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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
You can take Michael Phelps out of Baltimore. You can send him to his fourth Olympics. But what does he do during his downtime? "I've just been watching 'The Wire,'" Phelps said Wednesday, referring to the HBO show that is perhaps as famous a Baltimore export as he is. "I know, I never felt the need to watch it before because it was five minutes from where I live. " He'll be watching more TV on Friday night, but it will be the opening ceremonies for his final Games. Despite being the veritable face of the Olympics after his last two Games, he's never marched with the other athletes to open the quadrennial competition because the swimming events begin the following morning.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
After Nick Symmonds won a silver medal at the World Athletics Championships in Moscow, the American distance runner became the first foreign athlete to openly condemn Russia's anti-gay law on Russian soil. And so far, for what it's worth, he hasn't been incarcerated. On Tuesday, Symmonds took second in the 800-meter final and dedicated his finish to LGBT friends in America, according to Russian news outlet R-Sport . "As much as I can speak out about it, I believe that all humans deserve equality as however God made them," he said to R-Sport.
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SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,Staff Writer | August 24, 1992
About 2,600 athletes threw hats, flags and kisses to a capacity crowd at the Baltimore Arena last night during the opening ceremonies of the 1992 Jewish Community Centers' North American Maccabi Youth Games.Forty participants from Israel began the procession of athletes, ages 13-16, that have come from 50 North American cities and seven foreign countries, including Australia, Great Britain and the former Soviet Union.About 1,000 families in the Baltimore-Columbia area are serving as hosts to the athletes.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Instead of having a ceremonial first pitch to kick off the home opener, the Orioles chose to keep the baseball on the mound, to the left of the pitching rubber. It was done to honor Orioles Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver, who died in January at age 82. It's believed to be the first time the club has not had a ceremonial first pitch for a home opener in Camden Yards history. The Orioles always seem to do celebrations well. This one was obviously understated, and touching.There also was a video tribute to Weaver and his name was listed on the roll call of “Orioles' family,” as the final name (though the rest was listed in alphabetical order, Weaver was behind Earl Williams)
NEWS
June 17, 1993
Limousine service opening in PasadenaAn Extraordinar Limousine Service Inc. will have its opening celebration today from noon to 8 p.m. at the company's offices, 7954 Baltimore-Annapolis Blvd., Pasadena.Sen. Michael J. Wagner and Councilman Ed Middlebrooks will be present.First National to open branch in Glen BurnieThe First National Bank of Maryland will open a new full-service branch office Wednesday at the Price Club Plaza, 561 E. Ordnance Road, Glen Burnie.The opening ceremonies at 10 a.m.will include a donation of $5,000 to to the Cultural Arts Foundation of Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
August 30, 1996
Valu Food will open its first store in Carroll County with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 9 a.m. tomorrow at 2320 Hanover Pike, Greenmount.The grocery store replaces Ames as an anchor in North Carroll Plaza Shopping Center.It offers seafood and deli counters, bakery and a branch office of Carrollton Bank.The 42,000-square-foot store is expected to generate 100 new jobs.Hampstead Mayor Christopher M. Nevin and Town Manager Neil Ridgely, Manchester Mayor Elmer C. Lippy and Valu Food President Louis Denrich are expected to attend the opening ceremonies.
SPORTS
July 13, 1996
Days until opening ceremonies: 6.Christie loses: England's Linford Christie finished second to Jamaica's Michael Green in his last race before defending his 100-meter Olympic title in Atlanta. Both men clocked 10.26 seconds running into a head wind in London.Harris' last shot: Lt. Ronnie Harris, a 1987 Navy graduate, will make his final attempt to make the U.S. track and field team Monday in Montreal. Harris needs to run 5,000 meters in 13 minutes, 29 seconds. In his previous race, last Saturday in Belgium, Harris ran 13: 29.25.
SPORTS
January 29, 1998
Days until opening ceremonies: 9.Snowfall: One-third of an inch in Nagano City, no new snow on men's downhill course. That left 7 inches in Nagano City, and 6 feet, 6 1/2 inches on the downhill course.Update: Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler Akebono will perform a traditional rite of purification at the opening ceremonies. Akebono, a naturalized Japanese citizen, holds sumo's highest rank of grand champion. The other grand champion, Takanohana, had been cast for the part, but bowed out because of illness.
