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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
The Open Society Institute-Baltimore is looking for its second group of 10 area residents who want to find solutions to problems in Baltimore's poor communities, the philanthropy announced yesterday.The $48,750 community fellowships are for 18 months. Outstanding projects may be renewed for 18 months.The first group of 10 Baltimore fellows was named last summer and began work in the fall on projects ranging from legal help for caregivers of disabled children to community arts and landscaping efforts.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
On the field next to Northeast Middle School, young refugees Abhishek Yonghang and Ahmed Osman kicked a soccer ball around, each grateful for the common connection as they adjust to a new life far from their former homes in Nepal and Somalia. Three miles away in a classroom at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, junior Wayne Young slipped a suit jacket over his school uniform for debate practice with the Urban Debate League, trying to "look the part" of the Harvard law grad he envisions himself to one day be. The lives of these Baltimore teens are among the thousands influenced by George Soros, a billionaire philanthropist who decided 15 years ago that the city, with severe crime and poverty and just enough potential, was ripe for an experiment.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
David Miller plans to address the high rate of violence among youths in the Edmondson Avenue corridor of West Baltimore.LaTanya Bailey Jones is teaching children to be critical consumers of the electronic media and how to produce media messages.CeremonyMiller, Bailey and eight other Baltimoreans were recognized last night at the Tremont Plaza Hotel for winning 18-month community fellowship grants worth $48,750 each. The awards will enable them to help make a difference in their neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Black men and teens working to improve Baltimore can receive up to $20,000 for their community engagement projects, under a partnership between the Knight and Open Society foundations. The BMe partnership, or the Black Male Engagement Initiative, will provide $200,000 total in grants for city residents who submit applications by March 1 for projects designed to engage other African-American fathers, entrepreneurs, students, artists and community activists. Applications also are open to black men working on Baltimore-based projects.
NEWS
October 24, 1997
GEORGE SOROS has been a lucky gambler. From humble beginnings as a hawker of souvenirs and cheap jewelry, the Hungarian-born naturalized American is now one of the world's most successful money managers. Speculating in currencies and trading in securities, he has amassed a $5 billion fortune. He has given back in a big way, too, committing $1.5 billion to social projects through foundations set up in 31 countries.In August, Mr. Soros pledged to spend $25 million in Baltimore over the next five years on programs designed to fight drug abuse.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Airline flights into the United States from France, Mexico and London are canceled. Armed guards are put onto other flights coming to America. Westerners are warned to avoid Saudi Arabia, and synagogues are bombed in Turkey and France. A package left on the steps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art forces the evacuation of 5,000 museum-goers. (It turns out to contain a stuffed snowman.) National Guardsmen are posted at key bridges and tunnels. Happy New Year. What you are witnessing is why 9/11 amounts to World War III - the third great totalitarian challenge to open societies in the last 100 years.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
So there was George Soros yesterday, proclaiming the virtues of the open society to a gathering of business people, politicians and hometown boosters in the vast, carpeted ballroom of the Hyatt Hotel. Suddenly, a man in a gray suit -- a paying guest -- separated himself from the audience and walked toward the podium."Soros, you are a murderer," he shouted. "You are a criminal!" He followed with a variety of other epithets before being led away.In the silent aftermath, Soros, apparently unfazed, but maybe not, said faintly: "We are in an open society."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Financier-philanthropist George Soros can shake things up around the world.Wielding vast amounts of money, he can send ripples -- even shock waves -- through global markets and societies. When he announced last week, for instance, that he would raise his investment stake in Russia to $2.5 billion, it was headline news in global financial markets.Five years ago, he gambled $10 billion of his own and others' money against the British pound and won, earning a profit variously reported to be between $1 billion and $2 billion when the pound was devalued and burnishing a reputation that has grown to epic proportions.
TOPIC
May 15, 2005
George Soros - the billionaire philanthropist who has spent hundreds of millions of dollars promoting democracy around the world - visited Baltimore last week to encourage people here to do some giving of their own. Soros, a native of Hungary who came to America in 1956, is the founder of the Open Society Institute, a foundation promoting social and economic reform in more than 60 countries. Seven years ago he picked Baltimore as the site of his only American city project. Since then, the OSI office here has spent $50 million working to improve drug treatment, education and rehabilitation programs.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the wake of the attempted bombing last week of the American Airlines flight from Paris by a terrorist nut with explosives in his shoe, I'm thinking of starting my own airline, which would be called: Naked Air. Its motto would be: "Everybody flies naked and nobody worries." Or "Naked Air - where the only thing you wear is a seat belt." Think about it. If everybody flew naked, not only would you never have to worry about the passenger next to you carrying box cutters or exploding shoes, but no religious fundamentalists of any stripe would ever be caught dead flying nude, or in the presence of nude women, and that alone would keep many potential hijackers out of the skies.
