of Music opera students; and "Bent Twig," a gritty urban tragedy of drugs, rape and teen pregnancy by the Municipal Opera Company of Baltimore.Dorothy Lofton Jones, a frequent performer with local musical groups and mezzo soloist at Brown Memorial Woodbrook Presbyterian Church, founded Municipal Opera in 1991 as a venue in which minority singers could learn their craft.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1997
Reginald Calvert Orem, a retired Cambridge newspaper editor, bon vivant, bibliophile and opera buff, died Sunday at Dorchester General Hospital of heart failure. He was 89.Known as a man of refined tastes and charm who regularly indulged his passion for the printed word, he was known for his daily visits to the Dorchester County Public Library.The rhythmic tapping of his walking stick could be heard striking the ancient red bricks of High Street, the oldest street in Cambridge, as he made his regular midmorning passage to the library.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
Rose G. Breslau Harris, who outlived two husbands, her two sons, and at 98 still was living independently, loving music, walking, playing cards and being with relatives, died of pneumonia Monday at Sinai Hospital.The former Rose Glasser, a resident of the Highfield House on North Charles Street for more than 30 years, was the first-born child in Baltimore of Jewish immigrant parents who came to the city in 1894 from Latvia."She was one of six and the 'American baby' when she was born," said her grandson, Andrew Breslau of New York City.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | July 2, 1992
When Mike Svec's Annapolis High School orchestra performed Mozart's bubbly, rollicking overture to "Cosi fan tutte" a few years back, one of his young violinists, Robin Pomerance, fell in love with the music and wondered what the rest of the opera sounded like.She wasted no time finding out. Before long, the opera bug bit as only the opera bug can.Now a 24-year-old graduate of the University of California at Santa Cruz, Pomerance is in a wonderful position to indulge her passion for Verdi, Puccini and Mozart as a rehearsal department assistant for the San Francisco Opera Company.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 20, 1992
MANY YEARS ago RCA Victor issued a record titled "Opera for People Who Hate Opera." It featured popular arias such as the toreador song from Bizet's "Carmen."I don't know if it actually made many converts to opera, but its premise, at least in theory, was an admirable one: Demonstrate that opera can be melodic and pleasing to the ear and not discordant and shrill, and the listener's interest may be stimulated. In other words, give it a little juice and they will come.What I am recommending for people who hate opera or who have never given it a fair chance is more drastic than RCA's concept: Go see an opera given by the Baltimore Opera Company.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
Roderick Lowell Smith, a former administrator with the U.S. Agency for International Development and an opera buff, died of stroke complications Tuesday at Millennium Health and Rehabilitation Center at South River in Edgewater. He was 91. Mr. Smith was born and raised in Drummond, Okla. After earning his bachelor's degree in journalism in 1934 from the University of Oklahoma, he worked briefly for the Times-Picayune newspaper in New Orleans. During World War II, he served as an officer with the U.S. merchant marine.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 10, 1994
Verdi's "Macbeth" opens Saturday at the Lyric, featuring Baltimore-born bass James Morris and the Baltimore Opera.Here, a Baltimore opera buff's irreverent account of the action, with apologies to Shakespeare and Verdi. Warning: If you don't know how this tragedy comes out, stop reading now.Three groups of witches on a heath appearWith prophecies for Macbeth that he's eager to hear.He'll become Thane of Cawder and then Scotland's king.Banquo will father royalty; that's the news that they bring.
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