SPORTS
June 15, 1996
Days until opening ceremonies: 34.Update: Despite having his invitation to run the 400 meters at the July 12 London grand prix meet revoked, world champion Michael Johnson said he expects to compete in the event. British athletics spokesman Tony Ward said Johnson had been denied permission to run the 400 meters because it would be "demoralizing" to British runners.Torch: The world's most famous torchbearer will be honored Tuesday when the Olympic flame stops at the Statue of Liberty on its ferry trip across the Hudson River.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 29, 2001
The heads of major federal law enforcement agencies and top political leaders will meet on Capitol Hill on Wednesday to discuss strengthening anti-terrorism measures at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. Nearly 5,000 law enforcement officers from 60 local, state and federal agencies have been assigned to the Games as part of a $200 million security plan, but organizers acknowledge that may not be enough in light of the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and the Washington area.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
Driven by gold for Michael Phelps and the women gymnastics team, NBC's prime-time coverage of the Summer Olympics Tuesday hit a new high in overnight ratings topping those earned by the record-setting opening ceremonies. And maybe it's me, but the complaints in social media didn't seem quite as loud yesterday. Or, maybe they were just drowned out by Phelps becoming the most decorated athlete in Olympics history. I know I saw both Phelps events and some of the women gymnastics on live stream in real time Tuesday afternoon, but still wound up watching the tape-delay version through prime time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
The complaints about NBC not showing marquee events like swimming have not abated, but the network is claiming another night of record viewing Sunday night, based on preliminary overnights. Meanwhile WBAL, the network's Baltimore affiliate, is boasting of its Friday night audience for the opening ceremonies. The Hearst-owned station has been treating tape-delayed events as "spoilers," reporting on them only as a graphic flashed on the screen during the sports portion of its early evening newscasts -- and warning viewers to look away if they don't want to know.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
NBC's Friday-night coverage of the opening ceremonies of the London Olympics drew the largest TV audience on record for a kickoff of the summer games. According to Nielsen figures provided by NBC, 40.7 million average viewers watched the four-hour-plus telecast, outpacing the Atlanta game by 900,000 viewers while topping Beijing by 6 million and Athens by 15 million. NBC's coverage was the highest-rated Friday night on any U.S. network in a decade. Read my review calling the coverage a "winner" here . Meanwhile, a mostly-media-made mini-flap flared when some in the British press criticized NBC for cutting three minutes of opening ceremonies out of the taped-delay version shown to American viewers in favor of an NBC interview with Michael Phelps.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Baltimore's Jim McKay anchored the first American telecast of the Summer Olympics in 1960 from a primitive CBS studio in Grand Central Terminal in New York City. Coverage of the Rome Games totaled 20 hours and cost the network $394,000 in rights fees. On Friday night, starting with the Opening Ceremonies, NBC Universal will launch what will ultimately total 5,535 hours of Olympics coverage across six network and cable outlets and one live streaming website over 17 days and nights.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
You can take Michael Phelps out of Baltimore. You can send him to his fourth Olympics. But what does he do during his downtime? "I've just been watching 'The Wire,'" Phelps said Wednesday, referring to the HBO show that is perhaps as famous a Baltimore export as he is. "I know, I never felt the need to watch it before because it was five minutes from where I live. " He'll be watching more TV on Friday night, but it will be the opening ceremonies for his final Games. Despite being the veritable face of the Olympics after his last two Games, he's never marched with the other athletes to open the quadrennial competition because the swimming events begin the following morning.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
In Michael Phelps ' telling, one of the greatest Olympic careers almost began with a skinny dip. It was the first trip out of the country for the kid from Rodgers Forge, and he gawked like a tourist - not at monuments or museums - but at the famous swimmers competing in Sydney. "I was kind of just like, 'Wow, that's this person, that's that person, there he is, there she is. This is really cool,' " he said in a recent interview, channeling his wide-eyed 15-year-old self at the 2000 Games.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 8, 1998
For hard-core, meat-and-potatoes sports fans, the Olympics, summer or winter, are more staged than the kind of athletic competition they're used to, what with the spectacle of the opening and closing ceremonies, sports they hardly see and athletes they couldn't pick out of a lineup.And most Olympic television coverage, regardless of where the Games are staged, comes through the magic of videotape, which is antithetical to the live manner in which sports fans have been conditioned to expect their sports fix.That's why it was so disheartening during the first night of Nagano competition that bad weather at the men's downhill skiing race knocked out one of the only three scheduled activities that will be shown live in prime time, with Friday's opening ceremonies and the women's downhill on Friday this week being the others.
MOBILE
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Phelps looks to put stamp on perhaps the greatest Olympic career ever In Michael Phelps ' telling, one of the greatest Olympic careers almost began with a skinny dip. It was the first trip out of the country for the kid from Rodgers Forge, and he gawked like a tourist - not at monuments or museums - but at the famous swimmers competing in Sydney. "I was kind of just like, 'Wow, that's this person, that's that person, there he is, there she is. This is really cool,' " he said in a recent interview, channeling his wide-eyed 15-year-old self at the 2000 Games.
SPORTS
July 1, 2012
Boating test Today , 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Test Sea-Doo's braking system for free. Hemingway's at Bay Bridge Marina in Stevensville. Trap shooting Sundays , 1 p.m.; Wednesdays , 6 p.m. Carney Rod & Gun Club, 9721 Hilltop Drive. $5 per round. Information: 410-668-1019. Mondays Critter chow-down Wednesday , 3 p.m., Eden Mill Nature Center, Pylesville. Join the staff every Wednesday at 3p.m. through August to feed the critters.
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