NEWS
By Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
When he was in prison, Harold Bailey said, he would often think about the homicide that resulted in his 20-year incarceration and about how his criminal record might cost him opportunities for employment or education. To continue the undergraduate education he had worked at for two years, Bailey would sit in his cell and voraciously read novels, autobiographies, academic texts — any work he could get his hands on. Since his release in 2005, Bailey has earned two degrees, a bachelor's and a master's, from Coppin State University.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 17, 2012
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who made national headlines last year when he made a rare move for an elected official and donated $30 million of his own money to programs for underserved black and Latino youth in New York City, has spread his wealth and commitment to Baltimore.  Bloomberg, who visited the city last week, donated $5 million to the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, the organization announced, for a new education program that...
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
They skate the waterfront promenade of the Inner Harbor, grind on the ledges of downtown Baltimore, do tricks on whatever steps or rails they can find and rankle business owners on the Avenue in Hampden, earning citations from police who aren't quite sure what to do about them. Baltimore's skateboarding teens are also at risk of dropping out of school, never learning to speak up for themselves and making missteps on the tenuous road from adolescence to adulthood. So Stephanie Murdock wants to help them build a skate park.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
Months ago, a homeless man entered Dwayne Hess' West Baltimore coffeehouse. He took in the scene for a few minutes, had a warm beverage, then headed for the door. Before he left, the man turned toward Hess, whom he had never met before, and said something that continues to stick with the former Mennonite farmer. The man, disheveled and obviously down on his luck, spoke of being shunned at other places, some as unremarkable as gas stations, but welcomed without reservation at the coffeehouse.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | November 12, 2007
Paige Fitz lost her father to drug addiction when she was 9. Two years later, her mother died of addiction-related ailments even though she had stopped using drugs and become a counselor. The pain of losing her parents did not ease until Fitz gave birth to a daughter when she was 20. But it was not long before the young woman - who at 25 was pregnant with her second child and still uncertain about her future - realized that she was repeating the cycle of dysfunction that had destroyed her parents.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,sun reporter | March 13, 2007
A gift from the charitable arm of Baltimore investment firm T. Rowe Price has put the Open Society Institute's fundraising campaign closer to the $20 million goal set by billionaire financier George Soros, who founded the institute nearly a decade ago and promised an additional $10 million if local residents also contributed. The institute has raised more than $7 million, including in recent months a $250,000 donation from the T. Rowe Price Associates Foundation and a $200,000 contribution from an anonymous donor, said Debra Rubino, OSI spokeswoman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff; Chicago Tribune | December 28, 2003
A Brief History of the Smile, by Angus Trumble. Basic Books. 240 pages. $26. There are smiles that make you happy. There are smiles that make you blue. And there are smiles that make you sappy. There are more versions of the smile than anyone used to the vacant smirks of broadcasters and politicians might imagine. Many of them can be found in Angus Trumble's A Brief History of the Smile, which treats the specialized facial muscular contractions by category: decorum, lewdness, desire, mirth, wisdom and deceit.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and JoAnna Daemmrich and C. Fraser Smith and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Laura Lippman contributed to this article | November 5, 1998
Well-crafted commercials suggesting that Ellen R. Sauerbrey was an enemy of civil rights drew a record number of African-Americans to the polls this week, but some observers believe the long-term price could be a more deeply polarized Maryland.One of five voters Tuesday was an African-American -- and 90 percent of them voted for Glendening partly because they were fearful of Sauerbrey. Exit polls point to the black vote as Glendening's margin of victory."We won tonight," Glendening said after the result was clear, "because the people of Maryland stood up for a fair, just, inclusive and compassionate society."
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 3, 2006
Last May, when billionaire financier George Soros challenged Baltimore to raise $20 million to support programs to reduce drug addiction, bolster school reform, and decrease juvenile delinquency, he said he was confident that local "Robin Hoods" would pitch in. Nearly a year later, officials at Soros' Open Society Institute-Baltimore say they are well on their way to meeting that challenge, thanks in part to large contributions from two local nonprofits that...
TOPIC
May 15, 2005
George Soros - the billionaire philanthropist who has spent hundreds of millions of dollars promoting democracy around the world - visited Baltimore last week to encourage people here to do some giving of their own. Soros, a native of Hungary who came to America in 1956, is the founder of the Open Society Institute, a foundation promoting social and economic reform in more than 60 countries. Seven years ago he picked Baltimore as the site of his only American city project. Since then, the OSI office here has spent $50 million working to improve drug treatment, education and rehabilitation programs.
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